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My Lady Jane
     

My Lady Jane

4.6 24
by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, Jodi Meadows
 

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New York Times Bestseller
Publishers Weekly Best Young Adult Book of 2016
• Bustle Best Young Adult Book of 2016
• YALSA 2017 Best Fiction for Young Adults

This comical, fantastical, romantical, New York Times bestselling, (not) entirely true story of Lady Jane Grey is “an uproarious

Overview

New York Times Bestseller
Publishers Weekly Best Young Adult Book of 2016
• Bustle Best Young Adult Book of 2016
• YALSA 2017 Best Fiction for Young Adults

This comical, fantastical, romantical, New York Times bestselling, (not) entirely true story of Lady Jane Grey is “an uproarious historical fantasy that’s not to be missed” (Publishers Weekly, starred review). In My Lady Jane, coauthors Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows have created a one-of-a-kind YA fantasy in the tradition of The Princess Bride, featuring a reluctant king, an even more reluctant queen, a noble steed, and only a passing resemblance to actual history—because sometimes history needs a little help.

At sixteen, Lady Jane Grey is about to be married off to a stranger and caught up in a conspiracy to rob her cousin, King Edward, of his throne. But those trifling problems aren’t for Jane to worry about. Jane gets to be Queen of England.

Like that could go wrong.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 04/18/2016
Hand (the Unearthly series), Ashton (the Everneath series), and Meadows (the Orphan Queen series) clearly had a ball working on this joyous rewrite of the story of Lady Jane Grey and King Edward VI, and readers will have just as much fun with it. The authors follow history to the point of tragedy, then toss it aside to allow love and good to triumph. One significant tweak is the creation of a shape-shifting people called E∂ians, such as Jane’s new husband, Lord Gifford Dudley, who spends his days as a horse and his nights as a man. This version of England is full of E∂ians, and Edward’s power-hungry sister Mary (aka Bloody Mary) is one of the Verities who want to purge the country of them. Alternating third-person narration scrolls smoothly among Edward, Jane, and Gifford in chapters packed with hilarious banter, authorial asides, and polite avoidance of nudity as characters shift into and out of animal forms at inopportune moments. It’s an uproarious historical fantasy that’s not to be missed. Ages 13–up. Agent: (for Hand) Katherine Fausset, Curtis Brown; (for Ashton) Michael Bourret, Dystel & Goderich Literary Management; (for Meadows) Lauren MacLeod, Strothman Agency. (June)
VOYA, August 2016 (Vol. 39, No. 3) - Barbara Johnston
In 1553, Edians, who have transformational powers, and Verities, who do not but control England, are in opposition. Edward VI is king, and he and his cousin Lady Jane Grey are best friends. On his death bed, Edward follows Lord Dudley’s advice and decrees that the crown shall pass to Lady Jane. Dudley’s son Gifford (“G”) is quickly married to Jane who discovers G is an Edian who transforms into a horse from dawn to dusk. When Lord Dudley announces Edward’s demise, the reluctant Jane becomes queen while Edward’s sister, Mary, gathers an army in protest. Edward rallies (thanks to a poison antidote), and Jane and he unearth their inner Edian magic and collaborate with G to foil his father’s nefarious plot. Ultimately, Edward abdicates his throne and joins the Pack, led by the bewitching Gracie, and Jane and Gifford experience their wedding night’s “very special hug.” Elizabeth is crowned queen and history marches forward. All three narrators—Edward, Jane, and Gifford—are delightful. G, the supposed “skirt chaser” is hilarious as fledgling poet, sometimes spouting Shakespeare before the Bard’s birth. Jane is a well-read, take-charge heroine who changes into a fearless ferret, and wimpy Edward discards his royal privilege to forge his own destiny. Three cheers for this well-written and rollicking revision of history full of timely mannerisms and bold adventure. Its length may deter some readers but those who enjoy clever humor, colorful fantasy, and light romance will savor each page. Reviewer: Barbara Johnston; Ages 11 to 18.
