My Kid's Allergic to Everything Dessert Cookbook: More Than 100 Recipes for Sweets & Treats the Whole Family Will Enjoy

My Kid's Allergic to Everything Dessert Cookbook: More Than 100 Recipes for Sweets & Treats the Whole Family Will Enjoy

by Mary Harris
     
 

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Created with the idea that a child's diet should be healthy and fun, this inviting and easy-to-use cookbook features more than 100 delicious allergy-free dessert recipes that exclude common allergens such as corn, cow's milk, egg, peanuts, and wheat. From birthday cakes and cupcakes to chocolate-chip cookies and banana cream pie, these recipes expertly

Overview

Created with the idea that a child's diet should be healthy and fun, this inviting and easy-to-use cookbook features more than 100 delicious allergy-free dessert recipes that exclude common allergens such as corn, cow's milk, egg, peanuts, and wheat. From birthday cakes and cupcakes to chocolate-chip cookies and banana cream pie, these recipes expertly substitute rye flour, carob, almond milk, and other ingredients for foods children may be allergic to. This second edition includes updated substitution charts enabling any cook to convert family favorite recipes into allergen-free delights, and a buying guide shows where to find special ingredients. In addition to desserts, a chapter covering breakfast ideas includes recipes for pancakes, smoothies, waffles, and granola bars. This cookbook also addresses the allergy and environmental food concerns that parents and caregivers face today as more and more children are diagnosed with multiple food allergies. Helpful tips cover how to avoid allergic foods while traveling, great snacks to take along for the ride, and how to create an allergy-free home.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781613740774
Publisher:
Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/01/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
File size:
4 MB

Read an Excerpt

My Kid's Allergic to Everything Dessert Cookbook

More than 100 Recipes for Sweets & Treats the Whole Family Will Enjoy


By Mary Harris, Wilma Selzer Nachsin

Chicago Review Press Incorporated

Copyright © 2010 Wilma Selzer Nachsin and Mary Harris
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-61374-077-4



CHAPTER 1

Know Your Flours and Their Alter Egos


Using alternative flours can be very confusing and scary. We live in a world full of prepackaged box mixes for pancakes, cakes, and muffins — when we were faced with using alternative flours and ingredients, we were thrown for a loop! What can be used in place of bleached, enriched flour made from wheat for a birthday cake? After the initial panic died down, we realized that there are many flours made from grains and seeds that are just as easy to use as wheat, but the slightly different qualities (such as lower or absent gluten content) made finding the right proportions difficult. We explored many helpful resources, such as the University of Wisconsin's and University of Illinois's Extension Offices, diet books, and health food stores' employees, but in the long run the best teacher was experience. The charts in this chapter provide general information about using and combining these flours. However, certain flours work better than others when preparing a variety of baked goods. For your convenience, we have provided specific combination charts listing flours that work best for each category of baked goods that appear in this book. In each recipe's list of ingredients, we have put the ingredient which works best first, for example, oat flour or spelt flour or amaranth flour. This means we have achieved the tastiest results with oat flour, but have also been successful using the other flours. If there is only one ingredient listed in a line, this means we have not found (or do not need) any alternatives.

If you are dealing with a gluten allergy or intolerance, a yeast allergy, or celiac disease, there are a wide variety of resources available. We were fortunate in not having to deal with that severe medical problem, and our hearts are with you. There are some gluten-free recipes scattered throughout, such as Orange Snaps and Coconut Pancakes. Several resources are listed in chapter 13, such as www.landolakes.com for our favorite gluten-free flour mixture, which is suitable for substitution in many of your favorite recipes.

Gluten is the elastic component in many grains that reacts with liquids and yeast in the unbaked dough, expanding and forming a network of tiny expandable pockets that trap the carbon dioxide created during the leavening process, thus making the dough rise. Because wheat gluten is the stickiest and most elastic of all grain glutens, it sets the standard for ease of preparation and rising in breads and other baked goods.

Yeast is a fungus that produces the carbon dioxide during fermentation. It continually reproduces itself, feeding off gluten and sugars.

Gluten and yeast, singly or together, give the baked products their lighter texture and weight. Nongluten flours do not feed yeast at all; therefore rising must be forced by either adding a gluten flour to the nongluten flour in the recipe or by using a lot more of a different leavening agent, such as baking powder or baking soda, with an acidic ingredient.

Wheat and corn flour are used in many products under many different names. When a label indicates that modified food starch or a thickening agent has been used, you may assume that wheat or corn in some form has been added. Surprisingly, even some candies, such as licorice, use wheat flour as a thickener and stiffener. Other ingredient and trademark names that include wheat are: bran, bread crumbs, bulgur or burghol, couscous, cracker meal, durum, farina, many forms of "filler," gluten, graham, HVP (hydrolyzed vegetable protein), kamut, many types of modified food starch, MSG, orzo, pumpernickel, seitan, semolina, tabouleh, teff, some varieties of tempeh, wheat germ, some forms of yeast, Accent, and Postum. Corn and its other names are discussed in chapter 3. Family names are listed in the appendices.

Following are two lists of flours, gluten and nongluten. Almost all of our recipes require some gluten in order to obtain a well-baked and tasty dessert. Generally, you will get a better product using mostly gluten flours. If you are dealing with a gluten allergy or intolerance or celiac disease, the nongluten flour mixture from Land o' Lakes (see page 171) combined with guar gum is a wonderful substitute for gluten flours.


GLUTEN AND "STICKY" FLOURS

This list is of flours we use in baked goods. There is a variety of research regarding the gluten content of some of these flours. See our Resources chapter (page 169) for more information on how to find the right products for your home.


Amaranth

Made from the ground grains of the amaranth plant, it is in the Amaranth family (some Amaranth species do not produce edible seeds or grain). It ranges from an off-white to near-black color and has a bland flavor. It works well used as a coating and for baking, and the cooked whole grains may be used in salads. Other varieties of this family are grown for the green leaves, which may be cooked and eaten like spinach and are commonly known as pigweed. The flour is high in protein, calcium, fiber, and B vitamins.


Barley

Made from the ground grain of barley plants, it is in the Grass family. It is commonly used in the manufacture of malt. It has a white color and a mild flavor; it does not work well as a coating or for thickening gravies and sauces. It works well for baking, especially when mixed with a flour that bakes a heavier or denser product, such as rye or buckwheat.


Buckwheat (dark)

Made from the ground grain of the buckwheat plant. In spite of its name, it is not related to the Grass family, but belongs to the Buckwheat family, which includes rhubarb and sorrel. It has a medium brown color and a strong nutty flavor. It works well for a dark crispy coating, and when mixed with other flours it will give a solid texture to baked goods. It is not good for thickening sauces and gravies or for making a roux.


Buckwheat (light)

Made from the unroasted ground grain of the buckwheat plant. It belongs to the same family as the dark buckwheat and differs only in the preparation of the flour. The flavor can vary from mild to strong, and it has a light brown color. It is good for baking and for use as a coating, producing a medium-weight, dry product, but it is not good for thickening sauces and gravies or for making a roux.


Chickpea/Garbanzo Bean

Made from the dried, ground seeds of the chickpea plant, it is in the Bean family. It has a pale yellow color and a mild flavor. It is only fair for coating, but is excellent for thickening sauces and gravies. It can be used for baked goods but only when it is one quarter or less of the total flour used (e.g., ¼ cup chickpea flour with ¾ cup other flours).


Kamut

Made from ground grain of the kamut plant, it is a Triticum in the Grass family. Kamut is the Egyptian word for wheat; it is an ancient, nonhybridized form of wheat. It has an off-white color and a mild flavor. It is good when used for coating, but not for thickening sauces and gravies or for making a roux. It works very well for baking.


Millet

Made from the ground grain of the pearl millet plant, it is in the Grass family. It has an off-white color and a very mild flavor. It works for coating, although not as well as some other flours, and does not work well for thickening sauces and gravies or for making a roux. It is very good for baking, especially when mixed with other, more glutinous flours.


