The Myth of Sacred Prostitution in Antiquity

The Myth of Sacred Prostitution in Antiquity

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by Stephanie Lynn Budin
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521880904

ISBN-13: 9780521880909

Pub. Date: 12/31/2007

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

In this study, Stephanie Budin demonstrates that sacred prostitution, the sale of a person’s body for sex in which some or all of the money earned was devoted to a deity or a temple, did not exist in the ancient world. Reconsidering the evidence from the ancient Near East, the Greco-Roman texts, and the Early Christian authors, Budin shows that the majority of…  See more details below

Overview

In this study, Stephanie Budin demonstrates that sacred prostitution, the sale of a person’s body for sex in which some or all of the money earned was devoted to a deity or a temple, did not exist in the ancient world. Reconsidering the evidence from the ancient Near East, the Greco-Roman texts, and the Early Christian authors, Budin shows that the majority of sources that have traditionally been understood as pertaining to sacred prostitution actually have nothing to do with this institution. The few texts that are usually invoked on this subject are, moreover, terribly misunderstood. Furthermore, contrary to many current hypotheses, the creation of the myth of sacred prostitution has nothing to do with notions of accusation or the construction of a decadent, Oriental “Other.” Instead, the myth has come into being as a result of more than 2,000 years of misinterpretations, false assumptions, and faulty methodology. The study of sacred prostitution is, effectively, a historiographical reckoning.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521880909
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
12/31/2007
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.98(d)

Table of Contents

1. Introduction; 2. The ancient Near Eastern data; 3. The so-called 'evidence'; 4. Herodotos; 5. In the footsteps of Herodotos: Lucian and 'Jeremiah'; 6. Pindar Fragment 122; 7. Strabo, confused and misunderstood; 8. Klearkhos, Justinus, and Valerius Maximus; 9. Archaeological 'evidence' from Italy; 10. The early Christian rhetoric; 11. Last myths.

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The Myth of Sacred Prostitution in Antiquity 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
manirul01 More than 1 year ago
Awesome....!Beautiful....!Wonderful....!I really enjoy it.....!