Naked Truth: A Modern Woman's Manifesto on Business and What Really Matters

Overview

With Support, Humor, and Perspective, This Provocative Book Outlines New Options for Businesswomen

"Finally! A book that exposes the masculine myths about what it takes to be effective in business and helps women reclaim the relational intelligence we have been taught to ignore. A must-read for all women who want to increase their power and influence in the workplace–especially those who are thinking of leaving because they are tired of the corporate gamesmanship that requires ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $8.51   
  • Used (29) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$8.51
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(1636)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New

Ships from: Fort Worth, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$58.77
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(214)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

With Support, Humor, and Perspective, This Provocative Book Outlines New Options for Businesswomen

"Finally! A book that exposes the masculine myths about what it takes to be effective in business and helps women reclaim the relational intelligence we have been taught to ignore. A must-read for all women who want to increase their power and influence in the workplace–especially those who are thinking of leaving because they are tired of the corporate gamesmanship that requires splitting themselves into a 'work me' and a 'home me.'"
Joyce K. Fletcher, professor of management, Simmons School of Management, Boston, Massachusetts

"Margaret Heffernan has provided us with that rarest commodity of all–a 'wise book.' It's 'well written.' It's got 'great stories.' But mostly it's wise; it deserves to be read carefully and digested. I, frankly, was mesmerized by virtually every page and every vignette. Bravo!"
Tom Peters

"What I like about Margaret's book (and Margaret for that matter) is the no-nonsense approach she brings to the topic of women in business. It's not just that she sounds like the mentor you wish you had, it's also that she doesn't shy away from any topic, refuses to sugar-coat her own experience or her advice, and recognizes that the issues of women in business won't get serious discussion until they cease to be a them-against-us mindless posture. She's real. She's smart. She's experienced. She speaks the truth. What more could you want?"
Alan Webber, founding editor, Fast Company

"They say the truth will set you free. It can also make you hopping mad! At a time when so many have given up telling the truth about women and men in the traditional corporation, along comes Margaret Heffernan prepared to take on the truth with a clear eye and a wry smile. Get free! Get mad! Let it stir you into action. Let it inspire you to roll up your sleeves and build a new kind of workplace–one that honors the complex realities of our twenty-first century lives."
Shoshana Zuboff, Charles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School, and coauthor, The Support Economy

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“…The Naked Truth is about choice…about taking risks and assessing whether you want that choice enough…then you may be recognised, successful, fulfilled and happy…” (AccountingWebUK, 9th August 2005)

“…purports to identify the four types of women who populate office life” (The Guardian, 8th November 2004)

“…Heffernan’s book gives strategies for dealing with toxic bosses and misogynistic environments…” (The Times T2, 2nd November 2004)

“…she (the author) perceptively dissects the nature of power and its source…” (Management Today, November 2004)

“…thought-provoking book …” (Western Daily Press – Bristol, 27 October 2004)

"I never wanted to work in business," writes Heffernan. Twenty years after expressing that sentiment, as CEO of a technology company, she found herself "having the time of my life" and wondered whether she had "completely lost my mind? Or sold my soul?" Heffernan sees "women creating a new business order that places values at the heart of business, takes sustainability seriously, and recognizes that business is and always will be emotional." Eleven chapters are peppered with her own illustrative anecdotes and insights plus those of 63 career women representing a wide variety of positions and professions. These contain instructive descriptions of potential pitfalls and urgent advice, each one ending with a list of "Travel Thoughts" to keep in mind. Readers are told how to climb the corporate ladder, maintain a female identity, navigate toxic environments, see through common fallacies, acquire power, balance work with personal life, break into top management, assert autonomy, strike out on their own and reinvent a "parallel universe" of humanitarian alternatives. Nothing is new or told in a fresh way, but Heffernan delivers the catalogue of female careerist frustration succinctly and sympathetically. (Sept.) (Publishers Weekly, September 20, 2004)

“…a provocative new business book…aims to offer practical solutions to difficulties women might encounter in the workplace…” (The Daily Telegraph, 12 August 2004)

Publishers Weekly
"I never wanted to work in business," writes Heffernan. Twenty years after expressing that sentiment, as CEO of a technology company, she found herself "having the time of my life" and wondered whether she had "completely lost my mind? Or sold my soul?" Heffernan sees "women creating a new business order that places values at the heart of business, takes sustainability seriously, and recognizes that business is and always will be emotional." Eleven chapters are peppered with her own illustrative anecdotes and insights plus those of 63 career women representing a wide variety of positions and professions. These contain instructive descriptions of potential pitfalls and urgent advice, each one ending with a list of "Travel Thoughts" to keep in mind. Readers are told how to climb the corporate ladder, maintain a female identity, navigate toxic environments, see through common fallacies, acquire power, balance work with personal life, break into top management, assert autonomy, strike out on their own and reinvent a "parallel universe" of humanitarian alternatives. Nothing is new or told in a fresh way, but Heffernan delivers the catalogue of female careerist frustration succinctly and sympathetically. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780787971434
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/28/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.33 (h) x 1.06 (d)

