My World

My World

5.0 1
by Cyndi Thomson
     
 

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On her hit single "What I Mean to Say," sweet-voiced Cyndi Thomson delivers up a taut, folk-rock-flavored lament for a love that got away. There's a yearning in Thomson's delivery that underscores her regret over words left unspoken. Thomson's debut album, however, is clearly not about to squander a golden opportunity. On the 11 songs here -- she wrote eight with her… See more details below

Overview

On her hit single "What I Mean to Say," sweet-voiced Cyndi Thomson delivers up a taut, folk-rock-flavored lament for a love that got away. There's a yearning in Thomson's delivery that underscores her regret over words left unspoken. Thomson's debut album, however, is clearly not about to squander a golden opportunity. On the 11 songs here -- she wrote eight with her mentor, Tommy Lee James -- state-of-the-art mainstream arrangements abound: There's insistent drumming, searing guitars, discrete dollops of strings, and judicious quotes from various percussion and stringed instruments. But in front of all that is Thomson's engaging and credible mix of sass and vulnerability. "If You Could Only See" finds her boosting her man's low self-esteem in quintessential country-pop terms, with soaring choruses sandwiched between rapturous, sensitive verses. The album-closing "I'll Be Seeing You" and "Hope You're Doing Fine" are suffused with melancholy over departed lovers, even as each song's slow-boiling country-pop arrangement and terse vocal performance suggest strength surfacing in the wake of heartbreak. My World arrives radio-ready, but not without a bit of meat on the bone.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Thom Jurek
At 24, Cyndi Thomson's deepest country music influence is current diva Trisha Yearwood, who herself was only a third-generation pop-country singer who transcended the genre's limitations with a rich voice and killer songs. But Thomson's youth shouldn't be held against her. For in the field of curtain-shirted rock & roll wannabes and Brooks & Dunn clones and Shania Twain-esque glamor queens who couldn't sing a lick if there weren't pitch levelers in recording studios, Thomson is a rarity. As a singer she posses a genuine slippery, smoky alto that reaches deep inside the heart for the lyric rather than in the trembling upper registers of her instrument. She has the songs too, given that her producer and co-writer is none other than Tommy James. Lastly, she's a country singer first and a pop singer second. My World will, hopefully, lay claim to a slot on the country chart near the top, which would mean there was hope for Nash Vegas (not a lot, but a smidge anyway -- which is more than there is now). Sure, there are the requisite fiddles on her record, but there are also banjos and flat-picked guitars, as well as recorders, Hammond B-3s (as on the single "What I Really Meant to Say"). The single is clearly meant to put the album in the hands and minds (not like they really have them, but we'll give them the benefit of the doubt on this set) of country music radio station programmers. Once said single charts, the label digs into the disc for further material, hopefully to the title track or "Hope You're Doing Fine," with its ringing mandolin and pedal steel whine. Ultimately, My World has some concessions to the pop market: it's slickly produced; there are some taut, pop sheeny arrangements and a few drum machines here and there. But compared to the absolute crap being cranked out of Nash Vegas, this is a bona fide country record in the same tradition as Thomson's mentor Yearwood. And there are a lot lower sights (especially now) to set your eyes on.
Entertainment Weekly - Alanna Nash
Nashville pop never sounded so cool.

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Product Details

Release Date:
07/31/2001
Label:
Emi Mod Afw
UPC:
0724352601004
catalogNumber:
26010
Rank:
93561

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Cyndi Thomson   Primary Artist,Background Vocals
Dan Dugmore   Acoustic Guitar,Dobro,Mandolin,Electric Guitar,Steel Guitar,Guitar (12 String Electric)
Stuart Duncan   Fiddle
David Lyndon Huff   Percussion
John Mock   Penny Whistle
Greg Morrow   Guitar (12 String Electric)
Nashville String Machine   Performing Ensemble
Steve Nathan   Piano,Keyboards,Wurlitzer
Randy Scruggs   Acoustic Guitar,Banjo,Mandolin
Paul Worley   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar,12-string Guitar
Jonathan Yudkin   Fiddle,Cello,Viola
Tommy Lee James   Background Vocals
Tim Lauer   Accordion

Technical Credits

Carlos Grier   Digital Editing
David Lyndon Huff   drum programming
Rob Mathes   String Arrangements
Mike Poole   Engineer
Denny Purcell   Mastering
Paul Worley   Producer
Tommy Lee James   Producer
Clarke Schleicher   Engineer
Eric Conn   Digital Editing

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