My Mother's Southern Kitchen

My Mother's Southern Kitchen

5.0 1
by James Villas
     
 

In 1994, My Mother's Southern Kitchen first hit the bookshelves, prompting fabulous reviews and great media attention. Now it is back to follow up Jim and Martha's most recent Southern cooking opus, My Mother's Southern Desserts. My Mother's Southern Kitchen is a priceless collection of the best dishes the South has to offer. With over 150 mouthwatering recipes, Jim…  See more details below

Overview

In 1994, My Mother's Southern Kitchen first hit the bookshelves, prompting fabulous reviews and great media attention. Now it is back to follow up Jim and Martha's most recent Southern cooking opus, My Mother's Southern Desserts. My Mother's Southern Kitchen is a priceless collection of the best dishes the South has to offer. With over 150 mouthwatering recipes, Jim and Martha Pearl show you exactly why Southerners know how to eat. From the Southern classics (buttermilk biscuits, red-eye gravy, and hoppin' John) to sinful Southern standards-macaroni and cheese, fried chicken, and barbecue-this Southern cooking compendium is a must in any kitchen, no matter where it falls along the Mason-Dixon line.

Editorial Reviews

Barbara Kafka
"You will love this book."
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
From the introduction, with its wry recounting of Martha Pearl Villas's vilifications of the Northern flour intended for baking ``biscuit,'' to the carefully collected family photos, James Villas re-creates the bustling and sometimes brawling approach to cooking that typifies his family. Martha Pearl Villas, the author's mother, fights the good fight for Southern tradition. James Villas, food editor of Town & Country and author of several cookbooks, adopts the chatty vernacular of his native South in documenting his culinary heritage. Snobs may find the tables turned, as favorite targets of food jokes (the recipes that begin, ``Take a can of cream of mushroom soup'') are staunchly defended by Mrs. Villas: ``All real Southern cooks use canned soup in certain casseroles. Why don't you taste it before ridiculing?'' So, bring on the can openers for the ``Congealed Sunshine Salad,'' made with canned pineapple. Not that Mrs. Villas has anything against fresh food; she waits at farmstands for Silver Queen corn to come in from the fields to get the very sweetest ears for her corn pudding, made with lots of of eggs, butter and half-and-half. Though many of the dishes here seem exceedingly rich, remember that a good deal are meant for feasts and holidays. Lively anecdotes of Martha Pearl Villas butting heads with Craig Claiborne over the proper way to make giblet gravy, or arguing with her son about the best binder for meatloaf, will give rise to smiles. (Oct.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
Villas is the well-known food and wine editor for Town and Country and author of many other cookbooks; his mother, a born cook, obviously had a great deal to do with his interest in food, and, despite his credentials, she is still the authority on real Southern cooking. Their readable, amusing, and informative collaboration includes more than 250 recipes, including Mrs. Villas's Perfect Fried Chicken and her Pickled Peach Salad, accompanied by her unshakeably logical opinions on cooking and ingredients. For most collections.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780026220156
Publisher:
Macmillan Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/28/1994
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
7.78(w) x 9.55(h) x 1.07(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >