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The most engaging and musical Sight-Singing text on the market.

Music for Sight Singing is structured around organized melodiesdrawn from the literature of composed music and a wide range of the world’s folk music. Real music exercises allow readers to practice sight singing and develop their “mind’s ear” – the ability to imagine how music sounds without first playing it on an instrument.

The ninth edition continues to introduce a host of important musical considerations beyond pitch and rhythm- including dynamics, accents, articulations, slurs, repeat signs, and tempo markings. The book’s arrangement of simple to complex exercises lays the foundations for success.

Learning Goals

Upon completing this book, readers will be able to:

  • Fluently read rhythms in simple and compound meters, including those in relatively unusual, irregular, or changing meter signatures.
  • Sight sing melodies in any major or minor key, and in any diatonic mode.
  • Effortlessly read all four common clefs.
  • Understand common musical symbols and terms.
  • Recognize and sing important harmonic features such as dominant seventh and Neapolitan chords.
  • Improvise effectively from a variety of background structures such as a harmonic progression or an underlying contrapuntal framework.
  • Negotiate chromatic passages from simple embellishing tones and tonicizations to modulations to post-tonal music.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“The carefully graded nature of the examples makes it appropriate for all four semesters of our course sequence and. [The text] meets our need well and has stood the test of time.”

- Robert Mills, Liberty University

The most significant challenge facing the students is developing the skills and abilities quickly enough to maintain pace with the curriculum. I believe it is more of a time issue (lack of practice time, or student choice to avoid practice) than a curriculum pacing issue. This text responds very nicely to this challenge; we have the freedom to set the pace as needed to sufficiently challenge, but not overwhelm, the student population.”

- William Harbinson, Appalachian State University

“The most important feature of any aural skills and sight-singing book is that it includes real musical examples. For this alone, Music for Sight Singing is indispensable.”

- Jill T. Brasky, University of South Florida

“The sequence is logical. Progression from quarter to other note values is excellent. It is a great introduction to rhythms, one step at a time.”

- James Hutching, Carl Sandburg College

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205939749
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 1/25/2013
  • Edition description: Student
  • Edition number: 9
  • Pages: 448
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.02 (h) x 0.02 (d)

Meet the Author

Nancy Rogers is an Associate Professor of Music Theory at Florida State University. With research interests including music cognition and its pedagogical implications, Dr. Rogers has presented papers at national and international conferences, including meetings of the Society for Music Theory, the Society for Music Perception and Cognition, the International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, and the Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology. She was a keynote speaker at the 2009 Musical Ear conference held at Indiana University. Several recent publications may be found in Music Theory Online, the Journal of Music Theory Pedagogy, and Em Pauta.

Professor Rogers received her Ph.D. in music theory from the Eastman School of Music; she is a Mellon Fellow in the Humanities. She has served as President of Music Theory Southeast, Secretary of the Society for Music Theory, and Treasurer of Music Theory Midwest. Before coming to Florida State University, she served on the faculties of Northwestern University, the University of Iowa, and Lawrence University.

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Table of Contents

In this Section:
1) Brief Table of Contents

2) Full Table of Contents


BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Part I

Chapter 1 - RHYTHM: Simple Meters; The Beat and Its Division into Two Parts

Chapter 2 - MELODY: Stepwise Melodies, Major Keys

RHYTHM: Simple Meters; The Beat and Its Division into Two Parts

Chapter 3 - MELODY: Leaps within the Tonic Triad, Major Keys

RHYTHM: Simple Meters

Chapter 4 - MELODY: Leaps within the Tonic Triad, Major Keys

RHYTHM: Compound Meters; The Beat and Its Division into Three Parts

Chapter 5 - MELODY: Minor Keys; Leaps within the Tonic Triad

RHYTHM: Simple and Compound Meters

Chapter 6 - MELODY: Leaps within the Dominant Triad (V); Major and Minor Keys

RHYTHM: Simple and Compound Meters

Chapter 7 - THE C CLEFS: Alto and Tenor Clefs

Chapter 8 - MELODY: Further Use of Diatonic Leaps

RHYTHM: Simple and Compound Meters

Chapter 9 - MELODY: Leaps within the Dominant Seventh Chord (V7); Other Diatonic Seventh Leaps

RHYTHM: Simple and Compound Meters

Part II

Chapter 10 - RHYTHM: The Subdivision of the Beat: The Simple Beat into Four Parts,The Compound Beat into Six Parts

Chapter 11 - MELODY: Leaps within the Tonic and Dominant Triads

RHYTHM: Subdivision in Simple and Compound Meters

Chapter 12 - MELODY: Further Use of Diatonic Leaps

RHYTHM: Subdivision in Simple and Compound Meters

Part III

Chapter 13 - RHYTHM and MELODY: Syncopation

Chapter 14 – RHYTHM and MELODY: Triplet Division of Undotted Note Values; Duplet Division of Dotted Note Values

