The Mysteries of Pittsburgh

The Mysteries of Pittsburgh

3.7 35
by Michael Chabon, Milan Bozic
     
 

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The acclaimed New York Times bestseller.

Author Biography: Michael Chabon was born in Washington, D.C. His first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburg, was a national bestseller and was compared by critics to the besr of Fitzgerald and Salnger. Upon publication of his second novel, Wonder Boys, he was hailed by The Washington Post Book World<

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Overview

The acclaimed New York Times bestseller.

Author Biography: Michael Chabon was born in Washington, D.C. His first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburg, was a national bestseller and was compared by critics to the besr of Fitzgerald and Salnger. Upon publication of his second novel, Wonder Boys, he was hailed by The Washington Post Book World as "the young star of American letters." His short stories have appeared in The New Yorker and in Gentlemen's Quarterly. He lives in San Francisco with his wife and two children.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
First-novelist Chabon, with ``distinctive vision'' and ``an elegiac, graceful style,'' spins a story about alienated youth that, while serving up some familiar details of sex, alcohol and drugs, ``fully engages the reader in the lives of an appealing cast of characters,'' said PW . (Apr.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061687570
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/30/2008
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
4.50(w) x 7.10(h) x 1.10(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Mysteries of Pittsburgh
A Novel

Chapter One

Elevator Going Up

At the beginning of the summer I had lunch with my father, the gangster, who was in town for the weekend to transact some of his vague business. We'd just come to the end of a period of silence and ill will—a year I'd spent in love with and in the same apartment as an odd, fragile girl whom he had loathed, on sight, with a frankness and a fury that were not at all like him. But Claire had moved out the month before. Neither my father nor I knew what to do with our new freedom.

"I saw Lenny Stem this morning," he said. "He asked after you. You remember your Uncle Lenny."

"Sure," I said, and I thought for a second about Uncle Lenny, juggling three sandwich halves in the back room of his five-and-dime in the Hill District a million years ago.

I was nervous and drank more than I ate; my father carefully dispatched his steak. Then he asked me what my plans were for the summer, and in the flush of some strong emotion or other I said, more or less: It's the beginning of the summer and I'm standing in the lobby of a thousand, story grand hotel, where a bank of elevators a mile long and an endless red row of monkey attendants in gold braid wait to carry me up, up, up through the suites of moguls, of spies, and of starlets, to rush me straight to the zeppelin mooring at the art deco summit, where they keep the huge dirigible of August tied up and bobbing in the high winds. On the way to the shining needle at the top I will wear a lot of neckties, I will buy five or six works of genius on 45 rpm, and perhaps too many times I will find myself looking at the snapped spineof a lemon wedge at the bottom of a drink. I said, I anticipate a coming season of dilated time and of women all in disarray."

My father told me that I was overwrought and that Claire had had an unfortunate influence on my speech, but something in his face said that he understood. That night he flew back to Washington, and the next day, for the first time in years, I looked in the newspaper for some lurid record of the effect of his visit, but of course there was none. He wasn't that kind of gangster.

Claire had moved out on the thirtieth of April, taking with her all of the Joni Mitchell and the complete soundtrack recording of the dialogue from Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet, a four-record set, which she knew by heart. At some point toward the sexless and conversationless finale of Art and Claire, I had informed her that my father said she suffered from dementia praecox. My father's influence upon me was strong, and I believed this. I later told people that I had lived with a crazy woman, and also that I had had enough of Romeo and Juliet.

The last term in my last year of college sputtered out in a week-long fusillade of examinations and sentimental alcohol conferences with professors whom I knew I would not really miss, even as I shook their hands and bought them beers. There was, however, a last paper on Freud's letters to Wilhelm Fliess, for which I realized I would have to make one exasperating last visit to the library, the dead core of my education, the white, silent kernel of every empty Sunday I had spent trying to ravish the faint charms of the study of economics, my sad and cynical major.

So one day at the beginning of June I came around the concrete comer that gave way to the marbleized steps of the library. Walking the length of brown ground-floor windows, I looked into them, at the reflection of my walk, my loafers, my mess of hair. Then I felt guilty, because at our lunch my father, the amateur psychologist, had called me a "devout narcissist" and had said he worried that I might be "doomed to terminal adolescence." I looked away.

There were very few students using the building this late in the term, which was officially over. A few pink-eyed and unshaven pages loitered behind the big checkout counter, staring out at the brown sun through the huge tinted windows. I clicked loudly in my loafers across the tile floor. As I called for the elevator to the Freud section, a girl looked up. She was in a window; there was an aqua ribbon in her hair. The window was a kind of grille, as in a bank, at the far end of the corridor in which I stood waiting for the elevator, and the girl in the window held a book in one hand and a thin strip of wire in the other. We looked at each other for perhaps three seconds, then I turned back to face the suddenly illuminated red Up arrow, the muscles in my neck warming and tightening. As I stepped into the car...

The Mysteries of Pittsburgh
A Novel
. Copyright © by Michael Chabon. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Meet the Author

Michael Chabon is the bestselling and Pulitzer Prize–winning author of the novels The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, The Final Solution, The Yiddish Policemen’s Union, Gentlemen of the Road, and Telegraph Avenue; the short story collections A Model World and Werewolves in Their Youth; and the essay collections Maps and Legends and Manhood for Amateurs. He lives in Berkeley, California, with his wife, the novelist Ayelet Waldman, and their children.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Berkeley, California
Date of Birth:
May 24, 1963
Place of Birth:
Washington, D.C.
Education:
B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.F.A., University of California at Irvine
Website:
http://www.michaelchabon.com/

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