The Naming of the Dead (Inspector John Rebus Series #16)

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The leaders of the free world descend on Scotland for an international conference, and every cop in the country is needed for front-line duty...except one. John Rebus's reputation precedes him, and his bosses don't want him anywhere near Presidents Bush and Putin, which explains why he's manning an abandoned police station when a call comes in. During a preconference dinner at Edinburgh Castle, a delegate has fallen to his death. Accident, suicide, or something altogether more sinister? And is it linked to a ...

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Boston 2006 Hard Cover First Edition New in New jacket 8vo. Boston: Little, Brown, 2006. First edition, first printing. 8vo. Hard cover binding, 452 pp. Warts and all crime ... writer. New in new dust jacket, protected with an archival-quality mylar cover. Read more Show Less

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The Naming of the Dead (Inspector John Rebus Series #16)

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Overview

The leaders of the free world descend on Scotland for an international conference, and every cop in the country is needed for front-line duty...except one. John Rebus's reputation precedes him, and his bosses don't want him anywhere near Presidents Bush and Putin, which explains why he's manning an abandoned police station when a call comes in. During a preconference dinner at Edinburgh Castle, a delegate has fallen to his death. Accident, suicide, or something altogether more sinister? And is it linked to a grisly find close to the site of the gathering? Are the world's most powerful men at risk from a killer? While the government and secret services attempt to hush the whole thing up, Rebus knows he has only seventy-two hours to find the answers.

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Editorial Reviews

Janet Maslin
A book with this many plot elements risks becoming amorphous and overcomplicated. But Mr. Rankin doesn’t get lost that way. In his backhanded, reluctant way Rebus winds up uniting all the book’s loose ends, and seeing how he accomplishes this is a pleasure. Besides, The Naming of the Dead isn’t really about its detective plot. It’s about Rebus’s taking stock, not only of his own past but also of the world around him.
— The New York Times
Patrick Anderson
Still, the murders are not what the book is about. They give it structure and suspense, but all the Rebus books are finally about the author's sheer joy in storytelling. The Naming of the Dead overflows with characters, plots, subplots, flashbacks, surprises, digressions and details. Rankin's books are not sleek and streamlined but unruly and inclusive; they are, as the song says, ragged but right.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

James Gale proves an excellent choice to narrate this latest entry to the long-running Inspector Rebus series. It's 2005 and Rebus is mourning the unexpected death of his brother. It is a death that will cause a lot of introspective musings for the detective as he sees his retirement edging over the horizon. But soon Rebus and his partner are after a possible serial killer who is doing in former sex offenders. Add to that the apparent suicide of an MP and the horror of the London subway bombings, and you have another first-rate Scottish mystery, that is only enhanced by Gale's performance. Gale's gruff, gravelly delivery brings just the right amount of world weariness to his characterization of Rebus. With the rich array of accents at his disposal, Gale is equally effective in his portrayal of Rankin's supporting characters, especially the smug amoral crime boss Cafferty, who comes across as a smirking, self-satisfied alley cat with fresh bird feathers in his whiskers. Simultaneous release with the Little, Brown hardcover (Reviews, Jan. 22). (May)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

In this 15th novel in the popular Inspector Rebus series, multiple award winner Rankin unfolds a solidly suspenseful mystery tale against the backdrop of the G8 Summit held in Scotland in summer 2005. The G8 gives Rankin reason to inject some wry political commentary into the mix, and it's not at all surprising that Rebus is cynical about politicians and celebrity do-gooders alike. Not only do we get to see several familiar faces from earlier Rebus installments but these characters are developed in a most satisfactory way. (There's also a very funny cameo from one Important World Leader.) Surprisingly, this entry in the Rebus series is not as dark or grisly as preceding novels—so if you've been wanting to introduce someone to the world of DI Rebus, you could start with this book. Strongly recommended for all public libraries and most academic libraries. [See Prepub Alert, LJ12/06.]
—Amy Watts Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Kirkus Reviews
DI John Rebus takes on the establishment, terrorists, headline tragedies and the aftermath of his brother's death. When political nabobs from global hot spots descend on Edinburgh for a well-publicized conference, John Rebus is sent packing. An iconoclastic police officer is not needed to guard the dignitaries, thanks very much. But when Labour MP Ben Webster, right-hand man to the Minister of International Development, falls to his death from the castle battlements on the eve of the conference, Rebus is called to look into the matter. Commander Steelforth, in charge of G8 security, tries to stifle him, insisting that Webster's death was a suicide, but Rebus disagrees. In untangling the matter, he lands smack in the bailiwick of his nemesis, Big Ger Cafferty. Wily though Cafferty may be, Rebus outplays him. Sadly, DS Siobhan Clarke is less wary, and in exchange for information about goings-on at Clootie Well that tie into other sordid murders, she puts herself in Cafferty's debt. Rebus must fend off important industrialists and banquet tables full of politicos (including Councillor Gareth Tench, who's keen to keep certain secrets hidden, and himself alive). And he must deal with them while terrorists are bombing the London underground stations and bus lines. The world would be better off if Rebus (Fleshmarket Alley, 2005, etc.) attended the peace summits instead of getting bogged down with the usual posturing officeholders and violent anarchists.
Patrick Anderson
The fifty-something Rebus is surely one of the most rounded, warts-and-all characters in modern crime fiction. . . . Those who want to plunge deep into a world of convincing characters and brilliantly rendered atmospherics can't do much better than this.
Washington Post
Clive James
For Rankin's fans all over the world, Rebus is the ideal sleuth.
The New Yorker
Harlan Coben
"There is a reason this guy is a #1 bestseller all over the world. Pick up The Naming of the Dead, read the first few pages, and then thank me later."
Lee Child
"The best living British crime writer."
Patrick Anderson - Washington Post
"The fifty-something Rebus is surely one of the most rounded, warts-and-all characters in modern crime fiction. . . . Those who want to plunge deep into a world of convincing characters and brilliantly rendered atmospherics can't do much better than this."
Clive James - The New Yorker
"For Rankin's fans all over the world, Rebus is the ideal sleuth."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316057578
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 4/2/2007
  • Series: Inspector John Rebus Series , #16
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Ian Rankin

