The Myriad (Tour of the Merrimack Series #1)

The Myriad (Tour of the Merrimack Series #1)

4.1 27
by R. M. Meluch
     
 

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The U.S.S. Merrimack was the finest battleship class spaceship in Earth's fleet, able to stand up against the best the Palatine Empire could throw at them, even able to attack and kill swarms of the seemingly unstoppable Hive. But nothing could have prepared the captain and crew of the Merrimack to face the Myriad-three colonized worlds in the midst of a globular

Overview

The U.S.S. Merrimack was the finest battleship class spaceship in Earth's fleet, able to stand up against the best the Palatine Empire could throw at them, even able to attack and kill swarms of the seemingly unstoppable Hive. But nothing could have prepared the captain and crew of the Merrimack to face the Myriad-three colonized worlds in the midst of a globular cluster that the
Hive had somehow overlooked.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for the Tour of the Merrimack series:
 
“While Meluch depicts combat and warrior culture as well as any writer in the subgenre, the true joy of this outstanding effort…lies in its inspired use of current speculation on the origins of the universe, quantum singularities and even the old chestnut of time travel…. Meluch shows particular skill in creating memorable characters while exhibiting a refreshing ruthlessness in subordinating them to the logical ramifications of the plot.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review), for The Myriad

“Rousing far-future SF novel.... This is grand old-fashioned space opera, so toss your disbelief out the nearest air lock and dive in.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review), for Wolf Star
 
“Meluch is an excellent writer, and has a firm grasp of military tactics, character development and storytelling. A good substitute for those waiting for David Weber’s next Honor Harrington novel.” —Sacramento Book Review 
 
“Enough action and suspense for three novels. Meluch’s wry, realistic wit finds the ludicrous in the military, sex in the military, and a dozen other matters. A treat for military sf buffs.” —Booklist, for The Sagittarius Command
 
Fast action, hairbreadth escapes, and Meluch’s facility for humor in an astonishing range of situations incum­bent on military life become the order of the day.... A fine yarn to chuckle along with, just like the previous Tour of the Merrimack adventures.” —Booklist, for Strength and Honor
 
The Ninth Circle is an immensely readable book that flows very quickly and draws you in withsharp little hooks that demand you finish the book before you dream of beginning any other.” —Seattle Post-Intelligencer 
 
“A lovely sequel with excellent writing and wonderful characters…. This is a great read for people who liked Horatio Hornblower and Jack Aubrey and Daniel Leary.” —SFRevu 
 
“A heart-pounding thrill ride…. Fans of Star Trek and Heinlein alike will enjoy the story…a great story of space warfare and the triumph of the human spirit against insurmountable odds.” —Grasping for the Wind 

bn.com
The Barnes & Noble Review
R. M. Meluch's first novel in more than a decade, The Myriad, begins a series that is an amalgam of subgenres: military science fiction, space opera, time paradox, and alternate history.

On an Earth where the Roman Empire never fell (but instead existed in secret societies for millennia, finally reestablishing itself on the planet Palatine) and is now embroiled in a war against the League of Earth Nations, a much more deadly foe emerges from the darkness of deep space -- the Hive. The governments of Palatine and Earth enter into an uneasy alliance to fight the alien invaders, nondescript antqagonists that exist only to consume. While the unified forces try to keep the Hive from destroying human-populated planets, one U.S. battleship, the Merrimack, sets off on a quest to find the Hive's homeworld and take the battle to its source.

During the ship's desperate search, the crew of the Merrimack discovers a strange star cluster with three worlds inhabited by sentient beings. After first contact with the amazingly humanoid populace, Captain John Farragut discovers a series of wormholes that could unlock the secrets that could defeat the Hive -- or destroy humankind forever.

Vaguely reminiscent of Robert A. Heinlein's Starship Troopers (specifically, the relentless alien antagonists and the over-the-top, gung-ho characters), Meluch's The Myriad is lighthearted, fast-paced fun. While obviously not as intense or controversial as Heinlein's Hugo Award–winning classic, this novel will prove thorougly enjoyable to fans of military science fiction authors like David Weber and David Drake. Paul Goat Allen

Publishers Weekly
Most military SF emphasizes the military, but while Meluch depicts combat and warrior culture as well as any writer in the subgenre, the true joy of this outstanding effort, her first novel since 1992's The Queen's Squadron and the first of a new series, lies in its inspired use of current speculation on the origins of the universe, quantum singularities and even the old chestnut of time travel. In the 25th century, an encounter with a voracious space-faring life-form called the Hive forces declared enemies, the United States and a breakaway colony that styles itself as a reborn Roman Empire, into an uneasy alliance to destroy the common threat. When the U.S. space battleship Merrimack makes first contact with a humanoid race whose star system has apparently been bypassed by the Hive, the U.S. crew is left to ponder how a species that hasn't developed FTL technology can exist in not one but at least three different star systems. Meanwhile, how can an artifact sent by the current ruler of one system exist as an archeological anomaly on another, an artifact 20 billion years old, in a universe only 15 billion years old? Meluch shows particular skill in creating memorable characters while exhibiting a refreshing ruthlessness in subordinating them to the logical ramifications of the plot. Agent, Jennifer Jackson at DMLA. (Jan. 4) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756403201
Publisher:
DAW
Publication date:
01/03/2006
Series:
Tour of the Merrimack Series, #1
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
743,819
Product dimensions:
6.78(w) x 10.90(h) x 1.03(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

R. M. Meluch is an American SF writer, and published the first of her Tour of the Merrimack series of military SF/space opera novels in 2005. She can be found at rmmeluch.com.

