My Real Name Is Lisa

My Real Name Is Lisa

5.0 1
by David Alexander
     
 

Peter Howard, a successful independent businessman, was used to getting things done quickly and efficiently. When he stumbled across a kidnapped girl in the middle of nowhere, he intended merely to follow her at a distance, then call the police - without getting involved. But the man who is abusing her confronts Peter with a gun. One moment later, the child is in his… See more details below

Overview

Peter Howard, a successful independent businessman, was used to getting things done quickly and efficiently. When he stumbled across a kidnapped girl in the middle of nowhere, he intended merely to follow her at a distance, then call the police - without getting involved. But the man who is abusing her confronts Peter with a gun. One moment later, the child is in his car and her abductor is lying bleeding on the ground. The lives of Lisa and Peter are irrevocably bound together as Peter realizes that if Lisa is to get home safely, he will have to take her there himself. With the scant clues Lisa offers about her background, however, Peter is unable to pinpoint where she is from and things begin to go wrong. As Lisa becomes less and less a responsibility, and more and more a child in need of protection and love, his logical plans and good intentions are complicated by his passionate determination to save her. And when her original kidnappers begin stalking them, he understands how difficult and dangerous his innocent promise to a little girl has become.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Who wouldn't root for a successful young computer-company exec who risks his life to rescue an abused, kidnapped little girl he discovers one day in a convenience store? "My real name is Lisa" is the whisper that tips off Peter Howard about the bedraggled child, apparently the daughter of a brutish man who slaps her for talking to strangers. Fearing for Lisa's welfare, Peter confronts the man and, after a vicious fight, rescues the girl. The rest of this button-pushing suspenser by Alexander (Bandit, 1994) turns on Peter's difficulties in trying to get Lisa (who knows her street address, town and phone number, but not her state) home to her parents without calling the cops-who, he fears, will arrest him for kidnapping and will return the child to her tormentors-and without falling victim to the vengeful kidnappers. As his bloody run-ins with the gang pile up, Peter's decision to go it alone seems ever more absurd. The characters remain one-dimensional, though some variety is achieved through the multitude of points of view, including Peter's first-person narration. Readers aren't so much drawn into this story as they are deftly pushed into craving a big photo finish-which arrives on schedule, and with sentiment enough to make stones weep. Film rights to CBS. (June)
Library Journal
When Peter Howard, a wealthy computer entrepreneur, encounters a woeful eight-year-old girl in a California store with an abusive adult, he impulsively follows them home, rescues her, and quickly finds himself in deep trouble. Lisa has been kidnapped and sold into sexual slavery. Howard is determined to deliver her to her parents in Oregon, but the kidnappers are hot on the trail. As in Peter Blauner's The Intruder (LJ 4/15/96), a man faces evil with little help from the social system and encounters great danger trying to go it alone. Alexander, a lawyer, artist, and author (e.g., Fane, 1981), shows Howard discovering much about himself under adversity even as he teaches Lisa to relearn trust and love. Still, it's the suspense of the chase that keeps one turning pages. For most popular collections.-Roland Person, Southern Illinois Univ. Lib., Carbondale
Kirkus Reviews
A year after six-year-old Lisa Taylor is kidnapped, computer exec Peter Howard sees a man treating a little girl in a way that looks suspicious to him. The two men exchange words and blows, and suddenly Peter finds himself on the road with Alice, who tells him, "My real name is Lisa." Anyone else would turn Lisa over to the police, but Peter doesn't want to put her through a dehumanizing system; he isn't sure he quite trusts the locals; and he expects to have her back home in a few hours—anyway, it seems a good idea to bypass the authorities and just deliver her himself to her agonized parents. But the Taylors aren't where he expects them to be—in fact, they're on a trip to Hawaii—and Jimmie Devries, the slaver who masterminded Lisa's kidnap, is on Peter's trail. By now Peter has also started to act enough like a molester himself (traveling alone with Lisa, not knowing her clothes sizes or what grade she's in) to arouse suspicion wherever he goes. And the closer he gets to the Taylors, the more his plans unravel (losing his car and money, getting scammed by people who pick him and Lisa up for a ride, and of course getting pursued by Jimmie).

Alexander (The Chocolate Spy, 1978, etc.) spins out a slick update of It Happened One Night, with felony murder substituting for romance. TV rights to CBS, which will sharply improve the TV movie by shifting more of the menace from the opening episodes to the end.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786703104
Publisher:
Avalon Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/25/1996
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
6.43(w) x 9.34(h) x 1.12(d)

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