My Louisiana Sky

( 68 )

Overview

Tiger Ann Parker wants nothing more than to get out of the rural town of Saitter, Louisiana?far away from her mentally disabled mother, her "slow" father who can't read an electric bill, and her classmates who taunt her. So when Aunt Dorie Kay asks Tiger to sp the summer with her in Baton Rouge, Tiger can't wait to go. But before she leaves, the sudden revelation of a dark family secret prompts Tiger to make a decision that will ultimately change her life.

Set in the South in ...

See more details below
Paperback (STRIPPABLE)
$7.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $4.21   
  • Used (21) from $1.99   
My Louisiana Sky

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.70
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

Tiger Ann Parker wants nothing more than to get out of the rural town of Saitter, Louisiana—far away from her mentally disabled mother, her "slow" father who can't read an electric bill, and her classmates who taunt her. So when Aunt Dorie Kay asks Tiger to sp the summer with her in Baton Rouge, Tiger can't wait to go. But before she leaves, the sudden revelation of a dark family secret prompts Tiger to make a decision that will ultimately change her life.

Set in the South in the late 1950s, this coming-of-age novel explores a twelve-year-old girl's struggle to accept her grandmother's death, her mentally deficient parents, and the changing world around her. It is a novel filled with beautiful language and unforgettable characters, and the importance of family and home.

 

My Louisiana Sky is a 1998 Boston Globe - Horn Book Award Honor Book for Fiction.

Growing up in Saitter, Louisiana, in the 1950s, twelve-year-old Tiger Ann struggles with her feelings about her stern, but loving grandmother, her mentally slow parents, and her good friend and neighbor, Jesse.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“This lyrical first novel brings fresh perspective to the guilt and anger and caring that surround the mentally disabled. All the characters . . . are drawn with warmth but no patronizing reverence.”—Booklist, Starred Review

“So honest is Holt’s portrayal of Tiger, Momma, Daddy, Granny, and the rest that one wonders if she wrote their story while sitting in a rocker on a Saitter front porch, under the vast promises of a Louisiana Sky.”—The Horn Book, Starred Review

“An unusually auspicious debut.”—Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

An ALA Notable Book for Children

An ALA Best Book for Young Adults

A Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor for Fiction

A Booklist Editors’ Choice

One of Booklist’s Top Ten First Novels of the Year

A VOYA Outstanding Title of the Year

A Parenting Magazine Best Book of the Year

A Book Links “Book for Lasting Connections”