Chapter 15 – MELODY: Chromaticism (I): Chromatic Embellishing Tones;

Tonicizing the Dominant; Modulation to the Key of the Dominant or the Relative Major

Chapter 16 – MELODY: Chromaticism (II): Tonicization of Any Diatonic Triad; Modulation to Any Closely Related Key

Chapter 17 – RHYTHM and MELODY: Changing Meter Signatures; The Hemiola; Less Common Meter Signatures

Chapter 18 – RHYTHM and MELODY: Further Subdivision of the Beat; Notation in Slow Tempi

Chapter 19 – MELODY: Chromaticism (II): Additional Uses of Chromatic Tones; Remote Modulation

Part IV

Chapter 20 – MELODY: The Diatonic Modes

Chapter 21 – RHYTHM AND MELODY: The Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

FULL TABLE OF CONTENTS:

(R) indicates Rhythmic Reading exercises

Part I

MELODY: DIATONIC INTERVALS

RHYTHM: DIVISION OF THE BEAT

Chapter 1 – RHYTHM: Simple Meters; The Beat and Its Division into Two

Parts

RHYTHMIC READING

Section 1 (R). The quarter note as the beat unit. Beat-note values and larger only.

Section 2 (R). The quarter note as the beat unit and its division. Dotted notes and tied notes.

Section 3 (R). Two-part drills.

Section 4 (R). Note values other than the quarter note as beat values.

Section 5 (R). Two-part drills.

Chapter 2 – MELODY: Stepwise Melodies, Major Keys

RHYTHM: Simple Meters; The Beat and Its Division into Two Parts

SIGHT SINGING

Section 1. Major keys, treble clef, the quarter note as the beat unit. Key signatures with no more than three sharps or three flats.

Section 2. Bass clef.

Section 3. Other meter signatures.

Section 4. Duets.

Section 5. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 3 – MELODY: Leaps within the Tonic Triad, Major Keys

RHYTHM: Simple Meters

Section 1. Major keys, treble clef, leaps of a third, fourth, fifth, and octave within the tonic triad. The quarter note as the beat unit.

Section 2. Bass clef.

Section 3. Leaps of a sixth within the tonic triad.

Section 4. The half note and the eighth note as beat units.

Section 5. Duets.

Section 6. Key signatures with five, six, and seven sharps or flats.

Section 7. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 4 – MELODY: Leaps within the Tonic Triad, Major Keys

RHYTHM: Compound Meters; The Beat and Its Division into Three Parts

Section 1 (R). Rhythmic reading: The dotted quarter note as the beat unit. Single lines and two-part drills.

Section 2. Sight singing: Major keys, treble clef; the dotted quarter note as the beat Unit.

Section 3. Sight singing: Bass clef.

Section 4 (R). Rhythmic reading: The dotted half note and the dotted eighth note as beat units, including two-part drills.

Section 5. Sight singing: The dotted half note and dotted eighth note as beat units.

Section 6. Duets.

Section 7. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 5 – MELODY: Minor Keys; Leaps within the Tonic Triad

RHYTHM: Simple and Compound Meters

Section 1. Simple meters.

Section 2. Compound meters.

Section 3. Duets.

Section 4. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 6 – MELODY: Leaps within the Dominant Triad (V); Major and Minor Keys

RHYTHM: Simple and Compound Meters

Section 1. Leaps of a third within the V triad; major keys; simple meters.

Section 2. Leaps of a third within the V triad; minor keys; simple meters.

Section 3. Leaps of a fourth and fifth within the V triad; major and minor keys; simple meters.

Section 4. Leaps of a sixth within the V triad; simple meters.

Section 5. Compound meters; various leaps within the V triad.

Section 6. Numerator of 3, compound meters.

Section 7. Duets.

Section 8. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 7 –THE C CLEFS: Alto and Tenor Clefs

Section 1. The alto clef.

Section 2. The tenor clef.

Section 3. Duets.

Section 4. Additional practice in the C clefs.

Section 5. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 8 – MELODY: Further Use of Diatonic Leaps

RHYTHM: Simple and Compound Meters

Section 1. Single-line melodies.

Section 2. Bass lines.

Section 3. Duets.

Section 4. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 9 – MELODY: Leaps within the Dominant Seventh Chord (V7); O ther Diatonic Seventh Leaps

RHYTHM: Simple and Compound Meters

Section 1. The complete dominant seventh chord.

Section 2. The leap of a minor seventh within the V7 chord.

Section 3. The leap of a tritone within the V7 chord.

Section 4. Other diatonic seventh leaps.

Section 5. Structured improvisation.

