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My Funny Dad, Harry
     

My Funny Dad, Harry

4.7 7
by Karen Arlettaz Zemek
 

Filled With Emotions

The short funny stories in this book about my dad, his family, his cats and the strange things he did are all true. Many of us deal with aging parents so can relate to a lot of things in this book. You will smile, chuckle and may even laugh out loud but also will find parts very touching that may bring a tear to your eye. Get ready for

Overview

Filled With Emotions

The short funny stories in this book about my dad, his family, his cats and the strange things he did are all true. Many of us deal with aging parents so can relate to a lot of things in this book. You will smile, chuckle and may even laugh out loud but also will find parts very touching that may bring a tear to your eye. Get ready for a quick, easy, emotional read and learn to cherish the people in your day-to-day life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781432714178
Publisher:
Outskirts Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/05/2007
Pages:
168
Product dimensions:
0.39(w) x 8.50(h) x 5.50(d)

Meet the Author

Karen Arlettaz Zemek wrote this book in memory of her father, Harrington "Harry" Arlettaz. She grew up with two foster sisters and a foster brother. She is a secretary at a law firm and lives in Parma, Ohio, with her husband, Gerard, and two nice cats, Moe and Spunky Doodle. She enjoys bowling, tennis, playing games on pogo.com and selling on eBay. Karen has served the Lord Jesus practically her whole life by being involved in many church ministries.

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My Funny Dad, Harry 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
FriendEP More than 1 year ago
"My Funny Dad, Harry is more than the story of an adoring daughter sharing vignettes of her dad over a lifetime. It’s a tribute of love, acceptance, caring and so much more. Author Karen Arlettaz Zemek chronicles her childhood and into the adult years, of her family but especially her precious relationship with her “creatively industrious” father. Harry had a thingamajig, brainstorming idea, creation or solution for everything! He tinkered, usually successfully, to make a haven hotel for stray felines, a gadget for pruning weeds, albeit painfully slow and endless other solution ideas. I especially like how the author genuinely delighted in his tinkering but also could stand strong when his health was deteriorating. She wove the delicate line between providing the care he really needed and respecting his autonomous stubborn streak that insisted on independence. I give this book 3 1/2 stars”
YvonnePerry More than 1 year ago
I had flashbacks of my grandfather when reading Karen's book about her father. Those idiosyncrasies that characterize a man raised in the early 1900s reminded me of the fun times I had with my grandfather. He was such a quiet person. One never knew what he was thinking. I decided after reading My Funny Dad, Harry that I am not supposed to understand all the crazy things he did; I only need to accept them as part of who he was. I envision Harry and my grandfather somewhere in the afterlife having a conversation about the good old days. Busy with his hands, ever creating something from whatever material was available, seems to be Harry's way of passing time. Whether in the woodworking shop, or trying his hand at being a locksmith, Harry always managed to provide a descent living for his family. His family included foster children that were raised alongside his own children. He was so unconcerned about what others thought of him, he didn't even wear a tuxedo to his own daughter's wedding. Well, that's just the way Harry was. Harry was always busy, so it was no surprise that he had to have his hands into the derby race when his daughter participated in AWANAs. And, the man loved cats. This was way before anyone thought of having pets spayed or neutered so there were always plenty of furry critters hanging around the house or maybe I should say the kitty condo he made for them. Did I say the man loved cats? The book has humor aplenty, but there is also a sad side of the story when Karen's mom, Harry's wife, Lenore became sick. But, this was just another chance for Harry to come to the rescue and show his love for his family. He would not allow his beloved wife to be admitted to a nursing home. He personally took on the daily care for her and did not once leave her alone. He made sure someone was with her if he had matters outside the home to tend to. After a stay in the hospital Lenore finally passed on. A few months later, Harry, never admitting his loneliness, fell and broke his hip. After three weeks in the hospital he made an amazing recovery. You have to wonder if perhaps it was his concern for all those cats living alone at his house that sprang him to life again. During his recovery, he came up with a new way to do the things he used to do including weeding with a mechanism he created that didn't force him to bend over. Such an inventor, that Harry! Harry had a system of organization that would not be matched even by those popular design shows you see on TV where a "professional" organizer comes in and puts an end to clutter. Harry saved everything and everything had a place. He even "dated' his food. I bet you never heard of a man doing that! When remembering birthdays, he even put the person's year of birth on the calendar. Probably just wanted to see how old they were. At age 88 after living a full and loving life, Harry joined his wife in heaven. Karen was the one who found him lying between the toilet and the tub in his bathroom. She made sure he was buried in his brand new underwear she found neatly arranged in his dresser drawer. The package still unopened. I felt for her. I wanted to cry, but I knew that Karen was a strong person. Not that she wouldn't grieve for her dear dad, but that she had a handle on life and a faith that would keep her chin up through the sale of her dad's house.
midnightwriter71 More than 1 year ago
Karen Arlettaz Zemek took the time to do what many have only thought about or wished they could do. She wrote down her memories of her father and published them in a book. She didn't have to share him with us, but she did. In the book, My Funny Dad, Harry, the author treats you to many stories about her childhood with her father as well as stories up until his last days. You will be treated to many "tails" of his rescued cats and there are many pictures to enjoy. I loved the pictures. I found this book rather endearing because my grandfather was a carpenter and he could fix anything so I could just picture Harry's stores of wood. This was a book I kept reading through to the early hours simply because I wanted to find out what Harry would do next.

