My Tennessee Mountain Home [Bonus Track]

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
Few artists have documented their personal history as assiduously as has Dolly Parton, and never more so than on this 1973 album of all-original songs devoted to her impoverished upbringing in the mountains of east Tennessee. The songs recall a life's journey devoid of material comforts but filled with love and support, with responsible adults providing solid role models. Acutely observed and delicately expressed, the title track's homespun lyrics rank with Parton's most exquisite writing. Delicate fingerpicking and subtle drums establish an earthy ambiance in "Daddy's Working Boots," a piercing, warmhearted remembrance of the sacrifices her late father made for his wife...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
Few artists have documented their personal history as assiduously as has Dolly Parton, and never more so than on this 1973 album of all-original songs devoted to her impoverished upbringing in the mountains of east Tennessee. The songs recall a life's journey devoid of material comforts but filled with love and support, with responsible adults providing solid role models. Acutely observed and delicately expressed, the title track's homespun lyrics rank with Parton's most exquisite writing. Delicate fingerpicking and subtle drums establish an earthy ambiance in "Daddy's Working Boots," a piercing, warmhearted remembrance of the sacrifices her late father made for his wife and offspring. Following a recitation of the first, homesick letter she sent to her parents from Nashville ("The Letter"), she offers "I Remember," a gentle shuffle enumerating treasured memories of a joyful childhood, the key line being "but I remember Momma and Daddy most of all / how they used to pray that they'd live to see us grown." The brisk, jubilant workout "Dr. Robert Thomas" sings the praises of the selfless country doctor who brought her into the world. On the other hand, "The Wrong Direction Home," "The Better Part of Life," and "Down on Music Row" chronicle tough times after arriving in Nashville "sleepy, hungry, tired and dirty" and being dissed by the ruling elite; undaunted, and deeply longing for the simple childhood joys she recalls fondly in the diary-like ballad "The Better Part of Life," Parton remained steadfast until "Chet and Bob at RCA / well, they listened to my songs that day / and they both told me I was on my way." A happy ending, hard and well earned.
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All Music Guide - Ronnie D. Lankford
At some point, after a successful career and a comeback or two, certain singer/writers like Dolly Parton become artists above and beyond criticism. If her past work in pop and country hadn't accomplished this for her, her recent string of roots albums on Sugar Hill certified her status as a senior statesperson of American music. Interestingly, reaching this exalted position also has a retroactive effect, bestowing the word "classic" on one's earlier work. My Tennessee Mountain Home was originally released in 1973, and unlike 1971's Coat of Many Colors, it follows a theme and feels like a real album. After reading a letter she wrote home in 1964 after she'd first arrived in Nashville, Parton sets the tone of the album with "I Remember": My Tennessee Mountain Home will serve as a memory theater, recalling and lifting up the ideal of a modest, simple life in the country. This simplicity is evoked in small everyday details, like the "Old Black Kettle" and "Daddy's Working Boots," while the underlying values of hard work, God, and family are declared over and over. While one would never call Parton or most '70s country artists postmodernists, the music here is very self-conscious of its rural roots and how the principles it sets forth are both different and at odds with the outside world. Parton has written all the material, and producer Bob Ferguson has done a much better job integrating songs and arrangements than on the previous Coat of Many Colors. And while there are a number of impure additions -- cheesy background singing being the most annoying -- acoustic guitars and Dobros play a prominent role. The 2007 reissue of My Tennessee Mountain Home is skimpy on bonus material. The sole extra, "Sacred Memories," was originally issued on Love Is Like a Butterfly, and even with this one addition, the album is not quite 35 minutes long. Still, the album qualifies as classic Dolly Parton, and it's nice to have it on CD.

At some point, after a successful career and a comeback or two, certain singer/writers like Dolly Parton become artists above and beyond criticism. If her past work in pop and country hadn't accomplished this for her, her recent string of roots albums on Sugar Hill certified her status as a senior statesperson of American music. Interestingly, reaching this exalted position also has a retroactive effect, bestowing the word "classic" on one's earlier work. My Tennessee Mountain Home was originally released in 1973, and unlike 1971's Coat of Many Colors, it follows a theme and feels like a real album. After reading a letter she wrote home in 1964 after she'd first arrived in Nashville, Parton sets the tone of the album with "I Remember": My Tennessee Mountain Home will serve as a memory theater, recalling and lifting up the ideal of a modest, simple life in the country. This simplicity is evoked in small everyday details, like the "Old Black Kettle" and "Daddy's Working Boots," while the underlying values of hard work, God, and family are declared over and over. While one would never call Parton or most '70s country artists postmodernists, the music here is very self-conscious of its rural roots and how the principles it sets forth are both different and at odds with the outside world. Parton has written all the material, and producer Bob Ferguson has done a much better job integrating songs and arrangements than on the previous Coat of Many Colors. And while there are a number of impure additions -- cheesy background singing being the most annoying -- acoustic guitars and Dobros play a prominent role. The 2007 reissue of My Tennessee Mountain Home is skimpy on bonus material. The sole extra, "Sacred Memories," was originally issued on Love Is Like a Butterfly, and even with this one addition, the album is not quite 35 minutes long. Still, the album qualifies as classic Dolly Parton, and it's nice to have it on CD.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 4/3/2007
  • Label: Sony
  • UPC: 828768152928
  • Catalog Number: 81529

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Dolly Parton Primary Artist, Guitar, Vocals
Johnny Gimble Fiddle
Pete Drake Dobro, Steel Guitar
Buck Trent Banjo, Electric Banjo
Joe Babcock Vocals, Background Vocals
Jimmy Capps Guitar
Jerry Carrigan Drums
Chip Young Guitar
Jim Colvard Guitar
Bobby Dyson Bass
Dolores Edgin Vocals, Background Vocals
Dave Kirby Guitar, Rhythm Guitar
Carol Montgomery Vocals
Ron Oates Piano
June Page Vocals, Background Vocals
Hargus "Pig" Robbins Piano
Jerry Stembridge Guitar, Rhythm Guitar
Bobby Thompson Guitar, Rhythm Guitar
Don Warden Dobro
Jimmy Colvard Guitar
Charlie McCoy Harmonica
Mack Magaha Fiddle
James "Jimmy" Riddle Harmonica
Mary Hoephinger Harp
Technical Credits
Dolly Parton Composer, Author
Bob Ferguson Producer
Tom Pick Engineer
Chet Flippo Liner Notes
Howard Fritzson Art Direction
Vic Anesini Mastering
Rob Santos Reissue Producer
Louis Owens Cover Photo
Avie Lee Parton Original Liner Notes
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