My Father's Paradise: A Son's Search for His Jewish Past in Kurdish Iraq

Overview


In a remote corner of the world, forgotten for nearly three thousand years, lived an enclave of Kurdish Jews so isolated that they still spoke Aramaic, the language of Jesus. Mostly illiterate, they were self-made mystics and gifted storytellers and humble peddlers who dwelt in harmony with their Muslim and Christian neighbors in the mountains of northern Iraq. To these descendants of the Lost Tribes of Israel, Yona Sabar was born. 

Yona's son Ariel grew up in Los Angeles,...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (49) from $1.99   
  • Used (49) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 5
Showing 1 – 10 of 49 (5 pages)
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(4420)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Very Good
Ex-Library Book - will contain Library Markings. This copy shows very minor wear. Free State Books. Never settle for less.

Ships from: Halethorpe, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(4420)

Condition: Good
Book shows minor use. Cover and Binding have minimal wear, and the pages have only minimal creases. Free State Books. Never settle for less.

Ships from: Halethorpe, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(10524)

Condition: Good
Ex-Library Book - will contain Library Markings. Light shelf wear and minimal interior marks. Millions of satisfied customers and climbing. Thriftbooks is the name you can trust, ... guaranteed. Spend Less. Read More. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Auburn, WA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(16573)

Condition: Acceptable
Algonquin Books, 08/21/2008, Hardcover, Acceptable condition. Acceptable dust jacket. Former Library book.

Ships from: Frederick, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(40)

Condition: Acceptable
Book is in Acceptable condition: The item is fairly worn but continues to work perfectly. Signs of wear can include aesthetic issues such as scratches, dents, and worn corners. ... The item may have identifying markings on it or show signs of previous use. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Ontario, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Express, 48 States
$1.99
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(3001)

Condition: Good
Book has some visible wear on the binding, cover, pages. Biggest little used bookstore in the world.

Ships from: Reno, NV

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(62176)

Condition: Good
Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase ... benefits world literacy! Read more Show Less

Ships from: Mishawaka, IN

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(7975)

Condition: Like New
Only slightly differentiated from a new book. Undamaged cover and spine. Pages may display light wear but no marks. Help save a tree. Buy all your used books from Green Earth ... Books. Read. Recycle and Reuse. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Portland, OR

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$2.89
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(50)

Condition: Acceptable
2008-08-21 Hardcover Fair EX-Library w/ usual stamps, stickers, marks & wear. Mylar cover, ships fast w tracking, K5.

Ships from: Saint Augustine, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$2.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(792)

Condition: Good
2008 Hardcover Good This is a former library book with library stickers and stamps. 100% of this purchase will support literacy programs through a nonprofit organization!

Ships from: Phoenix, AZ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 5
Showing 1 – 10 of 49 (5 pages)
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview


In a remote corner of the world, forgotten for nearly three thousand years, lived an enclave of Kurdish Jews so isolated that they still spoke Aramaic, the language of Jesus. Mostly illiterate, they were self-made mystics and gifted storytellers and humble peddlers who dwelt in harmony with their Muslim and Christian neighbors in the mountains of northern Iraq. To these descendants of the Lost Tribes of Israel, Yona Sabar was born. 

Yona's son Ariel grew up in Los Angeles, where Yona had become an esteemed professor, dedicating his career to preserving his people’s traditions. Ariel wanted nothing to do with his father’s strange immigrant heritage—until he had a son of his own.