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this poignant adaptation of Holt's debut novel, actress Ivey's natural Southern twang goes down as smooth as "Momma's extra-sweet lemondade." Twelve-year-old Tiger Ann Parker finds herself going through some momentous changes in the summer following sixth grade. Though she fiercely loves and defends her parents--both of whom are mentally disabled, or "slow," as Tiger prefers--Tiger harbors guilt about sometimes feeling embarrassed by Momma and Daddy. She's also torn between playing baseball with her best pal, Jesse Wade, and sitting on the sidelines with the girls in pretty dresses. Luckily, she has her loving, pragmatic Granny at home to help her sort through the confusion. But when Granny suddenly dies from a snake bite, Tiger's world turns upside down. In the weeks following Granny's death, Tiger discovers how truly special her parents are and that she could never leave them or their tiny rural hometown of Saitter, La. Set in the 1950s, Holt's story evokes an era on the cusp of technological and social change, when life was mostly simple, though larger problems like racial inequality loomed. Ivey portrays Tiger with the perfect mix of innocence and a sense of blossoming wisdom. Ivey's other characterizations call on a range of colorful, though never overly affected, Southern cadences and inflections. Ages 9-up. (Nov.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Making an unusually auspicious debut, Holt offers a unique coming-of-age tale. The year is 1957 and the place is Saitter, La., a small town where prejudices reach far beyond skin color. Twelve-year-old Tiger Parker, exceptionally bright and also good at baseball, is shunned by the girls in her class because her mother, Corrina, and her father, Lonnie, are "different" "Folks around here call it retarded, but I like `slow' better". Through Tiger's perceptive first-person narration, readers watch her grow painfully aware of her mother's limitations and become embarrassed by Corrina's childish behavior. She calms herself with the knowledge that her grandmother, who heads the household, has "enough brains for all of us." But Granny dies suddenly, and Tiger is left with an excruciating choice: Should she live with her sophisticated aunt in Baton Rouge, where she could find freedom but would break her parents' hearts, or should she forgo the opportunity and take on more responsibilities at home? While readers may not agree with Tiger's decision, they will admire her courage, loyalty and love for her parents. Holt conveys the innocence of Tiger's fun-loving mother and hardworking father without overdramatizing their intellectual deficiencies. The author presents and handles a sticky dilemma with remarkable grace. Ages 9-12. May
Children's Literature - Kathleen Karr
Tiger wonders why she's so different from her parents, why she can get all A's in school when her mother is sweet, but childlike, and her father is considered retarded. Luckily, she has her Granny to hold the odd household together-until Granny dies. Tiger faces discrimination from her classmates and even considers accepting her "normal" aunt's offer to move in with her in Baton Rouge. How she comes to terms with her backcountry family and the world of the nineteen-fifties is the meat of this delicately written book.
VOYA - Lynn Evarts
At twelve, Tiger Parker is not unusual in her desire to become independent from her parents, who have suddenly begun to embarrass her more than they have in the past: Tiger's parents are what she calls "slow." When she was younger, Tiger used to delight in the fact that her mother would play games with her with the same childlike enthusiasm as her friends. Now that she is almost in seventh grade, however, Tiger's mother has become more and more of an embarrassment. Tiger loves her mother, but she also keenly feels the stares of her classmates when her mother does not behave like all the other mothers. In the past, Tiger had relied upon her grandmother to listen and provide guidance through tough times, but when suddenly her grandmother is gone, Tiger is left to make adult decisions by herself. With the help of Hurricane Audrey, Tiger learns how strong she is and where she truly belongs. Young readers will empathize with Tiger's embarrassment and her desire to escape to the big city where her Aunt Doreen, so different from her own mother, lives the glamourous life of a career girl in Earl Long's Baton Rouge. Holt provides us with a lyrical story about loyalty and family in the tradition of Jean Thesman's The Rain Catchers (Houghton, 1991/VOYA October 1991), in this tender look at a young girl's coming of age set in the tumultuous times of the 1950s South that will draw readers in with its poignancy and honesty. VOYA Codes: 4Q 3P M J (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses, Will appeal with pushing, Middle School-defined as grades 6 to 8 and Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9).
KLIATT
This debut novel won much acclaim when it was published, and has appeared on many lists including the ALA Best Books for Young Adults. It tells of a twelve-year-old girl whose parents are mentally handicapped—the three of them live with Tiger Ann's grandmother, capable and nurturing, in rural Louisiana. Tiger Ann's aunt lives in Baton Rouge, and when the grandmother dies, this aunt offers Tiger Ann a chance to start a new life with her in the city. A chance to get away from the shame of having "different" parents, to find new friends who won't associate her with them, to have access to all the conveniences of life in town—these are powerful attractions. I read a book with the same basic premise last year, Han Nolan's A Face in Every Window, which is far more complex and ultimately more satisfying. In contrast, this is for the youngest of the YA readers. Its strength is in the description of that Louisiana land Tiger lives on, the community, her family, her feelings. Readers whose "normal" parents embarrass them constantly will surely relate to how Tiger feels about her "different" parents. (Editor's Note: See also audiobook review of this title in this issue.) KLIATT Codes: J*—Exceptional book, recommended for junior high school students. 1998, Random House/Dell/Yearling, 200p, $4.99. Ages 13 to 15. Reviewer: Claire Rosser; May 2000 (Vol. 34 No. 3)
School Library Journal
Gr 4-9-Set in the South in the late 1950s, this coming-of-age story explores a 12-year-old girl's struggle to accept her grandmother's death, her mentally deficient parents, and the changing world around her. By Kimberly Willis Holt. Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Midwest Book Review
Kimberly Willis Holt's My Louisiana Sky is an involving leisure read for teens. Spunky Tiger Ann is bright in school but is always teased about her parents, who are mentally slow. The entire family is cared for by a live-in grandmother: when she dies unexpectedly, it seems up to Tiger to hold her family together. Strong characterization drives this realistic story.
Horn Book Magazine
For eleven-year-old Tiger Ann Parker, Saitter, Louisiana, is not only the place where she has lived her whole life with Momma and Daddy and Granny, but also a place where some people think that her "Momma and Daddy should have never been allowed to get married because they're different"-or "retarded." Momma giggles and coos in front of the new rabbit-eared television from morning 'til night ("It's Howdy Doody time...") and Daddy can't even do simple math. Granny, the backbone of the household and an integral source of strength for Tiger, tells her, "People are afraid of what's different. That don't mean different is bad. Just means different is different." But for Tiger, "different" has become just plain embarrassing. Why can't her parents be more like Aunt Dorie Kay, Momma's younger sister, who wears high-heels and make-up and has a fancy job in Baton Rouge? When the death of her grandmother presents Tiger with the opportunity to move with Dorie Kay to Baton Rouge, even in her grief she can hardly leave Saitter fast enough. But after cutting her hair . la Audrey Hepburn and going by "Ann" for a while, Tiger begins to see the ways of her parents that, while not glamorous or book-smart, root her to home and to herself. Holt's languid storytelling style is as unhurried as a Louisiana summer, a soft steady breeze turning the pages. She exercises unusual restraint for a first-time novelist as she eases the action along with a low-key, unpretentious plot, never resorting to over-dramatization or sentimentality in developing her uncannily credible characters. So honest is Holt's portrayal of Tiger, Momma, Daddy, Granny, and the rest that one wonders if she wrote their story while sitting in a rocker on a Saitter front porch, under the vast promises of a Louisiana sky.
Kirkus Reviews
In her first YA novel, Holt gives a fresh theme sensitive and deliberate treatment: The bright child of "slow" parents comes to terms with her family's place in the community. Tiger Ann Parker is smart; she's gotten straight A's and won the spelling bee five years in a row. People in her rural 1950s Louisiana community can't figure out where she got her brains, because everyone knows that her parents, are mentally challenged. Her mother has the capabilities of a six-year-old, while her father, a good steady worker at the nursery down the road, can't manage writing or simple math. Tiger loves her parents, but as she enters middle school she becomes increasingly aware that she's socially ostracized by her classmates; her affection for her family becomes mixed with shame and anger at their differences. When Tiger's loving grandmother, who has always run the household, has a fatal heart attack, Tiger is invited to live with her glamorous Aunt Doreen in Baton Rouge. Tempted to move away and reinvent herself, Tiger ultimately comes to appreciate her parents' strengths and her own as well. Tiger, with her warring feelings, is a believable and likable narrator, and while the offerings of big-city living are too patly rejected, a well-developed setting and fully-realized characters make this an unusually strong coming-of-age story. (Fiction. 10-14)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312660956
  • Publisher: Square Fish
  • Publication date: 2/15/2011
  • Edition description: STRIPPABLE
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 149,538
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 770L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Kimberly Willis Holt is the author of the many award-winning novels for young adults and children, including The Water Seeker, Keeper of the Night, and When Zachary Beaver Came to Town, winner of a National Book Award for Young People's Literature. She is also the author of the bestselling Piper Reed series of chapter books, and picture books including Waiting for Gregory and Skinny Brown Dog. Holt was born in Pensacola, Florida, and lived all over the U.S. and the world—from Paris to Norfolk to Guam to New Orleans. She long dreamed of being a writer, but first worked as a radio news director, marketed a water park, and was an interior decorator, among other jobs. She lives in West Texas with her family.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 68 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(54)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 68 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2010

    My Louisiana Sky Is A Good Book

    My Louisiana Sky is a book about a tomboy named Tigar. She lives with her parents and her grandma. Her parents are mentally slow. So Tigar's grandma lives with them. She gets teased about her parents a lot at school. Sometimes she wishes her parents were normal. Her grandma is very strict and she doesn't mess around. Her mom is playful and doesn't do a lot around the house. Her dad works at Mr. Thompson's plant nursery and he's only home at night. They are very close to each other. Tigar does chores with her grandma and likes to play baseball.
    Tigar wants to fit in with the other girls at school. She can't because they don't have a lot of money and because of her mom and dad. Tigar hangs out with boys most of the time. One of the boys Jesse wanted to be more then friends. So he kissed her but, she didn't want to be more then friends. That ruined the friendship. In the middle of all of this Tigar's grandma dies of a heart attack, because she saw a snake in her garden. Then her aunt comes to town to help with the funeral. While she's there she asks Tigar to come live with her. Tigar goes down to her aunt's house for a week to how she would like it. She is faced with a decision that will change her life.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2012

    Love the book

    Eariler in 4th grade this year and I could imagine the book like it was a movie.They need to make a movie if not I need to see the movie so I just got it on my nook.AND WHOEVER SAID IT WAS BORING IF YOU don't like realistic fiction dont get the book.I think it's an awesome book.Read it if you don't belive me.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    I luv this book

    Omg this is so good so far

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2007

    A reviewer

    My lousiana sky is the most greatist book ever it's very sad but i like it alot it's a book that takes you some where that you'll always want too be there it the most greatist book i ever read in my life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2006

    Great Book

    I thought this book was a great read but it was kind of sad also. I recommend this book to whomever is into books that can be true and likes to read about older times. I loved to read My Louisana Sky so much I read it in about two days.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2005

    A Classic Novel To Fall In Love With

    I read this as a child in fourth grade, and now entering into 10, I am still in love with this book. It was a story i will never forget of a girl who was strong, and a family that had more love in it than anyone could imagine.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2004

