The Myth of Sisyphus: And Other Essays

The Myth of Sisyphus: And Other Essays

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by Albert Camus
     
 

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One of the most influential works of this century, The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays is a crucial exposition of existentialist thought. Influenced by works such as Don Juan and the novels of Kafka, these essays begin with a meditation on suicide; the question of living or not living in a universe devoid of order or meaning. With lyric eloquence,…  See more details below

Overview

One of the most influential works of this century, The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays is a crucial exposition of existentialist thought. Influenced by works such as Don Juan and the novels of Kafka, these essays begin with a meditation on suicide; the question of living or not living in a universe devoid of order or meaning. With lyric eloquence, Albert Camus brilliantly posits a way out of despair, reaffirming the value of personal existence, and the possibility of life lived with dignity and authenticity.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307827821
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/31/2012
Series:
Vintage International
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
105,175
File size:
2 MB

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The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
MerleF More than 1 year ago
This is a specialized book, mostly for those interested in philosophy, French culture, and Camus the writer. I bought it as I had read more about Camus in Brave Genius by S B Carroll, a book about Camus and J. Monod, both Nobel Prize winners. Camus' Myth of Sisyphus is a major work by Camus, and the other essays in the book are interesting, but somewhat varied in importance, though they do reveal much about Camus' life.
AdamZ1 More than 1 year ago
Anyone wishing to better understand Camus' novels would do well to read this book, as it is a sort of precursor to them. If one hasn't read any Camus before, I would recommend skipping this book and going straight to his novel, THE PLAGUE, then coming back to this book afterward.
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Israel5 More than 1 year ago
A philosopher said: "I have thought about 3 seconds in deep thought each year. And nothing more." This must be true of Camus. He must have spent several seconds thinking of the absurd. And this is monstrous more than the average thinker. We on the other hand think of one tenth of a second in deep thought in his entire life. Because, this philosophical work burns. And one can not touch it for too long. Sisyphus was punished by the gods and commanded to carry a huge rock up a mountain, then let it drop back, repeat again... This book is supposed to be about suicide, and it is. Life was equated to Sisyphus' absurd punishment. And we ask ourselves then why do we live at all? But it is also about: atheism and Reason. My favorite quote from the book:"Reflection on suicide gives me an opportunity to raise the only problem to interest me: is there a logic to the point of death?" Leads me to the criticism of Reason. And this reason is the atheistic Reason. If one adhered to God "logic to the point of death?" The question will never arise. But the conclusion is not much of importance. "One must imagine Sisyphus happy." This is simple formalism. Life as a story, can end good, bad, and something else. Camus in this book chose "good" But truly the ending does not come at the end. "the happy Sisyphus". But rather in the middle of the work. "The proceeding merely defines a way of thinking. But the point is to live."
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This essay is great! It makes you question yourself! I thought that it was well written with some amazing points! It is interest to see that some of the same social and economic problems that Sisyphus delt with still plagues us today. You're think by now, that some of these problems would have been solved. This essay was an eye opener, & true learning experience!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This short collection is an excellent way to introduce yourself to one of the most interesting writers and thinkers of the mid-20th century. Camus introduces his thoughts into the 'absurd' with both style and enlightenment. This work is a good foundation before reading other great works by Camus, such as The Stranger or The Fall.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Myth of Sisyphus gets right to the point. The problem is is suicide the answer to the absurd. If you are not familiar with Camus¿ definition of the absurd you will have to work a little harder to understand the problem and why the answer is no, suicide is not an answer. I am not giving away anything here as Camus gives the answer right in the preface. Read the preface. Read the book. If you are not sure, read it again. Camus presents evidence as he sees fit and writes lyrically, thus the book is dense and meandering at times. It is worth the trouble.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Between Kafka and Borges there enters Camus.And Camus has a voice and a life which are at once more moderate and earth- bound than the other two great modern masters of the parable and myth.If the figure chosen as emblem and title is the absurd Sisyphus rolling once again a rock up a hill which he knows will perpetually roll down again , there is nonetheless consolation in the beauty which Camus makes of the effort. Life is meaningful despite its being absurd, Camus seems to say, and all who read this collection will feel enriched at hearing one of the great humanistic voices of the twentieth century in all its love for life.