Ariel Sabar brings to life the ancient town of Zakho, discovering his family’s place in the sweeping saga of Middle-Eastern history. This powerful book is an improbable story of tolerance and hope set in what today is the very center of the world’s attention.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The Providence (RI) Journal
"Excellent…A compelling read…Told with novelistic attention to narrative and detail, but its heart is Ariel's heart, that of a son searching with love for the meaning of his relationship with his father.” —The Providence (RI) Journal
San Francisco Chronicle
"A powerful story of the meaning of family and tradition inside a little-known culture." —San Francisco Chronicle
The Washington Post Book World

"If Ariel Sabar's My Father's Paradise were only about his father's life, it would be a remarkable enough story about the psychic costs of immigration. But Sabar's family history turns out to be more than the chronicle of one man's efforts to retain something of his homeland in new surroundings. It's also a moving story about the near-death of an ancient language and the tiny flicker of life that remains in it. . . . The chapters describing Yona's budding success as a linguist are thrilling."– Washington Post Book World

From the Publisher

"Excellent…A compelling read…Told with novelistic attention to narrative and detail, but its heart is Ariel's heart, that of a son searching with love for the meaning of his relationship with his father.” —The Providence (RI) Journal

"A powerful story of the meaning of family and tradition inside a little-known culture." —San Francisco Chronicle

"Remarkable...A moving story about the near-death of an ancient language and the tiny flicker of life that remains in it." —The Washington Post Book World

"Voices like Susan Hand Shetterly's are soothing . . . Shetterly puts a hand on your forearm and says, come walk along the Maine coast. Let's consider other species, eels and hummingbirds." –The Los Angeles Times

New York Times Book Review

"Graceful and resonant . . . A personal undertaking for a son who admits he never understood his unassuming, penny-pinching immigrant father, a man who spent three decades obsessively cataloging the words of his moribund mother tongue. Sabar once looked at his father with shame, scornful of the alien who still bore scars on his back from childhood bloodlettings. This book, he writes, is a chance to make amends"– New York Times Sunday Book Review
Washington Post Book World
"If Ariel Sabar's My Father's Paradise were only about his father's life, it would be a remarkable enough story about the psychic costs of immigration. But Sabar's family history turns out to be more than the chronicle of one man's efforts to retain something of his homeland in new surroundings. It's also a moving story about the near-death of an ancient language and the tiny flicker of life that remains in it. . . . The chapters describing Yona's budding success as a linguist are thrilling."– Washington Post Book World
Christian Science Monitor

"A wonderful, enlightening journey, a voyage with the power to move readers deeply even as it stretches across differences of culture, family, and memory." – Christian Science Monitor
Philadelphia Inquirer

A "remarkable new memoir" – Philadelphia Inquirer
Roanoke Times
"Be forewarned: you will lose sleep over this book. . . . [Sabar] mesmerizes with the very first sentences. . . . Unlike many memoirs flooding the book market these days, My Father’s Paradise is both unique and universal.” – Roanoke (Va.) Times
Elle Magazine

A "thoughtful, touching book. . . . A never-ending parade of colorful characters . . .I could not read quickly enough as the Sabars worked to resurrect the past." – Elle magazine, Readers' Prize selection, October 2008
BookPage

"A sensitive exploration . . . [Sabar's grandmother] emerges as a quiet heroine." – BookPage
The Los Angeles Times

"Be forewarned: you will lose sleep over this book. . . . [Sabar] mesmerizes with the very first sentences. . . . Unlike many memoirs flooding the book market these days, My Father’s Paradise is both unique and universal.” – Roanoke (Va.) Times
Philadelphia Inquirer
A "remarkable new memoir" – Philadelphia Inquirer
The Los Angeles Times
"Voices like Susan Hand Shetterly's are soothing . . . Shetterly puts a hand on your forearm and says, come walk along the Maine coast. Let's consider other species, eels and hummingbirds." –The Los Angeles Times
New York Times Book Review
"Graceful and resonant . . . A personal undertaking for a son who admits he never understood his unassuming, penny-pinching immigrant father, a man who spent three decades obsessively cataloging the words of his moribund mother tongue. Sabar once looked at his father with shame, scornful of the alien who still bore scars on his back from childhood bloodlettings. This book, he writes, is a chance to make amends"– New York Times Sunday Book Review
BookPage
"A sensitive exploration . . . [Sabar's grandmother] emerges as a quiet heroine." – BookPage
Roanoke Times
"Be forewarned: you will lose sleep over this book. . . . [Sabar] mesmerizes with the very first sentences. . . . Unlike many memoirs flooding the book market these days, My Father’s Paradise is both unique and universal.” – Roanoke (Va.) Times
Washington Post Book World