School Library Journal
05/01/2016
Gr 9 Up—In real life, Edward VI and Lady Jane Grey died young in 16th-century England. Here, Edward and Jane get another chance at happiness thanks to the irrepressible imaginations of the authors. Adventure, intrigue, humor, and romance abound—so, too, does high fantasy. England is a place where people (including royalty) are either EÐians (those who can shape-shift) or Verities (those who cannot). Because many Verities believe EÐian magic is evil, they set about to obliterate it. EÐians retaliate. Also, someone keeps poisoning the king's food. The plot, then, involves Edward, Jane, and their allies trying to figure out how to keep peace in the kingdom, find out who is poisoning the king's food, and restore Edward to the throne (he is presumed dead and gads about incognito for part of the book). EÐian "facts" are woven in with such subtle assurance that they come across as a genuine part of English history. For instance, the year the volatile Henry VIII discovered his leonine animal form and devoured the court jester is known in the kingdom's collective memory as the Year of the Lion. Wisecracks are prevalent, which would be grating after a while if the characters did not fairly sparkle with the complete array of honest human qualities. Readers will need to know the basic backstory of Lady Jane Grey and Edward VI. VERDICT A great choice for those who enjoy lighthearted, alternative history adventures and romance.—Jennifer Prince, Buncombe County Public Libraries, NC
Kirkus Reviews
2016-03-16
Lady Jane Grey's nine days as queen are reimagined as a tongue-in-cheek shape-shifter romance. Between the reigns of adolescent King Edward VI and his bloodthirsty half sister, Mary I, England was ruled for nine days by doomed Lady Jane, a 16-year-old political pawn—or that's how it went in our world. In the world of this novel, both Edward and Jane have happier endings. Instead of Catholics and Protestants, England is torn between the Eðians, who shape-shift into animals, and the Verities, who loathe them. As in reality, Jane is wed to Gifford (Guildford in history) Dudley, installed as queen, and imprisoned by Mary. However, this Jane and Gifford escape their executions through animal magic. It's inconvenient for the newlyweds' sex life that Gifford spends every dawn to dusk as a horse, but it's also terribly convenient for frantic escapes from Mary's soldiers. Fourth-wall-breaking and pop-culture references that span from Shakespeare to Game of Thrones show signs of strain, especially the many references to The Princess Bride (1973). The latter, sometimes layered one atop the other without a break, merely highlight this book's contrast with the classic's stellar comic timing; perhaps it's for the best that few teen readers will be familiar with either the decades-old film or even older book. Joan Aiken or Terry Pratchett this ain't, but the lightweight, gleefully anachronistic comedy will entertain with its cast of likable heroes and buffoonish villains. (Fantasy. 13-17)
Tahereh Mafi
“The Tudors meets Monty Python. Prepare to laugh and gasp and clutch your pearls.”
Jessica Day George
“History, humor, and unexpected magic come together in this marvelous story.”
Booklist (starred review)
“Wacky, irreverent, and just plain fun. This fantasy-adventure politely tips its hat to history before joyfully punting it out of the way. An utter delight.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062391742
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/07/2016
Pages:
512
Sales rank:
15,127
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.90(d)
Lexile:
HL760L (what's this?)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Cynthia Hand is the New York Times bestselling author of the Unearthly trilogy, The Last Time We Say Goodbye, and My Lady Jane (with Brodi Ashton and Jodi Meadows). Before turning to writing for young adults, Cynthia studied literary fiction, and earned both an MFA and a PhD in fiction writing. She currently resides in Idaho, where she teaches creative writing at Boise State University. Visit her online at www.cynthiahandbooks.com.

BRODI ASHTON is also the author of Everneath, a VOYA Perfect 10 for 2011; Everbound; and Evertrue; and the coauthor, with Cynthia Hand and Jodi Meadows, of My Lady Jane. She received a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Utah and a master’s degree in international relations from the London School of Economics. Brodi lives in Utah with her family. You can visit her online at www.brodiashton.blogspot.com

Jodi Meadows is the author of the Incarnate series and The Orphan Queen. She lives and writes in the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, with her husband, a cat, and an alarming number of ferrets. She is a confessed book addict and has wanted to be a writer ever since she decided against becoming an astronaut.

