Naebody's Hero

( 4 )

Overview

POWER DOESN'T ALWAYS CORRUPT

Abandoned by his parents as a child, Rob Hamilton has developed an unshakeable sense of right and wrong. He also has some very special gifts. If he can stop hiding from them and get his life together he may just be the greatest hero the world will never know.

Arif Ali is an English teenager from Battersea, London who is now living and studying in Pakistan. Arif is about to become a prized asset of Al-Qaeda. He and ...

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More About This Book

Overview

POWER DOESN'T ALWAYS CORRUPT

Abandoned by his parents as a child, Rob Hamilton has developed an unshakeable sense of right and wrong. He also has some very special gifts. If he can stop hiding from them and get his life together he may just be the greatest hero the world will never know.

Arif Ali is an English teenager from Battersea, London who is now living and studying in Pakistan. Arif is about to become a prized asset of Al-Qaeda. He and Rob will form an unlikely friendship that will alter one of the most notorious days in American history.

Kim is an American intelligence agent from Ann Arbor, Michigan. She heads up the agency's anti-terrorist response, is an obsessive workaholic and is relentless in the pursuit of justice. Kim could be the worst enemy the friends have, or their greatest ally.

Set in Scotland, England, Pakistan, Afghanistan, France and the United States; Naebody's Hero is a fast-paced global thriller spanning four decades, reaching its climax on one horrific day in September, 2001.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781481943178
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 2/2/2013
  • Pages: 356
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 23, 2013

    This story combines three different people together from across

    This story combines three different people together from across the world and from a wide range of time periods all coming together on September 11, 2001. 




    Robert Hamilton is a young boy who was abandoned by his parents and sister and is immediately put into foster care. It isn't soon after that he discovers he has supernatural powers and can can perform things no normal human can do. He has incredible strength, speed and the ability to fly. He even has a sense of right and wrong like any other great super hero they portray in the comic books. Rob eventually learns to use his greatest powers to help him live in harmony with his foster family. 




    The second character is Arif Ali who is a young Pakistani boy living in the United Kingdom and is constantly around radical terrorist behaviors. Arif is eventually recruited to become a terrorist. 




    The third character is Kim Hamilton who is a secret agent who has lost her husband and child with an eagerness for revenge against the al-Qaeda. She cannot let those who killed her family, get away with it and eventually she will learn, that it is this extreme desire that prevents her from moving on, and dealing with her grief. Kim inadvertently saves Robert Hamilton from a group of terrorists. Who would have guessed the bad-ass secret agent could end up saving an up and coming superhero? 




    Mark Wilson does a great job at bringing three separate lives into one coincidental event that everyone is a part of. I believe this book was categorized as a thriller, and I have to admit, that this perfectly describes this book. Sometimes, it's hard for some people, to read about events that seemed like they only happened a few years ago. I felt that this book did not disrespect 9/11, or over do the dramatics like I have found many other books to do. I felt it added great emotion and viewpoint for all varieties of readers to enjoy. 




    The only criticism that I have about this book would be the extreme lead up to the character Cara. She was a character that held no value to the story, but yet was written about in great lengths. I would have preferred that the use of those words go to other important parts of the story like bigger lead up to the main characters. Definitely not a big complaint, and I still gladly give it 5/5. 

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  • Posted April 9, 2013

    The story melds the perspective of three very different people t

    The story melds the perspective of three very different people together over several decades and several seas. Robert Hamilton is a young boy who was abandoned by his parents. Separated from his sister, he is raised in foster care. One day he discovers he has extraordinary powers and can perform superhuman feats. Arif Ali is a young Pakistani boy living in the UK. He is frequently exposed to radical and terrorist influences. Finally, Kim Hamilton is an secret agent who has lost her husband and child and is out for answers and possibly revenge. That three such different stories should eventually become entwined is perplexing and an event to behold.

    This story touches on numerous themes and issues that are relevant today, even with the fantastical elements. I like superhero fiction, especially when it works in important issues. Robert's unwavering empathy contrasts sharply with the more revenge driven pursuits of his co-stars, although you can see where each character is coming from and they are all more or less easy to feel a connection to. The writing was so-so. There were some instances of odd, "slangy" grammar that clouded the meaning of sentences. The story is pretty slow to get off the ground as well; for instance it spends a long time establishing Robert's home life and filling in various details that aren't really needed for the reader to understand that he's just an average young boy. Overall there were some really nice moments in this book, and the intertwining perspectives made it worth a read.