"If Ariel Sabar's My Father's Paradise were only about his father's life, it would be a remarkable enough story about the psychic costs of immigration. But Sabar's family history turns out to be more than the chronicle of one man's efforts to retain something of his homeland in new surroundings. It's also a moving story about the near-death of an ancient language and the tiny flicker of life that remains in it. . . . The chapters describing Yona's budding success as a linguist are thrilling."– Washington Post Book World

Christian Science Monitor
"A wonderful, enlightening journey, a voyage with the power to move readers deeply even as it stretches across differences of culture, family, and memory." – Christian Science Monitor
Elle Magazine
A "thoughtful, touching book. . . . A never-ending parade of colorful characters . . .I could not read quickly enough as the Sabars worked to resurrect the past." – Elle magazine, Readers' Prize selection, October 2008
Gal Beckerman
My Father's Paradise is a personal undertaking for a son who admits he never understood his unassuming, penny-pinching immigrant father, a man who spent three decades obsessively cataloging the words of his moribund mother tongue. Sabar once looked at his father with shame, scornful of the alien who still bore scars on his back from childhood bloodlettings. This book, he writes, is a chance to make amends.
—The New York Times
Donna Rifkind
If Ariel Sabar's My Father's Paradise were only about his father's life, it would be a remarkable enough story about the psychic costs of immigration. But Sabar's family history turns out to be more than the chronicle of one man's efforts to retain something of his homeland in new surroundings. It's also a moving story about the near-death of an ancient language and the tiny flicker of life that remains in it…The chapters describing Yona's budding success as a linguist are thrilling, as both he and his professors recognized that as a speaker of Aramaic he was a living repository of an endangered tongue.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

For his first 31 years Sabar considered his father, Yona, an embarrassing anachronism. "Ours was a clash of civilizations, writ small. He was ancient Kurdistan. I was 1980s L.A." Yona was a UCLA professor whose passion was his native language, Aramaic. Ariel was an aspiring rock-and-roll drummer. The birth of Sabar's own son in 2002 was a turning point, prompting Sabar to try to understand his father on his own terms. Readers can only be grateful to him for unearthing the history of a family, a people and a very different image of Iraq. Sabar vividly depicts daily life in the remote village of Zahko, where Muslims, Jews and Christians banded together to ensure prosperity and survival, and in Israel (after the Jews' 1951 expulsion from Iraq), where Kurdish Jews were stereotyped as backward and simple. Sabar's career as an investigative reporter at the Baltimore Sun and elsewhere serves him well, particularly in his attempt to track down his father's oldest sister, who was kidnapped as an infant. Sabar offers something rare and precious-a tale of hope and continuity that can be passed on for generations. Photos. (Sept. 16)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

Sabar, a former political reporter for the Christian Science Monitor, grew up as a typical California kid. His father, a Kurdish Jew, is the foremost scholar of Aramaic, the language of Jesus, which most people think is extinct. The disconnect between his present and his past launched Sabar on a quest to understand the history of Kurdish Jews, who spent 2000 years in northern Iraq until the 1950s, when most of them emigrated to Israel. Interweaving the community's history with his family's stories, Sabar tells of his visits to Iraq and Israel to trace his father's journey from an isolated Kurdish village to UCLA, where at one point he provides Aramaic dialog for The X-Files. Although Sabar ultimately fails to discover the fate of his father's sister, who was kidnapped from their village in the 1930s, he does begin to understand his responsibility to his ancestry. Throughout the narrative, he focuses on identity and community and this central question: "When we carry our languages and stories from one generation to the next, from one country to another, what exactly do we gain?" Written with a reporter's flair for people and places, this is recommended for public libraries.
—Diane Harvey