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My Lady Jane 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
ShannonAThompson 20 days ago
This book was everything I needed and more. With everything that is going on in the world, curling up with a comedy story really made my week. If you love fantasy, history, comedy, and breaking of the 4th wall, this book is for you. My Lady Jane is a “revised” history story following King Edward VI and the nine-day rule of Lady Jane Grey. In real life, Edward VI and Jane died in 16th-century England, but I gotta say, I love this crazy (and often furry) tale a lot more. Where King Edward VI tried to put his cousin on the throne due to religious reasons in real life, this King Edward VI was trying to protect magical beasts. This is the “secret” history. The one where people are Eðian or not, and an Eðian is a person who can shift into an animal. Eðians are also condemned, more often than not, and it depends on who’s sitting on the throne. Hence all the crazy politics. The story is full of wit, sarcasm, and absolute adventure. But don’t expect much historical truth here. (But do expect the three awesome authors to break the 4th wall by talking to you, the reader, directly.) This collaboration is seamless. And you will laugh the entire way through. I’m basically recommending this to everyone. ~SAT Recommended to: Everyone! No, really. It’s hilarious. But more specifically, if you like light-hearted, funny fantasy reads rooted in “history”, you will enjoy this book. Favorite Quote: Armies aren’t very good about carrying libraries with them. I can’t imagine why. We’d fight so much less if everyone would just sit down and read. (pg. 427) Favorite Word: Pusillanimous: showing a lack of courage or determination; timid: I might not be able to beat a weapons master, but I can easily best an old, top-heavy, pusillanimous, two-faced, paltry, odorous excuse for a man. (pg. 459)
Anonymous 21 days ago
Couldn't put this down. A fun, fast paced read. Loved the twisted history and the happy endings.
Anonymous 4 months ago
This was great fun to read! And it paralleled history so well. I kept meaning to go to bed, but kept reading instead. You will love this book!
Anonymous 4 months ago
Charming and funny, My Lady Jane retells Tudor history in a fresh and fun way. Elements of magic and humor combine, and though the story is a little cheesy at times, it keeps you from putting the book down. The style has many inside jokes for history lovers, but you don't have to know too much about history to truly enjoy this book. The story also rewrites history a little, but it only improves the story. 10/10 would recommend.
terferj 7 months ago
Oh how I loved this. I found it amusing, fun, lovely, and fantastic. I also loved everything about it from the characters, the pacing, and the different take on their history. I wish all history lessons was written like this, then maybe I would have paid more attention to it in school. Haha. I like that it had a “The Emperor’s New Groove” feel to it. I say that because the narrators kept interrupting to add tidbits. It was great. I liked that it was “loosely” based on Lady Jane and the crew because I liked the happy ending instead of what really happened because it sucked for them. I also liked how the religion aspect of their real time period was turned into people being E∂ians and Verities. Very clever. I would so totally want to be an E∂ian. I liked the alternating chapters between Edward, Jane, and Gifford aka G. I just want to squeeze them all because I love them so. I loved the horse puns that Jane kept spouting, the awful poetry G kept thinking of, and the silly things Edward thought about. The supporting characters were great too. They were such a great addition to the story and the story wouldn’t have been as it was without them. I loved how there is three authors but I couldn’t tell who wrote what. The writing is so perfectly blended. I do have the suspicions that Jodi wrote the ferret parts though. Ha! So, yes it was wonderful and it’s has been placed among my favorites. ♥
Stephanie Young 8 months ago
WOW!!! What a unique way to bring history to life! Cynthia, Brodi, and Jodi worked so well together. I received the book from OwlCrate, and I began reading it as soon as I read the description on the back. Lady Jane Grey is a super sassy, intelligent, sixteen year old. What she does not realize is she is going to become queen, and will have to marry a stranger. Her cousin, King Edward, is very ill. He chose her to take his place on the throne. She does not want to become queen, nor does she want to marry. This book mixes history, magic, love, and laughter to turn it into a wonderful page turner. I read My Lady Jane in a day. I promise you will love this book! Some characters have a special ability, and those who do not want them all dead. As it says on the cover, "it's not easy being queen"! Go out and read this book!
Anonymous 8 months ago
So funny and creative! A great collaboration between authors. Thank you for giving Jane the happy ending she deserves! I hope you'll work together again!
