My Name Is María Isabel

( 14 )

Overview

For María Isabel Salazar López, the hardest thing about being the new girl in school is that the teacher doesn't call her by her real name. "We already have two Marías in this class," says her teacher. "Why don't we call you Mary instead?"
But María Isabel has been named for her Papá's mother and for Chabela, her beloved Puerto Rican grandmother. Can she find a way to make her teacher see that if she loses her name, she's lost the most ...

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My Name Is Maria Isabel

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Overview

For María Isabel Salazar López, the hardest thing about being the new girl in school is that the teacher doesn't call her by her real name. "We already have two Marías in this class," says her teacher. "Why don't we call you Mary instead?"
But María Isabel has been named for her Papá's mother and for Chabela, her beloved Puerto Rican grandmother. Can she find a way to make her teacher see that if she loses her name, she's lost the most important part of herself?

Third grader Marâia Isabel, born in Puerto Rico and now living in the U.S., wants badly to fit in at school; and the teacher's writing assignment "My Greatest Wish" gives her that opportunity.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Armed with her new blue bookbag, Maria Isabel bravely faces her first day at a new school. But when she meets her new teacher, she is told there are already two other Marias in the class. ``Why don't we call you Mary instead?'' her teacher suggests, unaware that Maria was named for both her grandmothers, a grandfather and her father. Maria's inability to respond to ``Mary'' leads to more problems. Simply told, this story combines the struggle of a Puerto Rican family's efforts to improve their life with a shared sense of pride in their heritage. The author's carefully drawn characterizations avoid stereotypes, thus increasing their appeal and believability. An essay involving a wish list gives Maria a chance to reclaim her name, and allows her teacher to make amends. Abetted by Thompson's straightforward black-and-white drawings, this contemporary tale serves as a good reminder that no two names are really alike. Ages 7-10. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
Gr 3-4-- This gentle story tells of Maria Isabel Salazar Lopez, who finds herself dubbed ``Mary Lopez'' when her family moves and she is placed in a class with two other Marias. Maria Isabel finds it hard to respond to a name that does not seem like hers. Her teacher doesn't understand why it is so difficult for her to answer to ``Mary'' until the child is inspired to address her paper on ``My Greatest Wish'' to the topic of her name. The result is not only a happy ending, but also an affirming study of heritage and how it is integrally bound up in an individual's sense of self. The brief text, adequately extended by line drawings, reads aloud well and could certainly be used in conjunction with Gary Soto's The Skirt (Delacorte, 1992) to illustrate the Hispanic culture that is part of the lives of many contemporary children. --Ann Welton, Terminal Park Elementary School, Auburn, WA
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689802171
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 9/1/1995
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 64
  • Sales rank: 74,375
  • Age range: 7 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Alma Flor Ada, an authority on multicultural and bilingual education, is the recipient of the 2012 Virginia Hamilton Literary Award. She is the author of numerous award-winning books for young readers, including Dancing Home with Gabriel Zubizarreta, My Name Is María Isabel, Under the Royal Palms (Pura Belpré Medal), Where the Flame Trees Bloom, and The Gold Coin (Christopher Award Medal). She lives in California, and you can visit her at AlmaFlorAda.com.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 15 of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 1, 2010

    A Good Read for People with a Strong Cultural Upbringing

    My daughter and I got this book from our local library. The story of Maria's love for her name and culture was cute. The book is short and sweet. The book is highly recommended to children and families with a strong cultural upbringing. The book is only average if you don't really care about those things.It is 90% about Maria's name and love for her heritage, very rarely getting into other characteristics of children her age.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    Ok

    I would think this isn't a bad book, looking at the reviews... But I am very disapointed at the sample! It has no story whatsoever, and I am so glad that samples are free!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 13, 2011

    A Perfect First Day of School Read Aloud

    I teach third grade and read this easy chapter book every year to my class. It has a lot of heart and explains why every child needs to have a voice. It is a particularly important book for insight into the Hispanic culture, but also deals with real issues everyone deals with like having a working mother.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2004

    GREAT

    THIS BOOK WAS GREAT! IT WAS INTERESTING AND THE LESSON LEARNED WAS INTERESTING. IT TEACHES VALUES AND CULTURE.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2014

    Maria Isabel

    This is a pretty good book. It is a little boring at some parts but overall it was a good book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2010

    what sample?

    All you get is the publishing date, credits, and contents. Most samples include at least half a chapter!,,,

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2008

    Awesome... Best Book

    This book is really, really, nice. It really has discriptive language, A nice story and lesson and it really is reality... if you know what I mean. It is really easy to imagine it happening and I know how she feels. No really, all people, three words: Read... this... book!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2006

    props for hispanic lit

    how can u not love hispanic lit?? but one thing: how is naming every girl maria not sterotypical??? not every hispanic girl is named maria, look at me for instance

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2010

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 15 of 14 Customer Reviews

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