My Home Is Over Jordan

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Overview

No longer a slave now that the Civil War is over, fifteen-year-old Maddie dreams of getting an education and becoming a teacher, but she finds the reality of freedom harsh.

No longer a slave now that the Civil War is over, fifteen-year-old Maddie dreams of getting an education and becoming a teacher, but she finds the reality of freedom harsh.

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Overview

No longer a slave now that the Civil War is over, fifteen-year-old Maddie dreams of getting an education and becoming a teacher, but she finds the reality of freedom harsh.

No longer a slave now that the Civil War is over, fifteen-year-old Maddie dreams of getting an education and becoming a teacher, but she finds the reality of freedom harsh.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Uma Krishnaswami
Maddie Henry, whom we met earlier in Sound the Jubilee, is a fiesty, likeable character, and here she longs to garner the fruits of freedom. But Maddie and her family find that freedom holds risks. Maddie is brought face to face with both her dreams, and the twin realities of prejudice and hardship. Forrester turns a handy phrase - the opening sentence, with its images of Maddie and the wagon and the "skinny-hipped mules," is a winner! The characters are compelling, and the use of modified dialect adds a ring of truth. This book reads well on its own or as a sequel to Sound the Jubilee.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8--Forrester picks up the story of Maddie Henry that she began in Sound the Jubilee (Lodestar, 1995). Forced to abandon the home they had made in Roanoke when the white owners returned after the Civil War ended, the Henry family is seeking land that they can farm. Their path crosses that of another small band of former slaves who tell them of a nearby town where an enlightened plantation owner is willing to sell land to Negroes. A home of their own secured, the family finds that there are still plenty of white people who are only too ready to make life difficult, if not impossible, for them. Maddie herself has much to contend with as she tries to care for a wild orphan girl, considers a marriage proposal, and attempts to earn the money that will enable her to head north to Oberlin College. Forrester writes with a sure touch, working the historical threads neatly into her story and making Maddie come alive for readers. It is not necessary to have read the previous novel to enjoy this one, but readers are apt to like the heroine so much they will want to read the earlier book as well. Other characters are not as fully developed, but they are believable as people. Smoothly written and evocative of its time, this book will find a ready audience among history lovers.--Elaine Fort Weischedel, Turner Free Library, Randolph, MA
Kirkus Reviews
A sequel to Sound the Jubilee (1995, not reviewed) that does not stand on its own, but which will be welcomed by readers of the first book.

With the Civil War over, Maddie Henry and her family are free and hope to work their own land. But the small town of Willoughby, North Carolina, where they settle, is not exactly welcoming, and some of the young black men seem as determined to stir up trouble as the belligerent whites are. All Maddie wants is to continue her education, but she is tied down by Tibby, a mixed-race child whom she finds running wild in the woods, and to whom she becomes a sort of mother. Forrester assumes a knowledge of the characters and their relationships, and jumps right into the story without much explanation; still, readers of the earlier book will appreciate the author's willingness to allow for moral complexity: While some of the characters are either all good or all bad, neither blacks nor whites as a group are, and in the rebuilding of the South, there is blame and praise enough to go around.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780525675686
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/1/1997
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 160
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Lexile: 640L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.78 (w) x 8.56 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2001

    My Home is Over Jordan Book Review

    My Home is Over Jordan is a sequal to Sound the Julibee. It shows Maddie Henry and her family's struggles as they find a new home, and a new life. It gave a sense of the time period by showing the ups and downs of a freed slave's life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2000

    Good book, I recommend it

    This book was good. It made me think about what it was really like after the Civil war. There were two big prejudice scenes in this story. One of them is when Mama and her family have just moved to a new town after the Civil War. Some men come riding to her house holding torches and ride around shouting bad things about black people. Then just before they leave, they break the only window Mama has in the house. The other story is when Jane the teacher is tied to a tree and gets her hair cut off because the white men don¿t think that blacks are worthy enough to have a teacher. Even though most white people despised black people, there were still some people in the south who didn¿t think the color of the skin mattered. I think the book shows how some blacks and whites can get along. Mr. Loftis a character in the book sold land to Mama after the Civil War but he also sold land to blacks before the civil war was over.

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