Name That Dog

Overview

Got a new puppy and need to find the perfect name? In twenty-six poems, told from A to Z, meet dogs of every type and personality imaginable. Does the puppy love to nap in the flowers? Name her Daisy! Maybe the puppy slips his collar. He's Houdini! And don't forget Melody, a dog who howls and croons to any kind of music.

For pet owners and dog lovers alike, this funny, rhyming collection will be sure to inspire love and laughs for any puppy ...

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Overview

Got a new puppy and need to find the perfect name? In twenty-six poems, told from A to Z, meet dogs of every type and personality imaginable. Does the puppy love to nap in the flowers? Name her Daisy! Maybe the puppy slips his collar. He's Houdini! And don't forget Melody, a dog who howls and croons to any kind of music.

For pet owners and dog lovers alike, this funny, rhyming collection will be sure to inspire love and laughs for any puppy personality.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this ebullient alphabet book of dog names, Archer’s catchy poems are well paired with Buscema’s puppies, whose boldly colored dog portraits have a retro style reminiscent of early Disney cartoons. There’s a black cocker spaniel named Elvis (“His ears look like sideburns./ His fur’s long and black./ And sometimes I wonder/ if Elvis is back!”) and a demure poodle named Noodles, who grasps a pair of chopsticks. A final poem, “The Perfect Name,” notes, “With all the ways to name your dog,/ when all is said and done,/ whatever name you give your dog/ will be the perfect one.” The canine pageantry should delight, while providing some good suggestions from Aspen to Zipper. Ages 3-5. (Apr.)
Publishers Weekly
In this ebullient alphabet book of dog names, Archer’s catchy poems are well paired with Buscema’s puppies, whose boldly colored dog portraits have a retro style reminiscent of early Disney cartoons. There’s a black cocker spaniel named Elvis (“His ears look like sideburns./ His fur’s long and black./ And sometimes I wonder/ if Elvis is back!”) and a demure poodle named Noodles, who grasps a pair of chopsticks. A final poem, “The Perfect Name,” notes, “With all the ways to name your dog,/ when all is said and done,/ whatever name you give your dog/ will be the perfect one.” The canine pageantry should delight, while providing some good suggestions from Aspen to Zipper. Ages 3–5. (Apr.)
Booklist
The poems, representing a variety of styles, read smoothly and are complemented by Buscema's energetic, stylized illustrations.
Booklist
The poems, representing a variety of styles, read smoothly and are complemented by Buscema's energetic, stylized illustrations
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Jolly rhymes offer names from A to Z for those seeking an appropriate name for their dog. Others can just enjoy the descriptions of the dogs with those names, along with the reasons. For example, Aspen is a yellow Lab, who likes to play in the yellow aspen leaves. Bandit, a Boston terrier, not only has black eye patches, but is a snatcher of everything from socks to keys. Frank, a dachshund: "He looks like a/ Hot Dog/ Wiener Dog/ Frankfurter—/ Frank." For Noodles, a poodle: "All over my puppy/ are oodles and oodles/ of swirls of fat curls that/ remind me of noodles." The breed of each dog is noted on the page. The canines and associated objects are painted in a loose manner, emphasizing humorous qualities while incorporating appropriate representational images. The illustrations are more entertaining than for factual reference. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3—This bright collection of canine poetry also serves as an alphabet refresher and a pet-naming guide. Twenty-six poems bookended by an opening and closing poem feature dogs whose monikers generally stem from their looks, behavior traits, or personalities—Bandit, Chewy, Whiskers. Each poem represents a different type of dog, some common, some less so, and one "mixed breed/mutt" named Snickers. Colorful cartoon illustrations have a retro feel and show each pup living up to its name. The rhythm in some of the selections is a little awkward, but dog lovers will enjoy the clever concept.—Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA
Kirkus Reviews
Bright, colorful, humorous pictures show pups in action and why they received the names they did, from Aspen to Zipper. Identifications of dog breeds, sometimes hard to recognize, accompany the poems (doggerel, by and large: Houdini "wriggles from collars / and runs around free. / He unties the knots / from the rope on the tree"). Young pup fanciers might enjoy both Buscema's retro-style art and the names that describe the dogs. Fun-but with a caveat or two. Aside from an egregious verb-form error ("lay" for "lie" in "Aspen"), sometimes the verses are hard to scan for easy reading. Take, for example, these lines: "If you have a white dog, / whatever the size, / Make sure that you're always aware- / if they like white T-shirts / or sleeping on blankets, / they sometimes can give you a scare!" Scansion here and in other selections simply twists the tongue, an unfortunate choice for verses intended for preschoolers. (Picture book/poetry. 3-5)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803733220
  • Publisher: Dial
  • Publication date: 4/1/2010
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 429,859
  • Lexile: NPL (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 10.60 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Peggy Archer was born in Gary, Indiana on Abraham Lincoln’s birthday, back when television shows were only in black and white. She grew up with two brothers and one sister. “We played baseball in the street, explored the woods, and played Hide and Seek after dark. I loved to read. I remember the many times my mother would tell me to ‘get my nose out of a book and go outside and play.’

“I sometimes wrote stories or an occasional poem when I was a little girl, but I didn’t think of writing to be published until I was married and had children. My children liked my stories, and I finally got the courage to send them out to children’s magazines. I had a little bit of luck early on, which encouraged me. It was very appropriate that my first book, One of the Family, was a Little Golden Book, because my mother read Golden books to me as a child.”

Besides writing for children, Peggy works as a registered nurse at St. Anthony’s Hospital and as a school nurse, in Crown Point, Indiana. She enjoys reading, doing word puzzles, walking, country dancing, and spending time with her family. She and her husband have six children and four grandchildren. She lives with her husband, Chuck, and their dog, Snickers, in Valparaiso, Indiana.

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