The Mysterious Stranger

The Mysterious Stranger

3.7 12
by Mark Twain
     
 

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One of the demons Twain always set out to slay was the legend that the citizens of this republic are inherently more virtuous than others. He does so marvelously in this collection of classic tales.

The collection includes: "The Mysterious Stranger," "The Story of the Bad Little Boy," "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," "The Diary of Adam and Eve,"

Overview

One of the demons Twain always set out to slay was the legend that the citizens of this republic are inherently more virtuous than others. He does so marvelously in this collection of classic tales.

The collection includes: "The Mysterious Stranger," "The Story of the Bad Little Boy," "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," "The Diary of Adam and Eve," "The Joke That Made Ed's Fortune," "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg," "Edward Mills and George Benton: A Tale," and "A Fable."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781573920391
Publisher:
Prometheus Books
Publication date:
09/28/1995
Series:
Literary Classics Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
1
Sales rank:
379,026
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.27(d)

Meet the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 - April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American novelist and humorist. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called "The Great American Novel".

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
November 30, 1835
Date of Death:
April 21, 1910
Place of Birth:
Florida, Missouri
Place of Death:
Redding, Connecticut

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The Mysterious Stranger 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Lorsine More than 1 year ago
The Mysterious Stranger is one of Mark Twain¿s better works¿not as lengthy as Tom Sawyer, and not as boring as Huckleberry Finn. Time will not be wasted if you choose to read this story, especially since it is about 100 pages in a book format.

With a direct allusion to Satan, Twain emphasizes the negativity of humans. This emphasis makes us think about ourselves and wonder if we really are that selfish. The boys who mindlessly allow Satan to brainwash them show the naivety of children as well as our selfishness.

At the same time, because Satan stresses that he is from Heaven and not Hell, Twain shows his pessimistic view of Christianity in general. He makes us wonder if God is actually someone worthwhile to follow (speaking from a Buddhist perspective).

It is entertaining and engaging¿I could not put it down once I started. Even the mere conversations between Satan and the boys seem to hold significant meaning to the story; it is a good story to ponder about.

This short story is supposedly unfinished, but it seems to end quite well. If you want a quick insight into Twain¿s views, the Mysterious Stranger is the way to go.
Christine Hale More than 1 year ago
It is a short book, a quick read, but very good! I highly recommend it.
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dmh5026 More than 1 year ago
My headline says it all. There's only so much sarcasm I can take -- and these 186 pages were about all I could handle. Not my favorite.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
scanned version is unreadable