BookPrincessBlog 9 months ago
In a very strange turn of events, I ended up loving this book. Why strange, you ask? Because I had basically DNF'd every one of the authors' books beforehand; no, really, I'm serious. I couldn't get into Unearthly by Cynthia, couldn't get into Everneath by Brodi, and was super duper on the fence and oddly weirded out by Incarnate by Jodi. Let's just say I was more than worried about what I was going to get myself into when I saw all three of their names smushed together on this one book. However they greatly proved me wrong and the combo of these three authors was lethal. The narration was so seamless and readable that I never could've told you that it was written be three different people besides the fact that it told me on the cover. I flew through this in about three days due to the writers' ability to craft an excellent story. I will say that I was quite leary of this book when it first came out and not just because of my experiences with the previous works. Any book that totes itself the second coming of The Princess Bride, I grow scared. TBP is sacred to me, and when I first started reading, it felt a bit forced, like it was trying wayyyyy too hard. That first little introduction reminded me so much of what Goldman did in his story with all his little asides about how Morgenstern really wrote it and it wasn't his fault for having it wrote like that. I was very worried they were going to keep that throughout, and it was enough to keep me from buying it when it first came out. As I kept going, whether it was from my contemporary feels that I had been in or the slowness of adjusting to this fantasy world, I felt it started off a bit slow and I was pretty much going for a four star review. However, right around the part 2 of the book, everything after that was absolute beauty. So much hilarity that I was left in a constant smirk or smile and binge read the entire book. I loved each character and they were all unique in their characterization and personality. The humor was right on and the plot was quite interesting. A lot of this review was showing my hesitancy for this book; however, the truth is I had no need to worry. Each of the authors have crafted their writing wonderfully since the last time that I have read their work. This book is a lot of fun, and it has become a favorite of mine. If you are looking for a book to fill the inevitable hole that The Princess Bride has left in your heart, this book could do it for you - although nothing will ever compare to that beauty of a book. Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and even for the parts I was on the fence about, the last parts of it made up for everything. I will definitely be looking out for these authors in the future.Five stars for sure, and this Book Princess decrees that you get your butt out there and read this book! Check out more of my thoughts: https://bookprincessreviews.wordpress.com/
Anonymous 11 months ago
Beautifully wriiten, funny, and unpredictable book by 3 authors whose books i am now eager to read! Write another together, My Ladies, please!
JessicaCoffee 12 months ago
4.5 stars. Loved this take on "historical events". The authors were great in their narration, and the up-to-date (and older) cultural references were great. Not only that, but the banter between characters continually had me laughing. (Neigh. That's all I have to say. Haha) I loved the twist in everything, the character development, the humor, the relationships. The pace remained fast, regardless of the set-ups and often point-of-view changes, and FYI, those POVs were never frustrating or confusing. They helped make the book great! If you like historical reads, humor, fantasy, YA, animals (horses, especially), royal hierarchy, or new takes on old tales, I highly recommend that you check out MY LADY JANE.
Bookish-Bakes 12 months ago
This book was nothing that I expected, but everything that I hoped for and more! From the clever jokes to the movie references to Jane herself, this book was wonderful and hilarious. I had received it in the mail months before in my Uppercase Box, and I had heard good things about Lady Jane. However, I had not taken the time to read it myself until just recently. Hand, Ashton, and Meadows make this book seem so effortless. If I didn’t know any better, I would have assumed that it was written by one author and not three. I haven’t read any of their works, before Jane, so I didn’t know what to expect. If their other books are as good as Jane, I can be sure that I’ll have many adventures ahead of me. Though you would think that the story revolves solely around Jane, the chapters alternate between the three main characters. All three were very interesting, but it was Jane alone who held my attention the most with her passion for books and tendency to be branded as odd. As a reader, woman, and Bookstagrammer, I found myself relating to her the most out of the three. Even when she is born in a society and time period that keeps women under the thumb so to speak, she finds ways to push against the rules and stand up for her rights as a woman. Even when being forced into marriage, she finds ways to one up her husband and keep him on his toes. The relationship between her and G was not only believable but thrilling. Simply, they were adorable. Don’t believe me? Just wait until you get to page one-twenty and you will see what I mean. The fact that this world has magical animal people makes it all the more interesting. Watching the characters learn their animal identities had me wishing that I too could someday fly away like a bird. I’ll admit that I was a bit leery at first. After reading, The Shadow Queen, a book with dragons that become humans, I felt nearly ruined for reading anything else with shape shifters. However, this book took the typical magic and made it into a hilarious parody that I could picture so clearly in my head that you would have thought it was a movie. Considering that fantasy and historical fiction are my two favorites, you can believe me when I say that this book is unlike anything I have ever read. Lady Jane has the