Myth of Multitasking: How Doing It All Gets Nothing Done

( 9 )

Overview

The Myth of Multitasking

"Remember this rule: the more responsibility you have, the morehats you wear, the more likely you are to become inefficient."

In a compelling business fable, The Myth of Multitaskingconfronts a popular idea that has come to define our hectic,work-a-day world. This simple yet powerful book shows clearly whymultitasking is, in fact, a lie that wastes time and costs money.Far from being efficient, multitasking actually ...

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Overview

The Myth of Multitasking

"Remember this rule: the more responsibility you have, the morehats you wear, the more likely you are to become inefficient."

In a compelling business fable, The Myth of Multitaskingconfronts a popular idea that has come to define our hectic,work-a-day world. This simple yet powerful book shows clearly whymultitasking is, in fact, a lie that wastes time and costs money.Far from being efficient, multitasking actually damagesproductivity and relationships at work and at home.

In his groundbreaking book, management expert Dave Crenshawoffers clear solutions for dealing with today'sinformation-saturated world. He shows what to do when interruptedby co-workers and how to deal with distracting electroniccommunications such as e-mail and phone messages. Written with witand a healthy dose of wisdom, The Myth of Multitasking helpsbusiness leaders and employees

  • Recognize why multitasking is a false construct
  • Understand the difference between background-tasking andswitchtasking
  • Create a new and realistic weekly budget forusing time
  • Schedule recurring appointments withkey people

For anyone who has difficulty focusing on the task at hand orpaying attention to others when they are speaking, The Myth ofMultitasking is an invaluable resource.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This little book was both a pleasure to read and offered some very practical advice in the form of a modern day fable." (Oliver Starr, Editor, Getting Things Done Times)

"Are you a master of juggling e-mail, voice mail, cell-phone calls and the like? No, you're not, says this slim fable-cum-manifesto against multitasking. The author, a business coach, gently ridicules the idea that anyone can concentrate on two things at the same time." (Andrea Sachs, Senior Reporter, Time Magazine, November 2, 2008)

"This simple yet powerful book shows clearly why multitasking is, in fact, a lie that wastes time and costs money. Far from being efficient, multitasking actually damages productivity and relationships at work and at home." (businessskillbooks.blogspot.com, November 24, 2008)

"I applaud Crenshaw for taking on a popular buzzword and small-scale plague not only in business life, but also our day-to-day world. Multitasking is indeed a myth. I would be tempted to be more vigorous in my rhetoric and say that multitasking is a fraud and a thief." (businesscoach.us.com, November 24, 2008)

"Crenshaw's on a mission to reduce distractions, interruptions, and fire-fighting at work, and create environments that let employees see through tasks with their full attention before moving onto the next thing." (blumerlamotte.blogspot.com, October 13, 2008)

Library Journal

The growth of email and text messages, among other innovations, has made time management at work more of a challenge. Keeping up with all of this simultaneous communication can become counterproductive. Business coach Crenshaw (founder, Fresh Juice Strategy) addresses the myths about multitasking and argues that it can in fact cost valuable time to employees. Crenshaw frames his book in the form of a fictional case study: "Phil," a consultant, is about to meet with the manager of retail clothing chain "GreenGarb: Clothes Mother Nature Intended" about improving employees' time management skills. Crenshaw's point is that the notion of multitasking is a false construct that costs both time and money. In fact, employees are "switch tasking" (switching back and forth between two or more tasks). Crenshaw claims that "background tasking" (doing two or more tasks, with only one of them requiring mental effort) could be more efficient and effective. Currently, employees lose time owing to interruptions by coworkers, distractions from new technologies, lack of attention to colleagues when they are speaking, and juggling home and work. The author also provides exercises for employees to measure their efficiency and effective use of time. Bibliographic citations are included, but a glossary would have been helpful. Overall, readable and thought-provoking; recommended for public and academic libraries.-Lucy Heckman, St. John's Univ., Jamaica, NY

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470372258
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 8/18/2008
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 579,724
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Dave Crenshaw is a business coach and founder of Fresh Juice Strategy. He coaches and trains CEOs and management teams worldwide. Crenshaw is a graduate of Brigham Young University's Marriot School of Management and a frequent keynote speaker.

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Table of Contents

The Company.

The Owner.

The Lie.

The Cost.

The Origin.

The Exercise.

The Example.

The Question.

The Meeting.

The Expectation.

The Truth.

The Deal.

The Change.

The Steps.

The Systems.

The Follow-up.

Worksheets.

Resources.

The Author.

Index.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 4, 2012

    Excellent Book - Quick, Easy Read

    This is an excellent book. Provides knowledge about the "myth' of multitasking. Book is a quick and easy read. The principles in the book actually changed my perspective and gave me tools to effectively change the way I live.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2011

    Good premise, but SO short

    I guess its good that it gets to the point, but I cant say I learned anything new and it was SO short. I probably should have read the description more thoroughly. Not sure it was worth the price.

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  • Posted June 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Handy time management guide, sans multitasking

    Dave Crenshaw has managed to stretch a clear, simple concept into an entire book, but it is a useful, helpful concept. Crenshaw debunks the myth that multitasking can be effective and advocates focusing on one task at a time instead. He teaches this lesson by telling the story of a gifted business coach, Phil, and his stressed-out client, Helen. He uses the format of a business novel to demonstrate that multitasking is not an efficient way to get things done. Every time a person changes from one task to another, which Crenshaw calls "switchtasking," he or she loses time and focus. The remedy, the author explains, is to cut down on interruptions, manage how you allocate your time and concentrate on a single task at once. This is not exactly a groundbreaking theory in time management, but it is certainly a helpful reminder. getAbstract suggests this book to managers who must help employees handle their time and to people who need guidance to quit multitasking so they can actually get things done.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2009

    A Lesson On Productivity

    Dave Crenshaw's The Myth of Multitasking, is a story of how to make the best of what time you have. It starts off with Phil, who is brought to a company to make it work more efficiently. Helen (an influential executive who runs the company that is struggling) is skeptical of Phil's advice. Phil tells her that multitasking is a lie and that what most people see as multitasking is really switch tasking. He also tells her that switch tasking is not good in any situation. When Helen follows Phil's instructions she and the company become happier and more productive.
    The lessons that Phil teaches Helen and her company can be applied in everyday life. These lessons are not just for someone running a company but for anyone who wants to improve whatever they do. This book has many interesting facts that support the lessons. Most of these facts were compiled by universities and theologians. This book does not only inspire but it also aids people in building upon their inspiration.

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    Posted April 10, 2011

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    Posted April 16, 2009

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    Posted June 28, 2011

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    Posted April 27, 2011

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    Posted April 26, 2010

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