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  • Posted March 22, 2013

    Three different areas of the world, and three completely differe

    Three different areas of the world, and three completely different individuals.
    Robert, a child who was abandoned by his parents, was raised by a foster family, separate from his twin sister, Cara.  As he grew, he discovered he had unique abilities and wanted to use them for the good of others.
    Arif, a child born to Pakistani parents, but lived in England and was considered a foreigner and bullied as a child.
    Kim, a woman who lost her husband and infant child way too soon, had a lifelong desire to see those who murdered her family punished and killed for what they had done.
    In a strange twist of fate, Kim saves Robert from a group of terrorists.  Arif is recruited to become a terrorist.
    As the story progresses, Kim and Robert join forces to thwart evil all over the world, and Arif is trained to be a terrorist.  Even though he had met Robert and seen the good he can do, Arif was determined to kill those who had murdered his family.
    Great mix of characters to have the story seen from very different angles and viewpoints, those working for the good of mankind, and those who are not.  Nice flow, chapters are written to focus on one of the three main characters at a time.  Keeps you turning pages to see what evil plot has been created and if it will come to fruition.

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  • Posted March 22, 2013

    Naebody's Hero is wishful thinking in the purest form. It speaks

    Naebody's Hero is wishful thinking in the purest form. It speaks to how much could be prevented if only there was someone with the proper skills and talents to do it. In the case of this novel, there is: Robert Hamilton.

    Robert Hamilton has powers. He's virtually indestructible, can fly, run faster than the speed of sound, and lift impossible weights. Yet the best thing about him is his unwavering empathy and desire to do good in the world. He is so unrelenting in his desire to help as many people as possible, and I really enjoyed reading about him. I think it has a lot to do with how everything he did to help people were things I'd imagined doing as a child to help others. Kicking butt and helping the hungry, abused, and poor. I felt like I was living vicariously through him, and I was ecstatic every time we got mention that he had done something great. Admittedly this was really the only information we got about him, since he was basically perfect. In fact, most of the characters in this don't really have any flaws; they're all pretty black and white. Raheem and Shaaytan and Frank Jr. are bad. Robert, Arif, Azam, Mimi, Frank, Mary, Cara, Jack, and Mike are all good. Kim was the only exception to this, and I really liked that. She was a good guy, to be sure. But her goodness is tinged by the desire for revenge, and it nearly costs the lives of Arif and herself. While I inwardly scolded her for being so crazy, I liked the realness to her character in that way.

    Of course, one thing I really loved about this was the result of the terrorist plot. Thanks to Robert, Kim and Arif, the terrorist plot doesn't go as planned. It's the way I think many people would prefer it to have gone in reality, but sadly that's not the case. However, I don't see this as disrespecting of what happened that day. I know that sometimes movies and books will use major events as a kind of cop out, but I didn't get that from this. I didn't feel as if it was just a cheap way of adding emotion to the novel, and I really appreciate that. Instead, I felt as if it was the manifestation of a desire to change what happened somehow, and I can absolutely relate to that.

    My only complaint is that the beginning was a bit repetitive and slow to start off. There was a lot of buildup with Cara that I felt wasn't really necessary to the plot (I'd go so far as to say Cara isn't really needed at all) and just slowed the progress. The repetition for me was in the early descriptions of Arif through his father's eyes; each chapter about him in the beginning was essentially the same and didn't bring too much new information. Most of it centered around “my boy is handsome and smart and will do great things when I look in his eyes”. It wasn't a deal breaker by any means, but it is noticeable.

    I was very satisfied with Naebody's Hero and I'm happy that I was able to read it. It sets up the next book nicely (I saw it coming!! I knew that person would come back!) and will hopefully answer some questions of mine that arose: Why did his parents leave? Who was that boy who gave him the note? Why isn't Cara gifted as he is? At any rate, it's a great standalone book as well as an action-packed beginner to a series.

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