Meet the Author

Margaret Heffernan has been CEO of five different businesses (both old economy and new) in the United States and the United Kingdom. A former producer for the BBC, she has consulted for film and television and has been acknowledged as one of the top industry executives by the Silicon Alley Reporter, Streaming Media, and the Hollywood Reporter. She speaks regularly at industry and business school conferences and has appeared on NPR's Talk of the Nation and Marketplace as well as CNN and CNBC. She is a regular contributor to Real Business and Fast Company magazines.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface ix

Participants xiii

Introduction 1

1 Start Smart 6

2 Geishas, Bitches, Guys—and the Invisible Woman 26

3 Balls to the Wall: Toxic Bosses and Hostile Environments 52

4 The Emperor's New Clothes 77

5 Power and Where It Comes From 93

6 Sex, Love, and a Vision for Life 120

7 The Whole Life 139

8 How High Can You Go? 163

9 Breaking Up Is Hard to Do 186

10 The Entrepreneuse 200

11 The Parallel Universe 217

Notes 231

Web Resources 237

Bibliography 241

Acknowledgments 247

The Author 251

Index 253

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

The Naked Truth

A Working Woman's Manifesto on Business and What Really Matters
By Margaret A. Heffernan

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7879-7143-X


Chapter One

Start Smart

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. -Nelson Mandela

What do you want to be when you grow up? It is a question we ask children of all ages, not because we are prepared to take the answer seriously but because we believe the response is a gateway to the child's inner fantasies and obsessions. As we get older, all that changes is that we expect the answer to get serious. Saying you want to be a saint at age five is cute but at age twenty-five it starts to sound neurotic and-worst sin of all-impractical.

The question persists across generations because it works: it does show us what we value, dream about, care for. And we aspire to work at professions that express these. Finding the right work means knowing who you are-but work, quite often, is also the way that we find out. "What do I want to be when I grow up? How should I know? I'm twenty-two, I haven't done very much yet-and I'm supposed to decide the rest of my life now?"

I would like to be able to offer a formula for figuring out how to identify your life's work. However, although my business career has taught me a lot about women in business and a lot about myself,nothing I've learned produced a quick and easy formula. What women are and what they want is too complex, personal, and rich to be stereotyped. I've done great and hideous jobs, I've worked for peanuts and I've made millions. I've worked in Europe and the United States for gurus and psychopaths and with legions of brilliant men and women. I've learned a lot about what I like and don't like and how to tell the difference. I've learned that opportunism is good, but not good enough, and that there are smart ways of thinking about our careers that help us more quickly reach the places where we really want to be.

What I have learned too is that the journey is different for women. Although it looks like men's and women's careers have become increasingly similar, huge and important distinctions remain. Women are still paid less than men, they advance less easily, they are more likely to leave large corporations to run their own business. Corporate career structures, built by men for men, are anachronistic and wholly out of sync with what women do, need, and value. Women will all tell you that a big part of our careers involves navigating the shoals of preconceptions, stereotypes, and projections that we are born into.

I remember sitting in a room full of brilliant women at a leading investment bank. Together, they probably had more degrees than the government and more intelligence than their board of directors. What was their problem? They didn't know how good they were. Anxious, demoralized, and demotivated by a toxic environment that measured them only by how successfully they imitated men, they found it hard to take themselves seriously as women with unique talents, skills, and opportunities. That experience has been repeated the world over, in every industry I can think of. It's way past time for women to take ourselves seriously, know how good we are, be comfortable with our own energy, skills, and talents-and make sure we put ourselves in positions where these are used, admired, respected, and compensated appropriately.

Karen Price

I am 35, graduated summa cum laude with a BS in civil engineering, I have an MBA, and this past January I left my six-figure management job and a promising career because I couldn't stand it anymore. I felt like a failure for quitting, but I had reached the end of my rope. I wasn't entirely sure what was wrong, I just knew that I felt like part of me was dying. What I thought was success instead had became a death trap.

Karen didn't make mistakes. She got qualified, she was smart, she worked hard. In the eyes of others, she was very successful. Why isn't this a happy ending-yet?