perfect mix of history, magic, and subtle humor making it a feel good story that you’ll want to revisit again and again. While Edward comes off as the stereotypical chauvinist, it is clear that there is hope for the poor young boy. I’m convinced had he been raised in our century, he would have been a completely different man. While he constantly makes remarks about women being inferior, there is a love in his heart for them that cannot be overlooked. His character though very naïve at times is still likable. Even when he thinks that letting a woman save you makes you a lesser man, I couldn’t help loving his part in the story. Instead of being angry, I found myself laughing out loud. This book really does bring focus to all the hilarious and odd beliefs and practices of their time. If you are a young adult fan, then you must give this book a try. From Jane and Gifford’s awkwardness over their special “hug” to Edwards struggling to let a woman one up him, their journey to save the throne is so enjoyable and comical. With movie references to the one and only Monty Python to subtle jokes about wordplay and words not existing yet, this book just had me smiling for days. As a feel good story, you are bound to fi
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
Edward (King of England, teenage boy, lover of blackberries, and dogs) is dying. Before he has a chance to kiss a girl or do much of anything with his tragically short life. Edward would like to wallow about his pending demise thanks to "the Affliction" but instead he's facing a lot of pressure to secure his line of succession. Unsure if he can trust his sister Bess with the crown, and positive he can't trust his blood-thirsty sister Mary, Edward's only option seems to be his cousin. Jane. Lady Jane Grey has little interest in marriage or the crown. But faced with a royal decree arranging her marriage, she has little choice but to comply. When she ends up married to Lord Gifford Dudley--an aspiring poet by night and a horse by day thanks to his uncontrolled Eðian (eth-y-un) magic--she is resigned to a quiet life with a husband who may or may not be horrible. Then Jane's dear cousin Edward dies (or does he?) setting off a hectic nine days with Jane in the throne and, eventually, on the run with her new husband in My Lady Jane (2016) by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows. My Lady Jane is a delightful historical fantasy co-written by three authors (who will be writing at least two more "Jane" books about other famous Janes in history). The novel alternates first-person narration between Edward, Jane, and G. The authors start the book with a preface explaining that this book offers an alternate (and true, according to them) history of England and Lady Jane Grey. The authors don't expand upon what they changed but interested readers can easily research the key players online. The addition of shape-shifter magic works surprisingly well within the context of English politics at the time. My Lady Jane is a page-turner filled with adventure, action, sweet romance, and even some magic. recommended. Possible Pairings: Etiquette & Espionage by Gail Carriger, The Princess Bride by William Goldman, The Dark Days Club by Alison Goodman, These Vicious Masks by Tarun Shanker and Kelly Zekas, Sorcery and Cecelia by Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevemer
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
Edward (King of England, teenage boy, lover of blackberries, and dogs) is dying. Before he has a chance to kiss a girl or do much of anything with his tragically short life. Edward would like to wallow about his pending demise thanks to "the Affliction" but instead he's facing a lot of pressure to secure his line of succession. Unsure if he can trust his sister Bess with the crown, and positive he can't trust his blood-thirsty sister Mary, Edward's only option seems to be his cousin. Jane. Lady Jane Grey has little interest in marriage or the crown. But faced with a royal decree arranging her marriage, she has little choice but to comply. When she ends up married to Lord Gifford Dudley--an aspiring poet by night and a horse by day thanks to his uncontrolled Eðian (eth-y-un) magic--she is resigned to a quiet life with a husband who may or may not be horrible. Then Jane's dear cousin Edward dies (or does he?) setting off a hectic nine days with Jane in the throne and, eventually, on the run with her new husband in My Lady Jane (2016) by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows. My Lady Jane is a delightful historical fantasy co-written by three authors (who will be writing at least two more "Jane" books about other famous Janes in history). The novel alternates first-person narration between Edward, Jane, and G. The authors start the book with a preface explaining that this book offers an alternate (and true, according to them) history of England and Lady Jane Grey. The authors don't expand upon what they changed but interested readers can easily research the key players online. The addition of shape-shifter magic works surprisingly well within the context of English politics at the time. My Lady Jane is a page-turner filled with adventure, action, sweet romance, and even some magic. Highly recommended. Possible Pairings: Etiquette & Espionage by Gail Carriger, The Princess Bride by William Goldman, The Dark Days Club by Alison Goodman, These Vicious Masks by Tarun Shanker and Kelly Zekas, Sorcery and Cecelia by Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevemer
ShopeSS More than 1 year ago
My Lady Jane was one of those books that took me by surprise. I went into it not knowing what to expect and when finished, was happy I made the choice to take the chance on this book. The authors took Lady Jane's story, gave it a bit of a magical/fantasy aspect, added romance, wit and humor, to give Jane the ending she deserved. Something that I especially loved that was that the main female characters in this novel were very strong and the force behind most of the tactic to regain control of the throne. Take a chance on this novel as you won't be disappointed.
