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My Name Is Brian
     

My Name Is Brian

4.2 4
by Jeanne Betancourt
 

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This "outstanding" (School Library Journal) book for children is the sensitive portrayal of a boy who struggles to hide his dyslexia from his friends. Based on the author's personal experience as a dyslexic, this novel is "drawn from real insight." Kirkus Reviews.

Overview

This "outstanding" (School Library Journal) book for children is the sensitive portrayal of a boy who struggles to hide his dyslexia from his friends. Based on the author's personal experience as a dyslexic, this novel is "drawn from real insight." Kirkus Reviews.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780590449229
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/1995
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
521,791
Product dimensions:
5.26(w) x 7.56(h) x 0.42(d)
Lexile:
700L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


Jeanne Betancourt is the author of dozens of books for children, including the successful Pony Pals series. She lives on the Upper West Side of New York City. Visit her at www.jeannebetancourt.com

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My Name Is Brian 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
CaViarLaVar More than 1 year ago
Some times you feel like an "outcast" just different or not so smart. this a book for you. My first book I read outside of school
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live in a world where everyone thought you were dumb but you didn¿t know why? This is exactly what happens to Brian in the book My Name Is Brian. Brian is a student that has a very hard time in school. He doesn¿t get very much support from his family though, they all think he¿s just lazy. Even some of his friends laugh about his mistakes. Brian isn¿t laughing though he¿s tried of people thinking he¿s stupid or lazy. But Brian meets his new sixth grade teacher and the teacher focuses on Brian! The teacher doesn¿t think Brian¿s dumb he thinks that Brian might have Dyslexia. Will Brian ever be able to get past being referred to as the class dummy? Read this wonderful novel by Jeanne Betancourt to find out. This book in my opinion was very well written. This story really makes you think what it would be like to have a learning problem. This story is not just about a learning disability it¿s also about friendship and looking at the world from a different point of view. If I were to score this book from 1-5 I would give this book a 4. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading about unique and different kinds of people. This book would be appropriate probably for both boys and girls. But maybe a little better for boys because the main character is a boy and there are several jokes made about girls. I think a boy would enjoy it more than a girl would. You may recognize the author, Jeanne Betancourt from Children¿s Choices books such as Sweet Sixteen and Never¿, Not Just Party Girls, and More Than Meets the Eye. I would recommend reading this book first because I really enjoyed it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story provides teachers with an eye-opening look at children with dsylexia. Brian (the main character) unknowingly has dyslexia which is eventually uncovered by his teacher. The teacher realizes that Brian is dyslexic when he spells his name as Brain on the board. The teacher subsequently runs the appropriate tests on Brian and determines that he is, in fact, dyslexic. Once this is discovered, the healing process can begin. Brian's parents are called in for a meeting and Brian is set up with a special tutor to help him achieve in school. This is an inspirational story for teachers and parents alike because it illustrates a positive way of dealing with this common disability. Brian's abilities are highlighted throughout the novel rahter than his disability. This is the only way that we can truly reach the children if we plan to help them with their faults. No one likes to hear, repeatedly, what they are doing wrong; rather what is right and good about them. Children are no exception.