Oat

Made from the ground kernels of the oat plant, it is in the Grass family. It has an off-white to gray color and a mild flavor. It is very good for coating, for thickening sauces and gravies, and for making a roux. It is also excellent for baking, especially when mixed at a 3:1 ratio with another flour such as arrowroot or potato (e.g., ¾ cup oat flour with ¼ cup potato flour). *Note: rolled oats (heated and flattened kernels) are gluten-free.


Potato

Made from the cooked, dried, and ground tuber, it is in the Potato family. It has a white color and no flavor. Potato flour is not recommended for coating, but is very good for thickening sauces and gravies. In baking, it works best when mixed with another flour and can be used for up to half of the total flour used. Note that potato flour and potato starch are different and react in different ways when used. Do not substitute one for the other.


Quinoa

Made from the roasted, ground seeds of the quinoa plant, it is in the Goosefoot family. It has an ivory color and a bland flavor in very small amounts. The flavor and aroma are much stronger and yeasty when used as half or more of the total flour used. It does not work well for coating, thickening sauces and gravies, or for making a roux. It works extremely well for muffins or loaf cakes, especially when mixed with another gluten flour.


Rye

Made from the roasted, ground grain of the rye plant, it is in the Grass family. It has a very dark brown color and a strong, almost yeasty flavor. It works well as a coating but has too strong a flavor to use as a thickener for sauces and gravies or for making a roux. It works extremely well for breads and some cakes, such as carrot or zucchini, but not as well for cookies or more delicate baked goods.


Spelt

Made from ground grain of the spelt plant, it is in the nonhybridized Grass family. It has an ivory to white color and a bland taste. It works extremely well for baking but not as well for thickening or coating.


Teff

Made from the ground grain of the teff plant, it is a Triticum in the Grass family closely related to wheat. It has a medium to dark color, a coarse texture, and a mild flavor. It works well for baking but not as well for coating, for thickening sauces and gravies, or for making a roux.


NONGLUTEN FLOURS

Arrowroot

Made from the dried, ground West Indian arrowroot tuber, it is in the Marantaceae family. It has a snow-white color and no flavor. It can be used for a crispy, quick-cooking coating and works very well as a thickening agent. Small amounts may also be added to gluten flours for baking. In catalogs or on packaging, it may be called "flour," "powder," or "starch"; we have found no discernible differences, and in this book we call it arrowroot flour.


Coconut Flour

Made from fresh coconut meat that is dried and ground into a powder, it is in the Palm family. It has a snow-white color and a mild, slightly sweet flavor. It is good for baking. Because it is a nongluten flour, we recommend using additional leavening agents such as adding 1½ teaspoons Ener-G Egg Replacer powder mixed with 2 tablespoons water for each ounce of coconut flour used. It makes light, delicious pancakes and baked goods with a hint of coconut flavor.


Rice

Made from the dried, ground kernels of rice plants, it is in the Grass family. Flours milled from brown and from refined white rice are available; the colors range from white to light brown, and all have a mild flavor. It is not good for coating unless you are preparing tempura batter. It works best in baked goods when mixed with other flours and will impart a light, silky texture to the product.


Soy

Made from the roasted, dried, ground soybean, it is in the Bean family. It works well when used for coating, but not for thickening. It is good for baking used at a 1:3 ratio (e.g., ¼ cup soy flour with ¾ cup other flours). Make sure the flour you purchase has been made from already-roasted soybeans. Because soy has a higher oil content than other flours, you may wish to reduce the margarine/oil called for in a recipe by 1 teaspoon for each ¼ cup soy flour used. It will give a silky, almost puddinglike texture to your baked goods. Soy has also been determined to be a common allergen, so daily use is not recommended.


Tapioca

Made from the cooked, ground cassava root, it is from the Spurge family. Depending on the recipe, it may be helpful to dissolve the tapioca pearls in hot or cold water before using; see container for helpful hints. There are a variety of tapiocas available; small pearled quick-cooking tapioca was used in creating these recipes. Use 4 teaspoons tapioca for each 1 tablespoon cornstarch used in recipe.