mdemanatee More than 1 year ago
I have been looking forward to this books since I realized it was a thing. I love Tudor history. And I love irreverent Monty Python, Princess Bride-esque humor. I was really, really looking forward to this one. Remember that time Jane Grey was crowned queen of England for nine days following Edward’s death before Mary’s army came in and took over? And she was married to Gifford Dudley, the younger brother of Robert (Stan?) Dudley–of Elizabeth I flirtation fame? And how Gifford was a horse from dawn to dusk? Wait, what? And Edward was actually being poisoned by Dudley in order to help transfer the crown to an unknowing Gifford? And the battle in England wasn’t between religions but between those who can turn into animals and those who could not. Utterly absurd. Utterly delightful. This switched POVs between Edward, Jane, and Gifford (you know, the horse). And it was the most charming I have ever seen a fictional Gifford. Oddly enough. The most distracting change for me was the absence of Robert Dudley, or they changed his name to Stan. I recognize this is a peculiar distraction and I will probably be alone in this. This is being billed as a kind of YA Princess Bride. It is humorous, though I honestly never laughed out loud. Rather, it was a kind of joyous, light tone that kept the narrative moving. It was also full of Shakespeare references, and a few Monty Python just to mix it up (including my personal favorite Holy Grail quote “your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries.”). I did occasionally feel the jokes about Jane’s loving books more than anything did grow a bit tiresome, because they felt a little forced. Though I thought it was a good reminder how smart Jane Grey was, often Elizabeth is given all the recognition to being the smart one and an absolute exception. This was absolutely well worth the ride.
thereadingchick More than 1 year ago
My Lady Jane tells a fictional tale of Lady Jane Grey, in history crowned Queen of England for little more than a week, before being beheaded. These three authors tell a rather different story, using some historical facts such as being crowned Queen, but then veering into fantasy to rewrite Janes's future, or rather her past, into a happy ending. This young adult novel was a refreshing change from other fantasy-adventure tales in the genre. The dialog is filled with satire and humor, some of which is very modern, and told with a sly wink. I found myself smiling, and at times laughing out loud at some of the exchanges between Jane and her husband Gifford. The premise is true to history, I think. Edward, cousin to Jane, dies at an early age, having left Jane as his heir (although in this book, he doesn't die). The authors stay true to some historical facts. Edwards sister Mary, claims herself the true heir, and puts Jane in the Tower and then beheads her a week later. These authors thought Jane, a book lover, got robbed of happiness, so used fantasy to create a solution on how to save her life. Instead of religion being the catalyst, they used hatred between a race that could turn into animals, and regular old humans, who could not. Although this sounds like a very serious topic (If there were people who could turn into animals it would be!) the authors filled the dialog with humor and Jane was a sassy heroine, making the book lighthearted and rather goofy. If you enjoy a book that is part fantasy, romance and history, is filled with funny dialog and quirky characters, then this book needs to be at the top of your TBR pile. I would recommend this book based on the dialog alone, it was cleverly written and kept me on my toes. I didn't want to miss a quip or quibble!