    #1

    My Lousiana Sky is sad, but great!!! It's great for girls of all ages!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2004

    A Great Book

    I have read this book four times and I loved it each time. This is a great book and the author did a wonderful job. I could realy relate to Tiger in many ways.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2003

    'A Heart Warming Story for Everybody'

    The book is about a girl that has a hard life. It is recommended from any one from 9 to 99. I have been forced to read many books in my life and this one was probably the most heart warming I have ever read. I liked it because I love reading stories about people and their life. It is good for teenagers because it shows them that nobodys life is perfect and they are very fortunate to have parents like they have. Also it is a good book for any adult to read because they can just sit back and relax while reading it. So everybody out there go to your local library and check this book out today. You'll love it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2002

    Lessons in Compassion

    The role of parent and child were reversed at one point in this unusual story. I really enjoyed it and was proud of the child's role. She was brought up with love and compassion which helped her cope with her situation, under adverse circumstances.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2002

    My Louisiana sky

    Authors Name: Kimberly Willis Holt Title ¿ My Louisiana Sky Genre- Fiction Tiger¿s mother is different, she plays hide and seek with the children on Sundays and acts like she is younger then Tiger. Tiger is confused because she doesn¿t understand why the other girls laugh when her mother is around. ¿Why is my mother different?¿ She always wonders. Tiger Ann is a very independent girl. She has a mother who is physically grown up but mentally she acts like she is six years old. She has a father who is mentally retarded. I liked this book because it seemed like the author of the book actually lived in Tiger Ann¿s shoes. For example, when Tiger was in Baton Rouge the author writes it as if she was actually in Baton Rouge walking down the street with her. While I read this book I made connections to the outside world. When Tiger¿s Granny died it reminded me of the time when Princess Diana died. I made that connection because Granny¿s death occurred so fast no one could help it and almost the same thing happened when Diana died. When Granny died, Tiger didn¿t know how to deal with the death of her grandmother. I think it was the same with Princess Diana¿s death. From the beginning of this book I used two main strategies. The first one was visualizing. This strategy helped me get the big picture about the story. Visualizing also helped me understand the book better.. Another strategy I used was asking questions. To answer some questions I had to make inferences if I could not find the answer in the text. The other questions I was able to find the answer directly from the text. Those are the two strategies I used, while reading the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2001

    This is the best book I have read in a LONG time

    My Louisana Sky is a great book. Tiger Ann Parker is a pre-teen with 'slow' parents. That live in a rural area in Louisiana called Saitter. She deeply loves her parents and would do anything for them. As she enters middle school her peers look down on her and make fun of her because of her parents. While the children are making fun of her, their parents are baffeled about how Tiger managed to win the spelling bee 5 years in a row and how she has straight A's, they don't know where she gets it. She has the usual girl teenager problems with boys, even though she is living in the 1950's. She is a tomboy but thrives for the attention of the popular girls. Her grandmother is the one she goes to for help and when suddenly her grandmother, the backbone of the family the one who runs the house-hold entirely, has a heart attack, she is lost and confused. Her fancy, sophisticated Aunt Dorie Kay from Baton Rouge comes to the rescue and gives Tiger the chance to live with her in Baton Rouge. After Tiger gets to Baton Rouge she has a few changes made and gets her hair cut so that she looks like Audrey Hepburn and she goes shopping with her aunt for more sophisticated clothes. While living the life of her dreams as just Ann Parker she can't help wondering why her mother can't be like her Aunt Doreen.After she discovers some secrets she realizes how important her family really is to her. She is willing to take the bantering to live with her real parents that deeply love her and care for her. This book is entertaining and at times tear jerking.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2014

    Good book

    Amazing

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2013

    Awsomw #1

    This vook is about tiger who has parents who everyon calls retarted but she perfers slow tiger loves to playbaseball and gets strait a's wich leaves the other parents scratching there heads with the odds i have people think i should be dummer then a box
    Of nails tiger her aunt gives her an opertunity to live a better life tiger soon has to decide whats more inportant to her family or a life with no worries a moving book great for a mother and daughter to read together

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2013

    Read this

    The movie is really inaproriate.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2012

    Anonymous

    This book was amazing it was very upsetting that her grandmother died and i got real mad when it was the end of the book i wish she made this a series

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2012

    My favorite book!!

    I first read this book in 3rd grade and since then i've read it at least 20 times! I'm 22 now and i still enjoy rereading this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2012

    Good book awsome book

    Great book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2012

    Nov 1st

    Lve this book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2012

    Patata

    Patata wheres yoour scrub

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 68 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)