The My Greatest Day in Baseball, 1946-1997

The My Greatest Day in Baseball, 1946-1997

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by Bob McCullough
     
 

My Greatest Day in Baseball, 1946-1997 provides almost one hundred interviews with the greatest players of our time, including Hank Aaron, Ernie Banks, Reggie Jackson, Orel Hershiser, Cal Ripken, Jr., and both Ken Griffey Senior and Junior. Each player reveals what he feels was his best moment in baseball and why.  See more details below

Overview

My Greatest Day in Baseball, 1946-1997 provides almost one hundred interviews with the greatest players of our time, including Hank Aaron, Ernie Banks, Reggie Jackson, Orel Hershiser, Cal Ripken, Jr., and both Ken Griffey Senior and Junior. Each player reveals what he feels was his best moment in baseball and why.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
McCullough, a frequent contributor to PW, has compiled interviews with 90 ballplayers, managers, umpires and announcers. He has avoided such famous events as Bobby Thomson's 1951 home run and Don Larsen's perfect game in 1956 to concentrate on a ragtag group that ranges from Hank Aaron to Tom Lasorda to Mudcat Grant, and has come up with some surprising comments from his subjects. For instance, father-and-son tandem Ken Griffey, Junior and Senior, both say playing on the major-league level together was their greatest thrill, while another father-and-son team, Randy and Todd Hundley, differ Randy recalling the day of Todd's birth and hitting a grand-slam home run and Todd telling how difficult it was to break Roy Campanella's home-run record for catchers. The recently deceased Hall-of-Fame announcer Harry Caray recalls Cardinal Stan Musial's 3000th hit as most memorable, while the late Richie Ashburn remembers throwing out Dodger Cal Abrams at the plate to save the pennant for the 1950's Phillies. Mets reliever Tug McGraw recalls that pitching in front of his father in the stands for the first time was his biggest thrill, while Joe Carter remembers dreaming about the number "3" the night before he hit a three-run home run to win the World Series for the Toronto Blue Jays in 1993. Henry Aaron calls the day he first put on a major-league uniform his greatest thrill, while Jerry Koosman reminisces about manager Gil Hodges and the miracle 1969 Mets. In an era when many ballplayers are perceived as over-paid and self-centered, McCullough has managed to present a portrait that is filled not with self-aggrandizing achievements, but with warm personal anecdotes to charm every baseball fan. (May)
Library Journal
In these interviews sportswriter McCullough asks some 90 baseball stars of the past 50 years one basic question: "What was your greatest day in baseball?" Many of the answers will come as no surprise to fans: The ever-ebullient Ernie Banks chooses any day he put on the uniform. Joe Carter picks his home run that won the 1993 World Series. What might surprise the modern fan, jaded by strikes, free agency, and the play/management tug-of-war over money, is the large number of players who chose simply making the big leagues, playing in their first major league game, or, as in the case of Yankees pitcher David Cone, merely seeing their first major league game as a child, as their greatest day in baseball. Their love for the game shines through and makes these interviews a breath of fresh air.Jim G. Burns, Ottumwa P.L., IA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780878339891
Publisher:
Taylor Trade Publishing
Publication date:
04/28/1998
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.32(h) x 1.00(d)

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The My Greatest Day in Baseball, 1946-1997 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
frank_the_tank More than 1 year ago
My Greatest Day in Baseball is about baseball all stars from 1946 to 1997 that explain the amazing accomplishments that they did from the time they wake up to the end of the 9th inning. I thought it was a really good book and it was funny how modest the baseball players were when they break records and do something no one has ever done before. Reggie Jackson talks about how he hung out with his woman all day and showed up to the last ten minutes of batting practice. He explained how he hit the best batting practice he ever had, hitting almost all the pitches out of the park. The players were amazed and all stopped what they were doing to watch. But Reggie says it was no biggie and didn't really think much of it at the time. Then once he started hitting in the game all of his hits were homeruns and by his third homerun the fans gave him a standing ovation. It didn't really hit him until he say the 70,000 people standing and applauding at his record he just broke and upped the bar by another homer. I couldn't believe he acted like it was just another normal baseball game. This book also shows how much America has come with race issues. The very first person in this book is Hank Aaron. His greatest day was when he hit his 715th home run and broke Babe Ruth's record and was voted MVP of that year. But being a black baseball player all this came with a price. He was receiving death threats and racial remarks while he played. But he was never scared or worried. He new things would blow over and he would be out of the limelight. The major themes in this book it to show the reader that anything is possible and you can do whatever you want to as long as you put the effort in. I liked how inspiring this book was and how the players got to share what their favorite day was when they might have done something better but like Ken Griffey Jr's best day was playing with his dad not winning the World Series. But I also thought that they left out a lot of other great players and I would have like to read what their favorite day was. Someone should read this because it shows that even the pros life outside of baseball is just like ours and anyone that has the passion that the pros do can accomplish anything.