Karen's experience is not unusual. All over the world, girls are going into business. We start off smart, enthusiastic, and optimistic -we work hard and are immensely dedicated. And we succeed. For the first few years, we get accolades, encouragement, and promotions. But as we get more and more power, weird things start to happen. The style and tactics that seemed so successful suddenly stop getting results. We encounter resistance and hostility. Our lives get harder to manage. We enter an Alice-in-Wonderland place where friends become enemies, values become liabilities, success makes us vulnerable and choices feel like strait jackets. We feel that we must have done something wrong somehow and, in our confusion and humiliation, we withdraw, lose confidence-and so find success even more elusive. The problem, we think, must be me. What have I done wrong?

Nothing. We've done nothing wrong. Being smart and working hard are entry-level requirements. But they won't protect you from the weird experience of being a business woman in a world that remains dominated by men and their values. The companies we see today were built by men for men. Reluctantly, grudgingly, they granted women access-at first just to lowly positions but eventually, when it served men's self-interest, to more powerful positions. We called this progress. But everything comes at a price. The price was that we had to behave in ways that men could be comfortable with: we mustn't frighten them, threaten them, usurp them, or in any way disturb their universe. In other words, we were allowed in as long as we didn't change anything. We became gatecrashers.

Because we didn't build the business environment we now move in, it doesn't derive from or express our style or thinking habits. So, sooner or later, every woman is faced with a choice. We can either assimilate-keep working hard to blend in, avoid attention or offense, in order to be accepted-or we can leave the party altogether and go to, or build, a different and more congenial place. That choice is unavoidable, decisive, and utterly personal. Every woman makes it, consciously or unconsciously. Our decision derives from who we are and will define who we become.

Once we understand this, we start to see that most of the difficulties we face aren't our fault. They go with the territory. We can't avoid them; we just have to decide how to deal with them. Whatever we decide, our decision is made easier when we see that we aren't alone, that we can reach out to others for context and advice-context that demonstrates that our challenges aren't exceptional or personal, and advice drawn from the repeated experience of women who've handled the same setbacks. We can overcome any of the challenges hurled at us-it's just a lot easier when we see that we aren't alone and we haven't failed. No woman has ever enjoyed a successful career without help.

What will protect you is knowing that perfect paths aren't an option. Almost no woman has had a wholly unimpeded career; in fact, careers are beginning to look more and more irregular, interrupted, and individual. In choosing a career, what's essential is to remember who you are and what you value, to stay very focused on finding work that is consistent with that, and to be prepared to leave when your identity and values feel like they are dying. Sounds simple, feels hard. The big challenge is not to be successful in business, but to be successful while remaining the woman you want to be.

Ten careers in a lifetime. A hundred thousand hours. That is what a working life is estimated to be. How are you going to spend them? I've had eight careers: radio production, television production, television business affairs, CEO, consultant, business owner, interactive consumer product developer, writer. And I'm not nearly done yet-or at least I don't think I am. Oh, and there's also wife, mother, sister, daughter, friend. Do those count? I think so-even if I didn't choose all of them.

A career is not a job. A career is a path along which you grow. So, when I had my radio production career, I had a different job every year. Same with television. As CEO, I ran several different companies, in different markets. Careers are about growth, development, learning more, making more. But where do you start? And does it matter?

Just because you will have ten careers doesn't mean that choosing them doesn't matter-although it may not be the kind of life-or-death decision that your parents imagined. Because the days of joining one firm-or even one industry-are mostly over, your choice isn't going to make or break you for the rest of your life. You can-you should-experiment. You must make mistakes. What's important is that you put yourself in a place where you can learn, you do learn, you recover quickly from mistakes, you engage with work you value-and you get out if you feel you're dying.

I knew none of this when I started.

Which Way Should I Go? Asked Alice

Before you can begin to think about your career, you have to think about yourself. How important is your career? How important are you to yourself? Are you prepared and able to take seriously what happens to you-or are you prepared to leave this to others?

These sound like absurd questions. I wish they were. But of the many hurdles women face in their careers, the very first is the challenge of taking ourselves seriously. Our expectations for ourselves derive from a myriad of sources-none more potent than our families.

Donna Collins

I was nudged into becoming a registered nurse by my dad. I guess I didn't have exposure to the kind of professionals that may have made me think on a grander scale of ambitions. I had straight A's in honor classes and got accepted to all the colleges I applied to. I wish I'd known there are other careers for women or that I could have applied to Ivy League schools. I was still living my family's expectations of me. I wish I had more exposure to female role models that could have helped me stretch my reach.

Women often start out with ambitions well below their capabilities and we do so because we don't take ourselves, our careers, seriously. We don't plan, we don't think. I've talked to hundreds of women who will say their careers "just happened" or their careers just chose them. They describe themselves as passive characters swept along in someone else's narrative-but they're describing a central activity of their lives. We do ourselves a disservice when we fail to take ourselves seriously-and we set ourselves up to be trivialized by others.