Ian Rankin is a #1 international bestselling author. Winner of an Edgar Award and the recipient of a Gold Dagger for fiction and the Chandler-Fulbright Award, he lives in Edinburgh, Scotland, with his wife and their two sons.

Biography

"I grew up in a small coal-mining town in central Scotland. I was always interested in stories. Even though the town had no book stores (and my parents were not great readers), I made full use of the local library. It was mind-boggling to me that (at the age of 11 or 12) I could not gain access to a movie theatre to see such classics as The Godfather, A Clockwork Orange, or Straw Dogs, yet no one stopped me from borrowing these titles from my library. Books seemed to have about them a whiff of the illicit and the dangerous. That was all the encouragement I needed. I went to university in 1978, joined a punk band (on vocals), and continued to write a lot of song lyrics and poems. However, I found that my poems were actually 'telling stories', and so started to write short stories.

A few of these found publication and even won some awards. Then one story raged out of control and became my first novel. It was never published, but that didn't matter: I was now a novelist. I stumbled on Detective Inspector John Rebus by accident while attempting to write an update of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde: Rebus would be my Jekyll, his Hyde a character from his past. Along the way, I discovered that a cop is a good 'tool,' a way of looking at contemporary society, its rights and wrongs. Rebus, I decided, would stick around. Meantime, I finished unviersity, moved to London for four years (where I worked first as a college secretary, later as a hi-fi/audio journalist), then rural France for six years. Both my sons were born in France. By the time the oldest had reached school age, we'd decided to move back to Scotland. I now live and work in Edinburgh, and the Rebus novels have gone from strength to strength in terms of sales and recognition."

Author biography courtesy of Little, Brown & Company

Good To Know

Before making it as an author Rankin held a wide variety of gigs, including working in a chicken factory, as a swineherd, a grape-picker, and a tax collector. He even performed as the frontman of the short-lived punk band, The Dancing Pigs.

He has broken Irvine Welsh and Iain Banks's records, with six titles in the Scottish top 10 bestseller list simultaneously.

His favorite/inspirational books include pretty much anything by James Ellroy, Ruth Rendell, and Raymond Chandler—plus classics of Scottish Literature such as Robert Louis Strevenson's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, James Hogg's Confessions of a Justified Sinner, and Muriel Spark's The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. Other "desert island" titles include Martin Amis's Money, Anthony Burgess's Earthly Powers, Anthony Powell's A Dance to the Music of Time and Ian McEwan's First Love, Last Rites.

His favorite web site is http://www.oxfordbar.com — the official web site of Rebus's favourite Edinburgh tavern!

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    1. Also Known As:
      Jack Harvey
    2. Hometown:
      Edinburgh, London and France
    1. Date of Birth:
      April 28, 1960
    2. Place of Birth:
      Cardenden, Scotland
    1. Education:
      Edinburgh University
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

The Naming of the Dead


By Ian Rankin

Little, Brown and Company

Copyright © 2006 John Rebus Limited
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-316-05757-8


Chapter One

In place of a closing hymn, there was music. The Who, "Love Reign o'er Me." Rebus recognized it the moment it started, thunderclaps and teeming rain filling the chapel. He was in the front pew; Chrissie had insisted. He'd rather have been further back: his usual place at funerals. Chrissie's son and daughter sat next to her. Lesley was comforting her mother, an arm around her as the tears fell. Kenny stared straight ahead, storing up emotion for later. Earlier that morning, back at the house, Rebus had asked him his age. He would be thirty next month. Lesley was two years younger. Brother and sister looked like their mother, reminding Rebus that people had said the same about Michael and him: the pair of you, the spitting image of your mum. Michael ... Mickey, if you preferred. Rebus's younger brother, dead in a shiny-handled box at the age of fifty-four, Scotland's mortality rate that of a third world nation. Lifestyle, diet, genes-plenty of theories. The full postmortem hadn't come through yet. Massive stroke was what Chrissie had told Rebus on the phone, assuring him that it was "sudden"-as if that made a difference.