Kirkus Reviews
In a filial salute and show of contrition, D.C.-based journalist Sabar recounts his family's unusual history, reaching back to times before the Bible. The author's remarkable father, Yona, was born in remote Zakho, a dusty, isolated village not far from Mosul. The Jews of Kurdish Iraq, believed to be descended from one of the lost tribes of the Babylonian exile, were the last people to speak a form of Aramaic, the language of Jesus and lingua franca of much of the ancient world. In the 1950s, they emigrated en masse to Israel, where Yona and his family, with their strange costumes, customs and language, found themselves at the bottom of the ethnic and economic hierarchy. Unfolding the tale of their assimilation with the novelistic skill of a Levantine storyteller, Sabar traces his father's journey from poverty to professorship. Yona's diaspora story began with the end of Iraq Jewry, continued through scholarship in Jerusalem to a teaching post at Yale and reached fulfillment in a distinguished academic career at UCLA and the compilation of an Aramaic dictionary. A generational and cultural gap divided the immigrant father from the cool son who cared little for his heritage. Then, prompted by the birth of his own son, Sabar began to investigate his family's past. Eventually he and Yona visited a vastly altered Zakho, a town without Jews that now boasts a cybercafe. Describing their pilgrimage and the history that preceded it, the author spins a colorful tale inhabited by wonderful characters in billowing trousers and turbans. The distance between father and son is bridged as Sabar explores the conflicting demands of love and tradition, the burdens and blessings of an ancient cultureencountering the 21st century. A well-researched text falling somewhere between journalism and memoir, sustained by Mesopotamian imagination. Agent: Andrew Blauner/Blauner Books Literary Agency
The Barnes & Noble Review
Yona Sabar, a professor at UCLA, is an eminent scholar of Neo-Aramaic, the heroic rescuer of a language near extinction, and the sort of mensch who prompts rapturous reviews and fierce admiration from his students. But to his son Ariel, growing up among the privileged offspring of Los Angeles's moneyed set, Yona -- a Kurdish Jew born in Zakho, Iraq, who emigrated to Israel and, ultimately, the United States -- was a source of shame and an object of ridicule, an immigrant with funny hair, a funny accent, and funny habits. In a flashy world of fast cars, rock 'n' roll, and Hollywood glitz, Yona drove a dented Chevette, cut his own hair, wore ugly discount clothing, and further mortified his son by, say, bringing his own travel shampoo bottle of Manischewitz Cream White Concord into restaurants because paying $3 for a glass of wine off the menu was "out of the question."

"Ours was a clash of civilizations, writ small," Ariel Sabar writes in the delicately calibrated, determinedly reported and unflinchingly candid My Father's Paradise: A Son's Search for His Jewish Past in Kurdish Iraq. "He was ancient Kurdistan. I was 1980s L.A. He grew up in a dusty town in northern Iraq, in a crowded mud-brick shack without electricity or plumbing. I grew up in a white stucco ranch house in West Los Angeles, on a leafy street made safe by private police cruisers marked BEL-AIR PATROL."

Yet when Sabar's own son, Seth, was born, in 2002, and focused on him a look that seemed to ask, "Who are you?" Sabar, who is currently covering the U.S. presidential campaigns for the Christian Science Monitor, did what any journalist would do: He picked up his reporter's notebook and started asking questions.

Speaking with his father's relatives and friends, listening to his father's stories with an attention that was genuinely avid and completely new, digging deep and reading up, Sabar reconstructs his father's roots and traces his life. In doing so, Sabar begins to understand not only where he comes from but who he is and who he hopes to be. He also finds that he and his father have more in common than he ever imagined. And opens his readers' eyes to a culture that they may never have known existed.

