The Name Quilt

The Name Quilt

5.0 1
by Phyllis Root, Margot Apple
     
 

A family history in patches and stories

Summer evenings at Grandma’s house always end just the way Sadie likes – with Grandma tucking her in with the name quilt. As Sadie chooses from among the patchwork of hand-stitched names of generations of relatives, Grandma tells story after story – stories of hog-riding and hornets and

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Overview

A family history in patches and stories

Summer evenings at Grandma’s house always end just the way Sadie likes – with Grandma tucking her in with the name quilt. As Sadie chooses from among the patchwork of hand-stitched names of generations of relatives, Grandma tells story after story – stories of hog-riding and hornets and Grandma’s own wedding. Then one summer day, a fierce storm comes on too quickly to get the washing off the line, and the quilt is blown away. That night, Sadie worries that more than just the quilt has disappeared, until Grandma shows her that all her favorite names and stories are more a part of Sadie than she knows.

Phyllis Root’s loving tribute to a bedtime ritual from her own childhood and Margot Apple’s intricate illustrations bring the story of Sadie and the name quilt to the page with just the right touch of humor and heart.

 

The Name Quilt is a 2004 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"In the artwork, as in the text of this warm comforting book, quilts become more than just bedcovers; they are personal keepsakes, reminders of family history, and colorful backgrounds for the characters' lives." — Booklist

"A child and her grandmother forge a new link to their family's past after an old one is lost...Apple's soft-focus rural scenes complement the tale's warm, intimate tone perfectly." —Kirkus Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Root (Grandmother Winter) establishes her story's homespun rural atmosphere right from the start: "Summer evenings, after Sadie and Grandma chased fireflies and drank lemonade and wished on the first star, came the best part of vacations at Grandma's." The "best part" is hearing Grandma's yarns about the relatives whose names she has embroidered on a patchwork quilt. When Sadie points to a square labeled "Avonelle," for example, Grandma tells her how Aunt Nell used to ride the hogs. In an equally colorful, variegated style, Apple (Brave Mama) stitches together the specific story and the quilt that inspired the storytelling. The spread with Aunt Nell shows a girl astride a smiling hog, tromping fantastically across the suddenly gargantuan name quilt. The quilt blows away during a terrible storm, devastating Sadie, but she soon learns that family history is not so easily lost. Root makes the most of the simple, intimate anecdotes that flow between generations, and the crayon-looking drawings bespeak a rustic informality. Ages 4-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Sadie's favorite time at her grandma's is when she is tucked in at night under the patchwork name quilt. Some of the patches have names; each name has a story Grandma can tell her, rich with family history. One day when the quilt is airing on the line and they are off fishing, a sudden storm blows the quilt away. Sadie is very upset. But then she realizes that she still remembers the names and together, she and her grandma can recall the stories as well, so nothing is really lost. They make a new quilt, with Sadie's name included this time. Illustrator Margot Apple's gentle, chalky drawings provide many contextual details to stage the rural adventures: the extensive yard with meandering geese, the simply furnished farmhouse, the fishing pond complete with clumps of cattails. Sadie, Grandma, and the cat are attractive characters, and the book is replete with a sense of family and love. Perhaps this can inspire some intergenerational quilt making for posterity. 2003, Farrar Straus and Giroux,
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-A quilt of memories and names binds Grandma and young Sadie to past loved ones and present adventures during summer vacations. "Grandma had a million stories in that quilt." Francis, Avonelle, Ida, Clayton, Joseph, Orrin-the child comes to know each of these ancestors through her grandmother's stories. Then a terrible wind steals the precious heirloom from the line where it hangs airing. The stories are still a part of their memories, though, and the next day Sadie and her grandmother begin a new quilt that includes patches of fabrics from their own lives. Root stitches together generations, memories, and traditions in this tale of a much-loved family treasure. Apple's soft pastels on full-bleed spreads bring a country feel to Grandma's house and history and provide a backdrop for the yellow boxes of text. Pair this book with Patricia Polacco's Keeping Quilt (S & S, 1988) for a comparison of tales with connection among generations and strength within families.-Mary Elam, Forman Elementary School, Plano, TX Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A child and her grandmother forge a new link to their family's past after an old one is lost. Sadie's vacation days with Grandma always end with a tale; Sadie will point to a name embroidered on her bed's old quilt, and Grandma will recall how once, while harvesting walnuts, Grandpa Francis encountered a bear doing the same, or how Aunt Avonelle liked to ride hogs when she was a youngster, and so on. But after Sadie and Grandma are caught away from the house by a wild storm, and return to find the quilt has vanished from the clothesline, Sadie is distraught to think that the stories are all lost. Grandma knows better: "Hush your crying now. . . . You think I need a quilt to remember for me?" Sadie discovers that she can still visualize the names, too, so together the two set out to remake the quilt, with a new patch for "Sadie." Apple's (Runaway Radish, not reviewed, etc.) soft-focus rural scenes complement the tale's warm, intimate tone perfectly. A low-key alternative to Blumenthal's Aunt Claire's Yellow Beehive Hair (2001) or Patricia Polacco's intergenerational stories. (Picture book. 6-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374354848
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
04/10/2003
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.72(w) x 9.52(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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