Sudden meant Rebus hadn't been able to say good-bye. It meant his last words to Michael had been a joke about his beloved Raith Rovers soccer team ina phone call three months back. A Raith scarf, navy and white, had been draped over the coffin alongside the wreaths. Kenny was wearing a tie that had been his dad's, Raith's shield on it-some kind of animal holding a belt buckle. Rebus had asked the significance, but Kenny had just shrugged. Looking along the pew, Rebus saw the usher make a gesture. Everyone rose to their feet. Chrissie started walking up the aisle, flanked by her children. The usher looked to Rebus, but he stayed where he was. Sat down again so the others would know they didn't have to wait for him. The song was only a little more than halfway through. It was the closing track on Quadrophenia. Michael had been the big Who fan, Rebus himself preferring the Stones. Had to admit, though, albums like Tommy and Quadrophenia did things the Stones never could. Daltrey was whooping now that he could use a drink. Rebus had to agree, but there was the drive back to Edinburgh to consider. The function room of a local hotel had been booked. All were welcome, as the minister had reminded them from the pulpit. Whiskey and tea would be poured, sandwiches served. There would be anecdotes and reminiscences, smiles, dabs at the eyes, hushed tones. The staff would move quietly, out of respect. Rebus was trying to form sentences in his head, words that would act as his apology.

I need to get back, Chrissie. Pressure of work.

He could lie and blame the G8. That morning in the house, Lesley had said he must be busy with the buildup. He could have told her, I'm the only cop they don't seem to need. Officers were being drafted in from all over. Fifteen hundred were coming from London alone. Yet Detective Inspector John Rebus seemed surplus to requirements. Someone had to man the ship-the very words DCI James Macrae had used, with his acolyte smirking by his shoulder. DI Derek Starr reckoned himself the heir apparent to Macrae's throne. One day, he'd be running Gayfield Square police station. John Rebus posed no threat whatsoever, not much more than a year away from retirement. Starr himself had said as much: Nobody'd blame you for coasting, John. It's what anyone your age would do. Maybe so, but the Stones were older than Rebus; Daltrey and Townshend were older than him too. Still playing, still touring. The song was ending now, and Rebus rose to his feet again. He was alone in the chapel. Took a final look at the purple velvet screen. Maybe the coffin was still behind it; maybe it had already been moved to another part of the crematorium. He thought back to adolescence, two brothers in their shared bedroom, playing 45s bought down Kirkcaldy High Street. "My Generation" and "Substitute," Mickey asking about Daltrey's stutter on the former, Rebus saying he'd read somewhere that it had to do with drugs. The only drug the brothers had indulged in was alcohol, mouthfuls stolen from the bottles in the pantry, a can of sickly stout broken open and shared after lights-out. Standing on Kirkcaldy promenade, staring out to sea, and Mickey singing the words to "I Can See for Miles." But could that really have happened? The record came out in '66 or '67, by which time Rebus was in the army. Must have been on a trip back. Yes, Mickey with his shoulder-length hair, trying to copy Daltrey's look, and Rebus with his military crew cut, inventing stories to make army life seem exciting, Northern Ireland still ahead of him ...

They'd been close back then, Rebus always sending letters and postcards, his father proud of him, proud of both the boys.

The spitting image of your mum.

He stepped outside. The cigarette packet was already open in his hand. There were other smokers around him. They offered nods, shuffling their feet. The various wreaths and cards had been lined up next to the door and were being studied by the mourners. The usual words would crop up: condolence and loss and sorrow. The family would be in our thoughts. Michael wouldn't be mentioned by name. Death brought its own set of protocols. The younger mourners were checking for text messages on their phones. Rebus dug his own out of his pocket and switched it on. Five missed calls, all from the same number. Rebus knew it from memory, pushed the buttons, and raised the phone to his ear. Detective Sergeant Siobhan Clarke was quick to answer.

"I've been trying you all morning," she complained.

"I had it switched off."

"Where are you anyway?"

"Still in Kirkcaldy."

There was an intake of breath. "Hell, John, I completely forgot."