"His people, the Jews of Kurdistan, were the world's oldest Jewish diaspora," Sabar writes of his father's family. "Earthy, hardworking, and deeply superstitious, they had lived in isolated mountain villages alongside Muslim Kurds for nearly 2,700 years but never abandoned their ancient tongue: Aramaic. Aramaic had been the lingua franca, or common language, of the Near East for two thousand years. Jesus spoke it. Parts of the Bible were inked in it. Three Mesopotamian empires used it as their official language. But by the time of my father's birth, in 1938, it was all but dead. After Islamic armies conquered the region in the seventh century, Middle Eastern Jews switched to the Arabic of their Muslim neighbors. Aramaic clung to life in just one place: on the lips of Jews, and some Christians, in Kurdistan."

The fate of the Jews of Kurdistan themselves was equally precarious: The geographic isolation that had for centuries preserved an ancient language could not, ultimately, protect Kurdistan's 25,000 Jews, "who saw themselves as the direct descendents of the Lost Tribes of Israel," from the world -- or from change.

In the book's opening chapters, Sabar vividly evokes life in Zakho circa 1930 -- with its narrow, zigzagging unpaved roads; clustered flat-roof mud-brick houses; cramped open-air market; river banks speckled with scampering children and tea-sipping men; Jews, Muslims and Christians peacefully coexisting. There, in Zakho's Jewish quarter, we meet Sabar's grandmother, Miryam, whose childhood hardships (a mother's early death, a stepmother's cruelty) and difficulties thereafter are recounted quite movingly. Particularly affecting is Sabar's retelling of the disappearance of his grandmother's firstborn, a "little thumb girl" named Rifqa, a sickly baby who was handed over to a Muslim wet nurse to regain her health and was never seen again.

It's hard not to feel, as Sabar clearly does, that a more dedicated search could have been made for the baby. Was she dead or kidnapped? And as Miryam rejoices in the birth of her baby son, Yona, and in her subsequent offspring, the mystery surrounding Rifqa's disappearance never quite leaves the reader's mind. True, it is Yona's book -- and so we follow his journey from Zakho to Israel to America with fond interest. We marvel at his progress from ghetto to university and his efforts to save his mother tongue. We nod in recognition at Sabar's candid confessions about his own poor treatment of his father, a gentle, caring soul who clearly deserved better. And we delight in their father-son bonding trip to Zakho, a city that is now moving rapidly into the 21st century.

But when Sabar takes it upon himself to return to Iraq to try to track down his aunt, whom he has become obsessed with finding, we feel grateful -- and we share his disappointment when all the promising leads prove false. Yet, with him, we learn a lesson.

"In the search for my past, I had made a wrong turn with the hunt for my lost aunt," Sabar concludes. "I had wanted an Oprah moment, in which relatives separated at birth embrace through tears and order is restored to the world. I see now that if I want to repair my ties to the past, to my forefathers and father, it will take more than a 'get.' It will be a work of days and months and years."

By attending the stories of his father's past, by listening and walking step-by-step through his father's journey, Ariel Sabar has arrived at a clearer sense of who his father is, how alike they are -- and how finally to answer his own son's silent demand: "Who are you?" --Amy Reiter

Amy Reiter is an editor at Salon. She has also written for The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post Book World, Wine Spectator, and Glamour, among other publications.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781565124905
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
  • Publication date: 9/16/2008
  • Pages: 325
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Ariel Sabar

Ariel Sabar is an award-winning former staff writer for the Baltimore Sun and the Providence (RI) Journal. His work has also appeared in the New York Times, the Christian Science Monitor, the Washington Monthly, Moment, Mother Jones magazine, and other publications. He lives with his wife and two children in Washington, D.C.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Zakho

