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My Life in the Maine Woods: A Game Warden's Wife in the Allagash Country
     

My Life in the Maine Woods: A Game Warden's Wife in the Allagash Country

by Annette Jackson
 

My Life in the Maine Woods recounts Annette Jackson's North Woods experiences during the 1930s when she, her husband, and their children lived in a small cabin on the shore of Umsaskis Lake. Jackson, an avid sportswoman and nature lover, writes of hunting, fishing, campfire cooking, and the sounds of the wilderness through the seasons. She visits trappers and

Overview


My Life in the Maine Woods recounts Annette Jackson's North Woods experiences during the 1930s when she, her husband, and their children lived in a small cabin on the shore of Umsaskis Lake. Jackson, an avid sportswoman and nature lover, writes of hunting, fishing, campfire cooking, and the sounds of the wilderness through the seasons. She visits trappers and woodsmen, and tells what it's like to sleep on a bed of pine boughs under the stars that shine on the legendary Allagash. This new edition expands on Jackson's original, including not only new photographs, author biography, and foreword, but also new material from Jackson and revisions she made following its original publication.

Editorial Reviews

New York Times
When Mrs. Jackson looks at a scene she seems to describe it, more or less, in the tradition of Thoreau, or Edwin Way Teale.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780976323198
Publisher:
Islandport Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
04/01/2007
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.69(d)

Read an Excerpt

"I was determined not to be just a game warden's wife. I wanted to learn to follow old trails, paddle a canoe, fish, shoot a rifle, hunt, and above all, snowshoe. I wanted to be a partner to my husband in his work. This meant that I would have to be ready on a minute's notice to accompany him. I soon learned to have my housework up to the minute and to have a few cookies always in the cookie jar. If I baked beans I would double the amount in order to put some in sealers to steam and preserve for storage. I put up other kinds of food in that way: meat, fish, vegetables, soup, and even Boston brown bread. These could be kept for days and would be ready for us when we returned home late and had to get a meal in a hurry. . . ."

" . . . As we rode it had occurred to me that while Nature is not always tricked out in holiday attire, she is nevertheless always interesting. She may be melancholy and dark today. Tomorrow she will be bright and glittering and scattering perfume. And in a strange way one's own spirit sings in harmony with the day. On drab days we are likely to be somewhat cheerless; on bright ones, full of pep and enthusiasm. Nature even in her aspects which we know so well is full of surprises. The waving of boughs in a storm is new and old to us. We are familiar with sunsets, yet no two are ever alike. The honking of geese flying overhead is a sound we know as well as we know our own voices; still, we look up happily whenever the geese signal their passing. Listening to the lulling sound of small waves washing the shore, we fall into sound sleep and awake refreshed after a delightful cool night."

What People are Saying About This

Cathie Pelletier
"This book is the door to a museum, one that opens onto a wilderness that still holds the ghostly sound of loggers filing past to their work camp, of steam log haulers, of single ax against virgin pine, of stories told at night around a red-hot woodstove in some tiny cabin on the shores of a dark and wind-blown lake."--(Cathie Pelletier, author)
Louise Dickinson Rich
"[Jackson] 'loved the country itself, and the descriptions of the many trips she took with her husband on the rounds of his duties will certainly arouse envy in the hearts of all those who love the outdoors.'"--(Louise Dickinson Rich, author of We Took to the Woods)

Meet the Author


Annette Jackson was born in 1906 and grew up in Maine's North Woods. She met Dave Jackson, a game warden at Umsaskis Lake in the Allagash Wilderness area in 1930, and they were married two years later. While raising the couple's children and hunting, fishing, and enjoying herself, Annette also started to write about her experiences. My Life in the Maine Woods was first published in 1954. She also wrote a popular newspaper column, "The Wisdom of the Timberlands" for a northern Maine newspaper. She died in 1971 at the age of sixty-five.

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