I left a great university with a good degree-and started work as a secretary. This was dumb. I wasn't taking myself seriously. None of my male peers would have contemplated taking such a miserable job. And I was miserable, for years. Miserable enough that I started doing that job badly, which is dangerous because you don't ever get promoted for poor performance, no matter how great your degree is. Underestimating our capabilities and not putting together a bold, ambitious career plan is the recurrent feature of women's careers. We drift-and find ourselves in places we didn't plan and don't like.

Chris Carosella

I started as a receptionist in a financial institution ... no particular reason, it was just a job. One promotion led to another and another. I moved around in the industry, always performed well. It wasn't until I escaped that I realized I had been in a corporate cult. I found out who I was after I left the toxic culture that I had been in for eleven years.

Chris became a senior vice president when she was thirty. Don't our stories prove the Cinderella myth-that you can start at the bottom and end up at the ball? No, they don't. Although legends abound of women starting in lowly positions and clambering to the top, they are grossly misleading, omitting all the pain and humiliation and anger that such career paths provoke. And the legends always leave out the women who didn't make it but were abandoned to badly paid jobs. One of the many reasons women fail to make it to the top is because they start so close to the bottom. Starting down there just makes the journey harder and longer. And makes it more likely you will end up in a place you would never have chosen for yourself if you had taken the time to think about it.

Cindy Solomon

I started as assistant product manager and went up through the system to VP of Sales and Marketing. I did this in 3 years and I'm not that good! What was I thinking? I kept thinking I would be happier in the next job and then the next job. I had no one to talk to because I was the only woman at my level. It is horribly depressing to realize that the assumptions you based your life and work on are based on other people.

Lacking a plan, failing to take ourselves seriously, means we find ourselves fulfilling the needs and expectations of others-satisfying family or corporate goals rather than our own. This passivity bedevils women because so many norms of femininity revolve around putting others first, not being pushy, not being ambitious. Ambitious women are regularly portrayed as sexless harridans, greedy, obsessed with power-who wants to be like them?

Well, no one, of course. But taking ourselves seriously is not selfish or greedy or wrong. In fact, quite the opposite: failing to do so wastes our gifts and diminishes our contribution. We can do more, for ourselves and for those we love, when we put ourselves in places where we can succeed.

Who Am I?

The successful career requires knowing what you want and knowing how to get it. Of these, the second part is easier. Knowing what you want requires tremendous self-knowledge and self-examination. But at the beginning of a career, without a lot of experience, what can you know?

Quite a lot, as it turns out. You've done something-exams, jobs, projects. When you reflect on those, what have you done best? Don't just guess-ask people. They'll have insights you will never see yourself. Think about the work you've done that you are most proud of: what made that so satisfying? Think about work you've failed at or just not enjoyed: what are its characteristics? Depending on how much experience you've had, you may not be able to come up with very complete answers, but once you start asking these questions, you will begin to note how you perform, where you thrive, and where you don't. Start to track how you work and to identify where you get stuck. A career that builds on your strengths is a great place to start-it may be all you need to know. The women with the smoothest careers are those who've followed their passions, regardless of discouragement or obstruction. Love isn't everything but it's a powerful motive.

Continues...


Excerpted from The Naked Truth by Margaret A. Heffernan Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2005

    Loved it!

    A must read for women entering the workforce, changing positions, making life choices, etc. Whether 22 or 62 this is a good read for business women!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2005

    Highly Recommended!

    Author and executive Margaret Heffernan fearlessly declares that decades of advice telling business women to act like men, follow traditional rules and cleave to heartless stereotypes are wrong. Breathe a sigh of relief. It's not you; 'It's the system, stupid!' In her eyes, the business world inherently does not welcome, respect or value women. Refreshingly, instead of blaming women, the author conveys the advice of hundreds of female survey respondents who say men hold the aces in the business world and don't want to share. Honest, funny and sometimes disconcerting, she offers advice, inspiring examples and helpful stories. She explains how to find or create a humane, cooperative, supportive workplace that fits your principles ¿ and how to make a realistic appraisal if you are at the change-it-or-quit stage. The one shortcoming is the author's absolute unstated assumption that women are innately, inevitably more cooperative, honest and caring than men. This stereotype is a two-edged sword, wounding those men who do have sound values, and reinforcing the typecasting that women ought to be sweet and nurturing because it's in their genes. That aside, we recommend Heffernan's clear view of the hurdles that block a woman's path to business success and work-life balance. She confronts painful realities and adapts them, or adapts to them, even if in nontraditional ways. If you have to be one person at work and someone different at home, her dynamic vision can help you pull it all together.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)