My Little Brother

My Little Brother

by David McPhail
     
 


Little brothers are BIG trouble. They mess with your stuff--and break it. They don't do chores--you do them all. And they get away with everything--while you get blamed! Here's a kid with firsthand knowledge of little brothers, and he's not quiet about it. Yet even he can't deny the special moments that make little brothers great. (And, thank goodness, he'sSee more details below

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Overview


Little brothers are BIG trouble. They mess with your stuff--and break it. They don't do chores--you do them all. And they get away with everything--while you get blamed! Here's a kid with firsthand knowledge of little brothers, and he's not quiet about it. Yet even he can't deny the special moments that make little brothers great. (And, thank goodness, he's not quiet about those, either!)

David McPhail won over girls of all ages with his well-loved picture book Sisters, recently republished as a full-color gift edition. Now he's giving boys something to cheer about in this silly and sweet tribute to brotherhood that rings true for every brother--little, big, and even all grown-up.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
"Little brothers can be a lot of trouble," begins My Little Brother by David McPhail, a companion to Sisters. A disgruntled older sibling narrates his litany of perceived unfair situations ("It's my job to feed our puppy and clean up her messes. All my little brother does is play ball with her"), depicted with softly edged watercolors over pen-and-ink drawings. The book's more optimistic ending suggests that brotherly bonds are stronger than the daily discord. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
As does McPhail's Sisters, this tale of two brothers celebrates the trials and joys of life with a sibling. It is a short, simple story narrated by the older brother with the familiar complaints brothers often have: "I have to do all the work," and "My little brother is always messing with my stuff." Of course, little brother does have a few endearing qualities; his big brother will actually miss him when he goes away to summer camp. The illustrations appeal with a retro sweetness: few kids today still have chickens in the back yard or deliver papers with a wagon. The grandparents (with ducks in the back yard) seem far too ancient for such young children and a glimpse of Mom at home reveals an ankle-length dress with buttoned cuffs. These and other details, which make it timeless for adults, may seem overly quaint to younger readers. Still, the picture of the smaller boy dressed in his brother's big shirt ("He wants to look like you.") is irresistible and, well, timeless. The illustrations, drawn by McPhail with pen and ink, have been colored by John O'Connor in soft watercolors with a touch of nostalgia. Devoid of all trappings and problems of contemporary life, the story focuses solely on the relationship between the two boys. Let's hope today's brothers are not too distracted by techno-toys and action DVDs to recognize themselves and some of the special joys of having a little brother in the family. Dads may recognize themselves as well. 2004, Harcourt, Ages 3 to 8.
—Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-A winsome, appealing story about sibling rivalry. Although the focus is on older boys and the little brothers who plague them, the scenarios are so universal and commonplace-the unfairness of a younger sibling's lack of responsibilities, his constant struggle to reach beyond his grasp, his attempts to impress an increasingly irritated older brother-that children of both genders will recognize themselves in McPhail's everyboys. Of course, by book's end, the long-suffering older brother changes his tune about his younger sibling, noting that "When we go fishing, he finds the fattest worms," and that "-he stayed up with me" all night to care for the dog when she was sick. When big brother heads off to summer camp, he admits he may even miss the little guy. McPhail's perfectly limned vignettes, in pen and ink with watercolor washes, are reminiscent of Maurice Sendak's work in his "Little Bear" period, and draw out undertones of humor, aggravation, and affection. More earnest than Kevin Henkes's Julius, the Baby of the World (Greenwillow, 1990), more delicately wrought than Russell Hoban's A Baby Sister for Frances (HarperCollins, 1964), and less raucous than Rosemary Wells's Noisy Nora (Viking, 1999), My Little Brother is sure to find an appreciative audience.-Sophie R. Brookover, Camden County Library, Voorhees, NJ Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152049003
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
05/01/2004
Edition description:
1
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.70(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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