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Myriad (Tour of the Merrimack Series #1) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Thaddeus72 More than 1 year ago
I am an Officer in the the US Army and have worked with both the US Navy a well as the US Marine Corps which the story's character all originate. Even though this is a work of Science Fiction it truly captures the feel of being a US Service member away from home but placed in the far future. R.M. Meluch makes you love the characters, the ship and their passion the serve their country as well as their home world of Earth. It shows that even though the Characters are Marines and Sailors they are people as well with families and what it means to place the needs of the many over the needs of the few. I highly recommend this book for both Sci-Fi as well as Military readers. Continuing... Her grasp on theoretical physics is outstanding, Star Trek fans would Love this as well... Time travel, paradox's and black holes oh my... A must read as well as the rest of the series...
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I picked up the book, I was expecting a B-grade pulp fantasy, but this book is really a lot better than that. The science and characters hold together a lot better than the cover art would indicate. The basic premise is simple - you have a interstellar warship - crewed mostly by people in their early 20s (including a contingent of 'we don't need no education' marines) - fighting space aliens. Some of the relationships are juvenile, but they are accurately depicted (imagine being on a ship full of ... well... 20 year olds). A lot of teenage and early 20's angst - a warship isn't the best place for a relationship - most of the younger character's lack emotional maturity, and most of the older ones face relationship problems caused by their chosen profession. As for the science, it is pretty solid. There are a couple of 'science assumptions' that are a bit far-fetched, but the science is internally consistent with those assumptions. I loved the end. There is a lot of foreshadowing for it, but it is still a bit of a surprise. The end resolves absolutely nothing... but that is the real point of the book (and you'll have to read the book to determine why I write that).
VaMage More than 1 year ago
Ms. Meluch has assembled a cast of great characters, some based on historical figures while others are uniquely her own. As science fiction goes this is a pretty good story, the Tech in it is first rate, the rational is excellent, and the action it tight, but it it his her characters that bring you back for book 2. I won't comment in depth on those characters, meeting and getting to know them is part of the fun, but I would like to compliment the author on the types of characters she has. Over the last twenty years or so I have noticed that an increasing number of women authors simply cannot create a white, heterosexual, competent, decent human being. In book after book the men have to be alien, undead, Were-creature, gay, or at least a person of color, to be in an heroic role. Not so for Ms. Meluch, whose characters seem to transcend, while not losing, their race, nationality, gender, or orientation in their shared identity as crew or protagonists of the Merrimack. Thank you Ms. Meluch, I hope some of your contemporaries can follow your example.
harstan More than 1 year ago
The Roman Empire never really died; it just went underground waiting and gathering its forces so that when it emerges it will be a power to be reckoned with. That time came when FTL space flight because a reality and the Roman Empire reemerged on the distant planet of Palatine. Earth and Palatine engaged in an on and off again war for almost two centuries until a common enemy united them in an uneasy truce. The Hive is sweeping across the galaxy, eating everything that crosses its path and actually seeking inhabited planets for its meals. The US. Merrimack is charged with finding the Hive home world and destroying it. While on its mission the crew finds THE MYRIAD, three inhabited worlds in a globular cluster; colony worlds settled by a non-Terran humanoid race. The inhabitants of these worlds travel through space using wormholes where time and space are twisted.--- After making first contact, the Merrimack leaves and is attacked by a swarm of the hive. After two very intense battles, the Merrimack is called back to the Myriad because their use of the wormholes is causing the cluster to collapse; a planetary leader¿s plan will mean the destruction of the three inhabited worlds.--- THE MYRIAD, the first book in the tour of the Merrimack, is terrific military science fiction. The crew of the Merrimack are believable and likable especially Captain Farragut, who care about the men and women under his command. R.M. Meluch provides intense battle scenes and vivid descriptions of their aftermath in such a way that readers feel for the man and women risking their lives against an almost unstoppable enemy while also eagerly awaiting the next book in this series.--- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting space yarn
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was really looking forward to this series but I was given the last book as a gift without reading the first novels.  I recently picked up tour of the mirrimack  volume 1.  This included the Myriad and Wolfstar back to back.  I thought it was a good read but the series as it was printed in this 2 part volume made absolutely no sense.  I read the myriad and then the 2nd part, wolf star.  In the Myriad all the characters already knew all about the Hive and there were collaboration between the US forces and Roman forces.   A key character, Cowboy Carver also died due to his own negligence.  In the 2nd part, Wolf Star, all the characters were just learning about the Hive and US and Roman forces were still at war.  Cowboy Carver who died in the Myriad also died in Wolf Star.  I have to say this is extremely poor editing and it made an otherwise good read into a confusing mess.  I would have given it 5 stars but due to the monumental editing blunders I have to downgrade it.  I will be reading the rest of the series and I expect to see dead characters back to life as if nothing had happened to them.  I'm interested in reading the rest but still disappointed as I have not been in quite a while.
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