1 What's in a Name 9

2 An Island in a River 12

3 A Book with Shining Pages 16

4 Rotten Corn 19

5 A Surprise 25

6 The Dyer's Son 28

7 Little Thumb Girl 31

8 A Woman's Purpose 42

9 A Prayer to the Prophet 45

10 No Wasted Steps 48

11 Lost in the Land of Assyria 51

12 Speaking with Angels 57

13 Arabs Before Jews 61

14 Plus and Minus 65

15 The Mountains Are Our Only Friends 67

16 Freezing in Baghdad 72

17 Hanging 76

18 Let the Hajji Speak 80

19 Can't Help This Time 83

20 To Hell with Books 87

21 Let My People Go 93

22 A Suitable Level of Civilization 96

23 God Will Provide 102

24 Iraqi Stamps 103

Israel

25 Kissing the Ground 109

26 Where Are the Jewish Synagogues? 111

27 Herzl's Beard 117

28 Ana Kurdi 120

29 Some of the Best in Zakho 124

30 John Savage 126

31 Sleepwalking out Windows 134

32 The Brotherhood of Man 145

33 Gold 149

Aramaic

34 Lishana Deni 155

35 Cleft Sentences 159

36 It's All God's World 164

37 Hets and 'Ayins 172

38 Abandoning the Fountainhead 175

39 Exiled and Redeemed 183

40 Systematic Description of a Living Dialect 189

41 Getting Lost 192

Yale

42 Aramaic for Dirges 197

43 To a Deep Well 203

44 Missions 213

45 A Memorial Candle 218

46 Are They Kings? 220

47 Some Enchanted Place 223

Father and Son

48 Speechless 229

49 Hollywood on the Habur 241

50 Coming of the Messiah 247

51 Covenants 254

The Return

52 River Keeps Flowing 261

53 Time Travel 267

54 Habur 272

55 Kiss the Eyes of Your Sons 274

56 Turkish Delights or Jordan Almonds 278

57 Heaven Sent 283

58 Chasing Phantoms 287

59 A Disaster, God Forbid 291

60 Kind of a Problem296

61 Breakdown 298

62 "The girl, the Jew, is alive" 301

63 Convenient Truths 308

Conclusion

64 Paradise Lost 315

65 Ice-Blended Mocha 318

66 Saba's Music 321

Selected Bibliography 329

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 26, 2009

    Some clarifications

    The book of Ariel Sabar My Father`s Paradise is quite illuminating in covering the exotic community of Kurdistani Jews. The interested reader who wants to know more about that community can find numerous video clips of Aramaic songs and wedding dances of Kurdish Jews on the You Tube. <BR/>In praising the book it has to be noticed, however, that some of the opinions expressed by the author demand further clarifications. First, Kurdistan was never a paradise (or a place of peaceful coexistence) for Jews, or anybody else, including Kurds. In 1915 Kurdistan became `killing fields¿ of the Armenian Holocaust. While the Jews were not robbed or killed, they had to pay a tribute to local Muslim aghas (chieftains) for the right to be left alone in peace. Second, Ariel Sabar is wrong in being critical of Zionists for their attempts to get the Jews out of Iraq in 1948-1951. Moving `Kurdim¿ to Israel saved their lives. One can only imagine what would happen to the Jewish community, if left to live under the regime of Saddam Hussein. Third, the attitude of Israeli government to Kurdistani Jews was not much different from that to the immigrants from Poland or Romania. They all were send upon arrival to the same maabarot (transition settlements), because in 1951 the State of Israel had no means to build proper housing for immigrants. By 1965, however, most of the people were moved to their own apartments, which while very small by American standards, were quite decent by the standards of the Third World (Israel was then a part of the Third world). Fourth, it is true that the Jews of Kurdistan as well as Yemen had a difficult time to adopt to the new life in Israel. Many of them were illiterate. But Yona Sabar got a good enough education in Israeli school to continue the studies in Hebrew University. He left for America not because of discrimination but because of much wider opportunities to continue his studies and get a job there. Israel in 1966 was (and still is) a very small place. Many (mainly Ashkenazi Jews) left for Europe or US for the same reason. <BR/>I suspect that, if only Mr Sabar could get his American glasses off and put on the Jewish ones, he could have been more focused, more forgiving and the story of his father¿s paradise would be even more enriching. Nevertheless, despite some drawbacks, a very good, book.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    New interesting topic

    I needed this book for a book and author session and found both the book and author very interesting. Had no idea there was a Jewish Kurdish population.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)