Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science / Edition 1

Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science / Edition 1

4.3 52
by Charles Wheelan
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0393324869

ISBN-13: 9780393324860

Pub. Date: 09/28/2003

Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.

Formerly the midwest correspondent for The Economist and director of policy and communication for chicago Metropolis 2020, Charles Wheelan is presently a columnist for yahoo! and senior lecturer at the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. He lives in Chicago with his Family.

Overview

Formerly the midwest correspondent for The Economist and director of policy and communication for chicago Metropolis 2020, Charles Wheelan is presently a columnist for yahoo! and senior lecturer at the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. He lives in Chicago with his Family.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393324860
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
09/28/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword Burton G. Malkiel ix

Introduction xvii

Acknowledgments xxvii

1 The Power of Markets: Who feeds Paris? 3

2 Incentives Matter: Why you might be able to save your face by cutting off your nose (if you are a black rhinoceros) 30

3 Government and the Economy: Government is your friend (and a round of applause for all those lawyers) 54

4 Government and the Economy II: The army was lucky to get that screwdriver for $500 80

5 Economics of Information: McDonald's didn't create a better hamburger 104

6 Productivity and Human Capital: Why is Bill Gates so much richer than you are? 126

7 Financial Markets: What economics can tell us about getting rich quick (and losing weight, too!) 148

8 The Power of Organized Interests: What economics can tell us about politics 175

9 Keeping Score: Is my economy bigger than your economy? 191

10 The Federal Reserve: Why that dollar in your pocket is more than just a piece of paper 218

11 International Economics: How did a nice country like Iceland go bust? 243

12 Trade and Globalization: The good news about Asian sweatshops 270

13 Development Economics: The wealth and poverty of nations 294

Epilogue Life in 2050: Seven Questions 317

Notes 327

Index 339

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Naked Economics 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 52 reviews.
vegasbookworm_31 More than 1 year ago
For anyone looking for a way to gain some basic knowledge of economics without the grsphs this is your book. I read it years ago in paperback and am excited to read it again.
Praetor More than 1 year ago
One of the most well written economics books that removes the technical terms and describes economics in layman's terms. If you want to grasp economics in a easily read way, this book is for you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
WillingStudent More than 1 year ago
Wheelan's work is straightforward enough for a beginner (it has, in fact, been used as an Honors Economics textbook in high school) and detailed enough to not seem overly simplistic. The author leads one through the basic ideas and concepts of economics (with much relevant contemporary data) and teaches one to think like an economist. This book is highly recommended for anyone who wishes to find an enjoyable introduction to this "dismal" science.
Nelaine More than 1 year ago
NAKED ECONOMICS came out long before the banking/housing crisis, but the pages on the S&L crisis were a blueprint for the latest finacial debacle. If only the U.S. government had learned its lesson the first time, we would be in a different place today. This book, as it came out long before, does not address that 2007 crash, but the logical progression of comparable behaviors, shown here, leads the reader to an intuitive grasp--not one filled with incomprehensible numbers and mathematical processes--of the issues. Intuition is the key, but there is nothing mystical about it. Wheelan helps the lay person to see economics and understand the behind-the-scenes working of it. An economist who shuns the so-called virtues of "share the wealth," Wheelan reinforces the idea that capitalism ultimately generates wealth and choice, and it tends to provide a better life for almost all, as a result. A free market means that cost cutting will cost jobs, but, over time, progress, not stagnation, is the result. He is not afraid to say, though, that such ideas are always more acceptable in the abstract than when they happen to us. That is a serious issus, seriously addressed. My animosity toward by boards of corporations when they give CEOs huge stock options was transformed by his explanation of the rationale behind such decisions, and their benefit for me, the shareholder in a corporation over which I have no control. I am no less antagonistic toward CEOs for getting so much for doing so little, and for creating a wealth gap that is unconscionable, but at least I now understand the motivation behind the decision. This "dismal" science never really was that, but it seemed a far cry from transformational. Not any longer, because Wheelan knows how to write in a way that challenges the ideas and energizes the mind of the reader.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am the kind of person who likes to have a basic idea of prominent things that are discussed among "fancy people" during dinner parties or casual lunch conversations. With this book you are able to gain a basic understanding of what it means to think like an economist. It reads more like a humor book than a textbook, and the ideas he presents can really get you thinking. I recommend this book to anyone even if the are not planning on ever studying economics because even if you don't study it, it still exists and you should know about it. 
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was really good, got me really excited to be an econ major next year. Probably a little to simple at some parts if you already know a bit about economics, though at other parts some concepts can be tough to grasp. A really great read all around and a good starting point for looking into other works :) highly recommend
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Beverly_Kurtin More than 1 year ago
I breezed though this book and re-read it to make sure that I had understood some of the finer points that had been made. Until now, economics had to do with how much money I had in my checking account (never enough <G>) but now I've got at least enough to discuss the subject more intelligently. The only problem I had with the book was that I sometimes got pretty chilly sitting around reading the book sans clothes. I recommend this book for anyone who would like to have more than just a basic idea of what economics are and how they function in our daily lives.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Just a terrific explanation of the science of economics in plain simple language that makes it easy to understand. Updated version is timely given our present world economic challenges. The explanation of the role that public policy plays in managing the economy is very well written without being political. Highly recomend!
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CarianneCW More than 1 year ago
This book helped me get an A- in a subject I barely understood!
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