AnneShirley06 More than 1 year ago
My Lady Jane was such a joy to read! The writing is clever and smart, the story is playful, and the characters have amazing personality. Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows have done an amazing job of making sure the writing flows through all the chapters and the reader forgets that the book has multiple authors. Interjections from the authors throughout the book add its laugh out loud humor and the banter between the characters is just fabulous. The story takes place during the reign of King Edward Tudor, prior to the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, and sexism in society abounds. Jane values her independence and commands respect from others as she works to have her voice heard. To say the forced marriage between Jane and G (please, for the sake of all things holy, don't call him Gifford) was strained would be putting it mildly. Before the relationship can develop beyond irritation and potential loathing, respect for one another must emerge. A prominent theme in the book is this shift in the views of male characters as they realize that women have just as much ability to rule and lead as men - some of them being much better suited to the leadership role. In the past, I've noticed that while I'm completely wrapped up in the romance happening in what I'm reading, when I put the book down I realize it was actually quite nauseating. Not so in My Lady Jane. I think this says a lot about the views of the authors and their desire to give Jane Grey more power and a better ending than the history books report. She is not a wilting flower but any means. Jane has earned a place as a favorite literary character. I'm definitely going to be fangirling over My Lady Jane for quite some time. The retelling of the reign of Jane Grey introduces humor into what was originally a very sad tale and even includes a little fantasy. It's going to be very difficult for me to restrain myself from running up to all of my friends and yelling, "OMG MY LADY JANE is AMAZING, go read it RIGHT NOW."
TheAngryElf More than 1 year ago
What I like: Normally I am not about history books, that class bored me to death. These three ladies changed my entire mindset though! This book is historical, funny, romantic and magical! Being a lover of books I always enjoy when magic is added anywhere. In this book, the magic is added during the reign of King Edward of England and how he is gravely ill. The main reason and the biggest reason I love this book so much is the character Jane Grey. For one she is independent, she doesn't need a man to help with anything and most of all, SHE LOVES BOOKS. I can deeply relate to her and her love of books so you could say we had an instant connection! I love how the authors portray Jane as a women who can hold herself, shows strength, bravery, and kindness all at the same time. Girl power! Throughout the book I also love how you can see Jane's character development and interactions with the different characters! I believe character development and relations is always an important and crucial part of a book. Besides Jane I love liked the character who you will come to know as G. He is confusing, funny, and genuine! I hope you like him as much as me! Reading this book makes me wish that history was actually this funny and fascinating and full of magic! This book had me laughing and squealing like a little girl! What I did not like: First of I didn't like how it ended. Not in the way that the ending was horrible but in the way that there's probably not going to be another! (Please tell me I'm wrong authors?!) I do hope that maybe they will do the same thing with different history stories? Another thing that I didn't like was that the book is from three different points of view. If you miss a chapter title or do not notice the character's name, you may become lost and confused with who is telling the story. I also do not like how it ends pretty quickly. The whole book is this amazing long story and then its the 'big battle' and the book is over. (Let's be honest I wish it never ended). If those are the biggest concerns I had then this book is near perfect! Overall: This book is historically funny and amazing! I never knew history could be changed to be interesting and funny!! I could not put this book down even if I wanted to. The characters are easy to relate to and since we already know the story (somewhat) of Lady Jane Grey, this whole new take on it is easy to pick up! I highly recommend this book for anyone who is looking for a book to make them laugh and think about how the world would really be if there was magic!