I hope that this book inspires others to write down their memories of the people they love. Share them!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved the book. Parents are heroes. It was a loving tribute to her father. I loved every minute of it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My Funny Dad, Harry By Karen Arlettaz Zemek `My Funny Dad, Harry¿ is a unique, interesting collection of memories about a gentle man who was a devoted husband and father. His daughter, author Karen Arlettaz Zemek leads us through the early years of her life and shows us how she and her father had a special bond that continued growing throughout their lives. Mrs. Zemek allows the reader to share in her father¿s love of cats through the many pictures sprinkled through the book and the memories that are tied to how he loved and cared for them. She portrays her father thoughtfully and eloquently as she became his caregiver during the last years of his life. This is a memoir that allows the author to meet her father and is a loving tribute to his life and the many memories his daughter chose to share with the world. This book is a pleasure to read and will make you smile and laugh as well as bring a tear to your eyes as you read this lovingly crafted memoir. My Funny Dad, Harry is a must read for those who enjoy memoirs
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had flashbacks of my grandfather when reading Karen¿s book about her father. Those idiosyncrasies that characterize a man raised in the early 1900s reminded me of the fun times I had with my grandfather. He was such a quiet person. One never knew what he was thinking. I decided after reading My Funny Dad, Harry that I am not supposed to understand all the crazy things he did I only need to accept them as part of who he was. I envision Harry and my grandfather somewhere in the afterlife having a conversation about the good old days. Busy with his hands, ever creating something from whatever material was available, seems to be Harry¿s way of passing time. Whether in the woodworking shop, or trying his hand at being a locksmith, Harry always managed to provide a descent living for his family. His family included foster children that were raised alongside his own children. He was so unconcerned about what others thought of him, he didn¿t even wear a tuxedo to his own daughter¿s wedding. Well, that¿s just the way Harry was. Harry was always busy, so it was no surprise that he had to have his hands into the derby race when his daughter participated in AWANAs. And, the man loved cats. This was way before anyone thought of having pets spayed or neutered so there were always plenty of furry critters hanging around the house or maybe I should say the kitty condo he made for them. Did I say the man loved cats? The book has humor aplenty, but there is also a sad side of the story when Karen¿s mom, Harry¿s wife, Lenore became sick. But, this was just another chance for Harry to come to the rescue and show his love for his family. He would not allow his beloved wife to be admitted to a nursing home. He personally took on the daily care for her and did not once leave her alone. He made sure someone was with her if he had matters outside the home to tend to. After a stay in the hospital Lenore finally passed on. A few months later, Harry, never admitting his loneliness, fell and broke his hip. After three weeks in the hospital he made an amazing recovery. You have to wonder if perhaps it was his concern for all those cats living alone at his house that sprang him to life again. During his recovery, he came up with a new way to do the things he used to do including weeding with a mechanism he created that didn¿t force him to bend over. Such an inventor, that Harry! Harry had a system of organization that would not be matched even by those popular design shows you see on TV where a ¿professional¿ organizer comes in and puts an end to clutter. Harry saved everything and everything had a place. He even ¿dated¿ his food. I bet you never heard of a man doing that! When remembering birthdays, he even put the person¿s year of birth on the calendar. Probably just wanted to see how old they were. At age 88 after living a full and loving life, Harry joined his wife in heaven. Karen was the one who found him lying between the toilet and the tub in his bathroom. She made sure he was buried in his brand new underwear she found neatly arranged in his dresser drawer. The package still unopened. I felt for her. I wanted to cry, but I knew that Karen was a strong person. Not that she wouldn¿t grieve for her dear dad, but that she had a handle on life and a faith that would keep her chin up through the sale of her dad¿s house. I liked the photos Karen included in her book. I¿ve met all the kitties and in case I need more information about any one of them, I could resort to Appendix B in the back of the book. . I cracked up when I saw the picture of Harry¿s oven. He was not much of a cook, but having good organizing skills, he made good use of the space as extra storage for small appliances! Now, you might imagine that a book about someone else¿s dad might be boring, but the thing I liked best about the book was that it made me remember the good times I had with my own quirky male relatives. Zemek used a chronological method to arrange her materia
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is like none I've ever read. It is about an ordinary man who lived a quiet life that honored God. His story is told through the eyes of his daughter and gives insight into her feelings as well. It is all true and was written in his memory after he died in February of 2007 at age 89. He still lived on his own while struggling with problems of aging and diabetes. He was a wonderful father and a cat lover who took care of strays around his house and even let some move into his upstairs rent free! It is filled with pictures that also add interest. It's a short, quick read filled with emotions that any cat lover or anyone with aging parents would enjoy.