"STICKY" FLOURS CHART

The more "sticky" a flour is, the more likely it is to behave like a gluten flour. Based on our experience and from information gleaned from many sources, we have developed the following list of flours and how they behave during the baking process.


GENERAL SUBSTITUTIONS AND AMOUNTS

The following charts describe general rules for substituting alternative flours for each 1 cup of bleached, enriched flour made from wheat, or 1 cup of whole wheat flour.


GENERAL FLOUR SUBSTITUTION CHART FOR ANY RECIPE

¼ cup amaranth flour and ¾ cup oat flour
1 cup to 1 ¼ cups rye flour
¼ to ½ cup buckwheat flour and ½ cup amaranth flour
5/8 to 1 cup potato flour
1 cup oat flour
½ to 2/3 cup barley flour and ½ cup oat flour
½ cup potato flour and ½ cup rye flour
5/8 cup rice flour and 1/3 cup rye flour
1 cup soy flour plus ¾ cup potato starch


GENERAL FLOUR SUBSTITUTION CHART FOR BAKED GOODS

These proportions may not look like they would work, but due to the different families, classes, and characteristics of these grains, they do. Please note that all the alternative flours react differently with each other; you may want to experiment to find the best combinations for your own cooking and baking needs.

One helpful hint is to add a little more leavening (such as baking powder, baking soda, egg yolk, or egg substitute) if a coarser flour rather than a finer flour is used. A good rule of thumb is 2 ½ teaspoons of additional baking powder or an equivalent substitute for each 1 cup of coarse flour used.

Another suggestion is to let the batter or dough sit for a few minutes after all ingredients have been thoroughly mixed to allow the alternative flours to absorb any liquids; this helps the flours expand and rise a little better when baking.

As you become more proficient in mixing your favorite recipes and using your favorite flours you will develop a feel for when your dough is the right consistency for a well-baked product.

Appendix I lists the scientific and family names for the grains and flours referred to in this cookbook. Appendix II describes the different food families. A food family is a botanical classification of foods that are related first by the flower structure and second by genetic structure. A person with an allergy to one member of a specific food family may also be allergic to other foods in the same family. If your child is allergic to one food in a particular family, check with your doctor before using other members of that food family.

Following are more detailed charts that correspond to the recipe chapters for specific substitutions and combinations of alternative flours that we have discovered work best for cookies, cakes, fruit desserts, and crusts.


CAKE AND CUPCAKE FLOUR CHART (part 1)

These are suggested combinations of flours that work well for light tasting and less dense cakes. All combinations are for 1 cup.

NO means the flour alone or that combination of flours is not appropriate for a good cake.

OK means the flour may be used by itself and does not require another flour in addition to it.

ANY COMB. means any ratio of the two flours that adds up to 1 cup will make a good cake.


CAKE AND CUPCAKE FLOUR CHART (part 2)

These are suggested combinations of flours that work well for light tasting and less dense cakes. All combinations are for 1 cup.

NO means the flour alone or that combination of flours is not appropriate for a good cake.

OK means the flour may be used by itself and does not require another flour in addition to it.

ANY COMB. means any ratio of the two flours that adds up to 1 cup will make a good cake.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from My Kid's Allergic to Everything Dessert Cookbook by Mary Harris, Wilma Selzer Nachsin. Copyright © 2010 Wilma Selzer Nachsin and Mary Harris. Excerpted by permission of Chicago Review Press Incorporated.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Wilma Selzer Nachsin has a master’s degrees in home economics education and consumer education and is a life and career coach. Mary Harris is a freelance writer. Her two children have a family history of asthma and food sensitivities. Rebecca S. Hoffman, M.D., is board-certified in allergy and clinical immunology and maintains a private practice in Chicago, Illinois. She resides in Evanston, Illinois. Dr. Ida Mary S. Thoma received her Ph.D. in microbiology from Rutgers University.

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