Myth and Philosophy: A Contest of Truths / Edition 1

Myth and Philosophy: A Contest of Truths / Edition 1

by Lawrence J. J. Hatab
     
 

Myth and Philosophy is more than an interpretive study, inspired by Nietzsche and Heidegger, of the historical relationship between myth and philosophy in ancient Greece. Its conclusions go beyond the historical case study and amount to a defense of the intelligibility of myth against an exclusively 'rational' or 'objective' view of the world.

Hatab pleads for a

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Overview

Myth and Philosophy is more than an interpretive study, inspired by Nietzsche and Heidegger, of the historical relationship between myth and philosophy in ancient Greece. Its conclusions go beyond the historical case study and amount to a defense of the intelligibility of myth against an exclusively 'rational' or 'objective' view of the world.

Hatab pleads for a pluralistic notion of truth, one which permits different forms of understanding and surrenders the supposed need for a uniform or even hierarchical conception of truth.

The historical displacement of myth by philosophy in ancient Greece is Hatab's point of departure. Rationality and science emerged as the revolutionary overthrow of myth -- but that revolution is not beyond criticism, for myth presents a meaningful expression of the world, different from, and not always commensurate with, the kind of understanding sought by philosophers. The notion that philosophy has corrected the ignorance of the past is unwarranted; furthermore, philosophy continues to exhibit elements of the mythic world from which it emerged.

Myth and Philosophy offers a general analysis of myth and a specific analysis of Greek myth. Hatab distinguishes the different senses of truth found in mytho-poetic and rational-scientific disclosures, and presents an original treatment of Plato and Aristotle, challenging their criticisms of traditional myth.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780812691160
Publisher:
Open Court Publishing Company
Publication date:
01/01/1990
Pages:
397
Product dimensions:
6.02(w) x 8.99(h) x 1.04(d)

Table of Contents

Prefacexi
Introduction1
IA Phenomenological Analysis of Myth17
The General Framework17
Origins
Lived World
Culture
Sacred and profane
Mystery
Existential transcendence
Myth and Sense29
Myth and Conceptual Reason30
General Themes39
Myth and the establishment of world
The existential circle
Consciousness and the self
Myth, art, and appearance
Myth and reflection
IIGreek Myth and Religion47
General Characteristics47
Religion of the earth
Mortality
Gods and humans
Festivity
The Olympian-Titan distinction
The Nonrational and Nonconscious in Greek Religion56
Sacred madness
The shaman
Hesiod's Theogony63
IIIEpic Poetry69
The World in Epic Poetry69
The Self in Epic Poetry72
The heroic ideal
The noncentralized self
The divine-human relation
The Beginnings of a Break with the Epic World88
IVLyric Poetry in the Archaic Age97
The Archaic World View98
The Emergence of Self-Consciousness in Lyric Poetry103
Pindar: Heroism's Refrain108
VTragic Poetry113
Tragedy and Greek Religion113
Nietzsche on tragedy
The link with epic poetry Dionysus
Tragedy and the Dionysian Tradition130
The Self in Tragic Poetry132
The Tragic Poets134
Aeschylus
Sophocles
Euripides
Tragedy and Myth149
VIThe Advent of Philosophy157
The Beginnings: Hesiod and Thales160
The First Philosophers164
Xenophanes
Anaximander
Heraclitus
Parmenides
Time and Process191
Early Philosophy and Myth193
Consciousness, Unity, and Philosophy199
Cultural Resistance to Philosophy202
VIIPlato207
Revolutionary Elements in Platonism208
The reflective individual
A new view of the soul
New intellectual criterial
Philosophy
Morality
Traditional Elements in Platonism223
A correlation between knowing and doing
The social self
The rejection of Sophistic relativism and humanism
Aristocracy in platonism
Intuition in platonism
Plato and Myth237
The Timaeus
Plato's criticism of traditional myth
Mythical and phenomenological aspects of Plato's Philosophy
VIIIAristotle259
The Origins of Natural Philosophy262
Aristotle's Philosophy266
General principles
Individuation and desacralization
Aristotle's conception of time
Aristotle's Revolution282
Traditional Elements in Aristotle's Though286
The soul
The social self
Virtue
Teleology
Intuition
IXThe Relationship Between Philosophy and Myth293
Summary Conclusions and Reflections293
Platonic philosophy
Philosophy and existential meaning
Consciousness
Myth and Nonobjective Aspects of Thought304
Myth, fact, and mystery
Subjectivity, objectivity, and pluralism
Myth, science, and explanation
Myth, Truth, and Certainty317
Notes329
Selected Bibliography365
Index371

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