Myths and folk-lore of Ireland

Myths and folk-lore of Ireland

by Jeremiah Curtin
     
 

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Jeremiah Curtin was an American born translator and folklorist. In "Myths and Folk-Lore of Ireland" Curtin turns his attention to the tales of the island nation of Ireland. In this collection you will find the following tales: The Son of the King of Erin and the Giant of Loch Lein, The Three Daughters of King O'Hara, The Weaver's Don and the Giant of the White

Overview

Jeremiah Curtin was an American born translator and folklorist. In "Myths and Folk-Lore of Ireland" Curtin turns his attention to the tales of the island nation of Ireland. In this collection you will find the following tales: The Son of the King of Erin and the Giant of Loch Lein, The Three Daughters of King O'Hara, The Weaver's Don and the Giant of the White Hill, Fair, Brown and Trembling, The King of Erin and the Queen of the Lonesome Island, The Shee an Gannon and the Grugach Gaire, The Three Daughters of the King of the East and the Son of a King in Erin, The Fisherman's Son and the Grugach of Tricks, The Thirteenth Son of the King of Erin, Kil Arthur, Shaking-Head, Birth of Fin MacCumhail, Fin MacCumhail and the Fenians of Erin in the Castle of Fear Dubh, Fin MacCumhail and the Knight of the Full Axe, Gilla na Grakin and Fin MacCumhail, Fin MacCumhail, The Seven Brothers and the King of France, Black, Brown and Gray, Fin MacCumhail and the Son of the King of Alba, Cuculin, and Oisin in Tir Na N-Og.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940020316799
Publisher:
London : S. Low, Marson, Searle [and] Rivington
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
414 KB

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THE THREE DAUGHTERS OF KING O'HARA. THERE was a king in Desmond whose name was Coluath O'Hara, and he had three daughters. On a time when the king was away from home, the eldest daughter took a thought that she 'd like to be married. So she went up in the castle, put on the cloak of darkness which her father had, and wished for the most beautiful man under the sun as a husband for herself. She got her wish; for scarcely had she put off the cloak of darkness, when there came, in a golden coach with four horses, two black and two white, the finest man she had ever laid eyes on, and took her away. When the second daughter saw what had happened to her sister, she put on the cloak of darkness, and wished for the next best man in the world as a husband. She put off the cloak; and straightway there came, in a golden coach with four black horses, a man nearly as good as the first, and took her away. The third sister put on the cloak, and wished for the best white dog in the world. Presently he came, with one man attending, in a golden coach and four snow-white horses, and took the youngest sister away. When the king came home, the stable-boy told him what had happened while he was gone. He was enraged beyond measure when he heard that his youngest daughter had wished for a white dog, and gone off with him. When the first man brought his wife home he asked: " In what form will you have me in the daytime, as I am now in the daytime, or as I am now at night? " " As you are now in the daytime." So the first sister had her husband as a man in the daytime; but at night he was a seal. The second man put the same question to the middle sister, and got the same answer; so the second sister hadher husband in the same form as the first. When the third sister c...

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