YAMixtape More than 1 year ago
I’m writing this review kind of conflicted. I started out absolutely loving this book. It was funny, it was a fast read. At some points, it felt like I was reading/watching a movie. I could just see these characters so well and their conversations were so well written. It was funny, but not ROFLMAO funny. Funnier because I got the references they were making and they were quite well done! There were a lot of references in the book to other pop culture moments from English plays, movies, etc. I was really loving it. I didn’t realize there was going to be a magical element to it, but they brought that up right away (which, btw, I LOVED the narrators bits. I loved how they’d stop action and tell us things, it was fun to have the authors break the fourth wall that way). But then I got to the middle/end area and I really kind of just wanted the book to be done. Which is such a shame, because I was loving so much of it. I really liked G and Jane. Edward was alright, his story line with Gracie was supposed to be cute feels inducing, but really I was just kind of bored by them. It also kind of felt like Gracie just didn’t belong to the story. I don’t know if she was added in later, like maybe during edits? It kind of felt that way, so I never connected at all to her. It was fun to see Edward get to his Grandmother’s house. I loved her! She felt very Olenna Tyrell. So that picked back up for me then. But I just felt like the entire part with the Pack and the bear could’ve been taken out and the story would’ve kept my attention so much better and honestly? We wouldn’t have really lost anything in the overall story. I really hate to not give this book a higher rating, because where it excelled, it did it so well! The conversations were so well done, the character development was fun, the magical parts of the story were great and worked wonderfully; it just stalled so much in the middle/end that it derailed the book. It got righted towards the end of the book, but by that point I’d read through maybe 100 – 150 pages of extra story that didn’t add much and I just wanted it to be done. I would definitely, 1000% read another book that these ladies write again and I really, honestly hope they tackle another historical moment that they retell. The parts I loved, I loved SO MUCH. So I would definitely pick up another book from them.
Maggie Brister More than 1 year ago
If you want to laugh, squeal, laugh, and squeal some more - read this book!
dibbylodd More than 1 year ago
What a wonderful combination of history and imagination! I knew I was in for a good time when I saw "Part One (in which we revise a bit of history)" and "Part Two (in which we throw history out the window)". Knowing a bit of the actual history involved, I wondered where they would go with the story. After all, it didn't end well for Edward, Jane, or Gifford. Never fear. The alternative history is in good hand with these three women. I hope they tackle more in the future.
book_junkee More than 1 year ago
I love the words these three ladies come up with on their own, so I was so excited to see what would happen when they wrote something together. I waited a bit to read and by the time I got around to it, the hype was so great, I was petrified to start it. But I looooooved it. Love love loved Jane and Edward, but G really stood out to me. All of the horse rules and horse sense and silly POVs were delightful. G was absolutely my favorite part of this book. The plot is interesting, the characters are engaging, the magic added a fun aspect, and I more than loved the added running commentary. I know I'll be reading this one again and again. **Huge thanks to Harper Teen and Edelweiss for providing the arc in exchange for an honest review**
ruthsic More than 1 year ago
This alternate universe history of the Tudor regime is a comical masterpiece by Cynthia Hand, Jodi Meadows, and Brodi Ashton. I have read their books before, and I find that this collaboration was awesome in the fact that it combines their writing prowess into a book that is filled with horse puns, random author narration and a general levity to the grim original. The story begins with King Edward dying, of ‘The Affliction’, which I assume meant tuberculosis in those days. The authors have actually changed the whole Christian-Protestant thing into a war between Shape-shifters and humans, the former being persecuted by the latter. To ensure that the shifters are not victimized by Mary’s burning rage for them, Edward hands over the crown to Jane, after marrying her off to the second son of his most trusted advisor. There is naturally some conspiracy afoot, and after Jane gets crowned, a host of suspicious events occur. Needless to say, as this is an alternate universe, liberties are taken with history – in a way that you will love it. Told from three perspectives – Jane, Edward and Gifford (Jane’s husband), as well as spontaneous input from the authors themselves, the storytelling is very vivid and lively. I could very easily picture this being a movie, and the characters are all so loveable. There is Jane, the eternal bookworm, who resents being married off to a seemingly promiscuous man, who turns into a horse (hence the horse puns) during the daytime. Gifford, for his part, adores her but is also unsure about how to tell her the truth about himself (he was not promiscuous) and how to manage his curse. Edward just wants to kiss a girl (preferably with tongue) and the crown kind of chafes his head. The three of them make an amusing trio and the addition of Gracie, the Scottish girl only made it more awesome. The mythology of the world was well-established, for a stand-alone. Overall, this is a book you should not miss!
Cupcakegirly More than 1 year ago
If you're looking for a lighthearted, funny, and imaginative take on history, in the style of The Princess Bride, My Lady Jane is the perfect anecdote! I enjoyed the characters, multiple POVs, writing--especially the humor which is so well done--and the way fact and fiction were woven together to create a story all it's own. If you're a fan of history, adventure, and romance, read it. Even if you're not, read it.