My First Chinese New Year

My First Chinese New Year

5.0 2
by Karen Katz
     
 

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Hooray! Hooray!
Soon it will be Chinese New Year.

A fun and colorful way to introduce the
Chinese New Year to young readers

Chinese New Year is a time of new beginnings. Follow one little girl as she learns how to welcome the coming year and experience all the festivities surrounding it. This warm and lively introduction to a

Overview

Hooray! Hooray!
Soon it will be Chinese New Year.

A fun and colorful way to introduce the
Chinese New Year to young readers

Chinese New Year is a time of new beginnings. Follow one little girl as she learns how to welcome the coming year and experience all the festivities surrounding it. This warm and lively introduction to a special holiday will make even the youngest child want to start a Chinese New Year tradition!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Karen Katz introduces readers to the traditions and importance of this holiday in China with My First Chinese New Year. "Red means good luck and happiness in China" reads the text, as mother and child hang patterned red tissues for decoration. The girl narrator "sweep[s] away the bad luck from last year" with her younger sister and makes an altar "to honor our ancestors" with her grandfather, among other activities sure to inspire readers and their kin. The family enjoying a banquet and a colorful parade round out the fun. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Vibrant illustrations done in collage and mixed media accompany this simple story explaining the traditions surrounding the Chinese New Year celebrations. The narrator and her family are preparing for the big event. She hangs red papers with her mother, buys plum and quince blossoms with her father, and makes an alter with her Grandpa, decorated with oranges and tangerines. Along with her sister, the narrator has her hair cut in honor of the new year, and they grab hold of a broom to sweep out bad luck. Grandma helps make a special soup. The reasons for each tradition are explained in simple sentences. The story culminates with the big parade. The family watches the Lion Dancers, drummers, and floats, which all precede the grand finale: the Dragon. "Gung Hay Fat Choy!" declares the last page, "Happy New Year!" A brief author's note is included at the end of the book, explaining the Chinese calendar and the significance of the traditions. 2004, Henry Holt and Company, Ages 4 to 8.
—Mary Loftus
Kirkus Reviews
A girl and her family celebrate the Chinese New Year in Katz's engaging offering. Throughout, holiday traditions and symbolism are clearly and simply explained. "Red means good luck and happiness in China," the girl says, as she and her mother hang colorful banners throughout the house. Later, purchasing plum and quince blossom with her father, she says, "The tiny buds remind us that new things can always grow." With her grandmother, the girl makes soup "to bring good health." Katz uses bright colors and energetic patterns in her collage and mixed-media illustrations to capture the excitement that surrounds the celebration. At the New Year's Day parade, a multicultural crowd lines the street, reflecting the diversity of urban America. Gung Hay Fat Choy! This one's a winner. (author's note) (Picture book. 2-5)
From the Publisher

“Throughout, holiday traditions and symbolism are clearly and simply explained... This one's a winner.” —Kirkus Reviews

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781250018687
Publisher:
Square Fish
Publication date:
12/11/2012
Series:
My First Holiday Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
510,717
Product dimensions:
7.98(w) x 8.82(h) x 0.16(d)
Lexile:
AD560L (what's this?)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Karen Katz has written and illustrated many books for children, including The Colors of Us, Can You Say Peace, My First Ramadan, Counting Kisses and Where is Baby's Belly Button. Long inspired by folk art from around the world, she was inspired to write her first book, Over the Moon, when she and her husband adopted their daughter from Guatemala, and she wanted to tell the story of welcoming Lena into their lives. Katz loves to paint and experiment with texture, color, collage and pattern. Besides an author and illustrator, she has been a costume designer, quilt maker, fabric artist and graphic designer. Katz and her family divide their time between New York City and Saugerties, New York.

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My First Chinese New Year 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After reading this my daughter and I were able to learn some of the traditions of the Chinese New Year celebrations. This knowledge will be used for the future when we adopt our next daughter from China.