Part II

MELODY: DIATONIC INTERVALS

RHYTHM: SUBDIVISION OF THE BEAT

Chapter 10 – RHYTHM: The Subdivision of the Beat: The Simple Beat into Four Parts, The Compound Beat into Six Parts

RHYTHMIC READING, SIMPLE METERS 

Section 1 (R). Preliminary exercises, simple meters.

Section 2 (R). Rhythmic reading exercises in simple meters.

Section 3 (R). Two-part drills, simple meters.

RHYTHMIC READING, COMPOUND METERS 

Section 4. Preliminary exercises, compound meters.

Section 5. Rhythmic reading exercises in compound meters.

Section 6. Two-part drills, compound meters.

Chapter 11 – MELODY: Leaps within the Tonic and Dominant Triads

RHYTHM: Subdivision in Simple and Compound Meters

Section 1. Single-line melodies and duets.

Section 2. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 12 – MELODY: Further Use of Diatonic Leaps

RHYTHM: Subdivision in Simple and Compound Meters

Section 1. Diatonic leaps except the seventh and tritone.

Section 2. Leaps of a seventh or tritone within the V7 chord.

Section 3. Other melodic dissonances.

Section 4. Structured improvisation.

Part III

MELODY: CHROMATICISM

RHYTHM: FURTHER RHYTHMIC PRACTICES

Chapter 13- RHYTHM AND MELODY: Syncopation

MELODY: RHYTHMIC READING

Section 1 (R). Syncopation in simple meters at the beat or beat division level.

Section 2 (R) Syncopation in compound meters at the beat or beat division level.

Section 3 (R). Two-part drills.

Section 4 (R). Syncopation at the beat subdivision level in simple meters.

Section 5 (R). Syncopation at the beat subdivision level in compound meters.

Section 6 (R). Two-part drills.

SIGHT SINGING

Section 7. Syncopation in simple meters at the beat or beat division level.

Section 8. Syncopation in compound meters at the beat or beat division level.

Section 9. Syncopation at the beat subdivision level in simple and compound meters.

Section 10. Duets.

Section 11. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 14 – RHYTHM and MELODY: Triplet Division of Undotted Note Values; Duplet Division of Dotted Note Values

RHYTHMIC READING

Section 1 (R). Triplet division of undotted note values.

Section 2 (R). Duplet division of dotted note values.

Section 3 (R). Two-part drills.

SIGHT SINGING

Section 4. Triplet division of undotted note values.

Section 5. Duplet division of dotted note values.

Section 6. Duets.

Section 7. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 15 – MELODY: Chromaticism (I): Chromatic Embellishing Tones; Tonicizing the Dominant; Modulation to the Key of the Dominant or the Relative Major

Section 1. Chromatic notes in the context of stepwise motion.

Section 2. Chromatic notes approached or left by leap.

Section 3. Tonicization of V in major keys.

Section 4. Tonicization of III and modulation to the relative major from minor keys.

Section 5. Modulation to the dominant from major and minor keys.

Section 6. Duets.

Section 7. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 16 – MELODY: Chromaticism (II): Tonicization of Any Diatonic Triad; Modulation to Any Closely Related Key

Section 1. Tonicization of any diatonic triad; modulation only to the dominant or relative major key.

Section 2. Modulation to any closely related key.

Section 3. Duets.

Section 4. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 17 – RHYTHM and MELODY: C hanging Meter Signatures; The Hemiola; Less Common Meter Signatures

RHYTHMIC READING

Section 1 (R). Definitions and rhythmic reading exercises.

SIGHT SINGING

Section 2. Changing meter signatures.

Section 3. The hemiola.

Section 4. Meters of 5 and 7, and other meters.

Section 5. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 18 – RHYTHM and MELODY: Further Subdivision of the Beat; Notation in Slow Tempi

Section 1 (R). Rhythmic reading.

Section 2. Sight singing.

Section 3. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 19 – MELODY: Chromaticism (III): Additional Uses of Chromatic T ones; Remote Modulation

Section 1. Chromatic tones in less common intervals.

Section 2. The Neapolitan sixth.

Section 3. Remote modulation.

Section 4. Structured improvisation.

Part IV

THE DIATONIC MODES AND RECENT MUSIC

Chapter 20 – MELODY: The Diatonic Modes

Section 1. Folk music.

Section 2. Composed music.

Section 3. Structured improvisation.

Chapter 21 – RHYTHM and MELODY: The Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

Section 1 (R). Meter and rhythm. Rhythmic reading.

Section 2. Extensions of the traditional tonal system.

Section 3. Symmetrical collections; the whole-tone and octatonic scales.

Section 4. Freely post-tonal melodies; twelve-tone melodies.

Section 5. Duets.

Section 6. Structured improvisation.

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