My Friend Isabelle

My Friend Isabelle

by Eliza Woloson, Bryan Gough, Bryan Gough
     
 

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Isabelle and Charlie are friends. They both like to draw, dance, read, and play at the park. They both like to eat Cheerios. They both cry if their feelings are hurt. And like most friends, they are also different from each other. Isabelle has Down syndrome. Charlie doesn't.

Written by Isabelle's mother, this charming tale encourages readers to think about…  See more details below

Overview

Isabelle and Charlie are friends. They both like to draw, dance, read, and play at the park. They both like to eat Cheerios. They both cry if their feelings are hurt. And like most friends, they are also different from each other. Isabelle has Down syndrome. Charlie doesn't.

Written by Isabelle's mother, this charming tale encourages readers to think about what makes a friendship special. My Friend Isabelle also opens the door for young children to talk about differences and the world around them. It's a wonderful story to read at bedtime or to share at school. Lively full color illustrations dovetail beautifully with the text to bring the simple story to life.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Charlie and Isabelle are friends who are the same age but are different in many ways. One is tall and the other is short, one carries a kitty and the other a doll, but they love to play together. They paint, they dance to Stevie Wonder records, and they both cry when they forget to share. These two preschoolers are just like all other preschoolers except for one notable difference. Isabelle is Down syndrome child. My Friend Isabelle is an important story to share with children as a way to acquaint them with children with Down syndrome. Often children assume that Down Syndrome children are not the same as them and in many ways they are. While it is certainly true that they are different in some ways, they are not to be feared or thought little of. They are curious, playful, and loving children and presenting them in this way to other children is a very positive step that can lead to greater understanding of Down syndrome children. Exploring differences, whether it is cultural or psychological, in books helps children accept those differences. This book is perfect for building awareness and acceptance of Down syndrome. 2003, Woodbine House, Ages 2 to 6.
— Joan Kindig, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Isabelle has Down syndrome, but that doesn't matter to her friend Charlie. "I am tall. Isabelle is short. I run f a s t. Isabelle takes her time." He describes all the things they do, how sometimes they're the same and sometimes different. "Mommy says," Charlie explains, "that differences are what make the world so great," and each page follows this theme of inclusion and acceptance. Watercolors in greens, purples, blues, and oranges move the story along, sometimes with full-page pictures and sometimes with small drawings. Both children have round faces and simple lines for eyes, and some readers may not even realize (without the postscript) what it is that makes Isabelle different from Charlie. "Life is more fun with friends like Isabelle," Charlie says, and readers will agree.-Linda Beck, Indian Valley Public Library, Telford, PA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781890627508
Publisher:
Woodbine House
Publication date:
10/28/2003
Pages:
28
Sales rank:
467,441
Product dimensions:
5.84(w) x 7.76(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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