"Don't worry about it." He watched Kenny open the car door for Chrissie. Lesley was motioning to Rebus, letting him know they were headed for the hotel. The car was a BMW, Kenny doing all right for himself as a mechanical engineer. He wasn't married; had a girlfriend, but she hadn't been able to make it to the funeral. Lesley was divorced, her own son and daughter off on holiday with their dad. Rebus nodded at her as she got into the back of the car.

"I thought it was next week," Siobhan was saying.

"I take it you're phoning for a gloat?" Rebus started walking toward his Saab. Siobhan had been in Perthshire the past two days, accompanying Macrae on a recon of G8 security. Macrae was old pals with Tayside's assistant chief constable. All Macrae wanted was a look around, his friend happy to oblige. The G8 leaders would meet at Gleneagles Hotel, on the outskirts of Auchterarder, nothing around them but acres of wilderness and miles of security fence. There had been plenty of scare stories in the media. Reports of three thousand U.S. Marines landing in Scotland to protect their president. Anarchist plots to block roads and bridges with hijacked trucks. Bob Geldof had demanded that a million demonstrators besiege Edinburgh. They would be housed, he said, in people's spare rooms, garages, and gardens. Boats would be sent to France to pick up protesters. Groups with names like Ya Basta and the Black Bloc would aim for chaos, while the People's Golfing Association wanted to break the cordon to play a few holes of Gleneagles's renowned course.

"I'm spending two days with DCI Macrae," Siobhan was saying. "What's to gloat about?"

Rebus unlocked his car and leaned in to slide the key into the ignition. He straightened again, took a last drag on his cigarette, and flicked the butt onto the roadway. Siobhan was saying something about a Scene of Crime team.

"Hold on," Rebus told her. "I didn't catch that."

"Look, you've got enough on your plate without this."

"Without what?"

"Remember Cyril Colliar?"

"Despite my advancing years, the memory's not quite packed in."

"Something really strange has happened."

"What?"

"I think I've found the missing piece."

"Of what?"

"The jacket."

Rebus found that he'd lowered himself onto the driver's seat. "I don't understand."

Siobhan gave a nervous laugh. "Me neither."

"So where are you now?"

"Auchterarder."

"And that's where the jacket's turned up?"

"Sort of."

Rebus swung his legs into the car and pulled the door shut. "Then I'm coming to take a look. Is Macrae with you?"

"He went to Glenrothes. That's where the G8 control center is." She paused. "Are you sure you should be doing this?"

Rebus had started the engine. "I need to make my apologies first, but I can be there inside the hour. Will I have any trouble getting into Auchterarder?"

"It's the calm before the storm. When you're driving through town, look for the sign to the Clootie Well."

"The what?"

"Easier if you just come and see for yourself."

"Then that's what I'll do. Scene of Crime on their way?"

"Yes."

"Which means word will get around."

"Should I tell the DCI?"

"I'll let you decide." Rebus had wedged the phone between his shoulder and his cheek so he could steer the maze-like course to the

gates of the crematorium.

"You're breaking up," Siobhan said.

Not if I can help it, Rebus thought to himself.

Cyril Colliar had been murdered six weeks before. Age twenty, he'd been locked away on a fixed ten-year stretch for a vicious rape. At the end of the sentence, he'd been released, despite the reservations of prison warders, police, and social services. They figured he was as big a threat as ever, having shown no remorse, denying his guilt despite DNA evidence. Colliar had returned to his native Edinburgh. All the bodybuilding he'd done in prison paid off. He worked as a nighttime bouncer and daytime muscle. His employer on both counts was Morris Gerald Cafferty. Big Ger was a villain of long standing. In had been Rebus's job to confront him about his latest employee.

"What do I care?" had been the retort.

"He's dangerous."

"Way you're hassling him would try the patience of a saint." Cafferty swinging from side to side on his leather swivel chair, behind his desk at MGC Lettings. Anyone was slow with the weekly rent on one of Cafferty's flats, Rebus guessed that was where Colliar would take over. Cafferty owned minicabs, too, and at least three raucous bars in the less salubrious parts of town. Plenty of work for Cyril Colliar.

Right up until the night he'd turned up dead. Skull caved in, the blow coming from behind. Pathologist figured he'd have died from that alone, but just to make sure, someone had added a syringe of very pure heroin. No indication that the deceased had been a user. Deceased was the word most of the cops on the case had used-and grudgingly at that. Nobody bothered with the term victim. Nobody could say the words out loud-Bastard got what he deserved-that wasn't the done thing these days.

Didn't stop them from thinking it, sharing it through eye contact and slow nods. Rebus and Siobhan had worked the case, but it had been one among many. Few leads and too many suspects. The rape victim had been interviewed, along with her family and her boyfriend from the time. One word kept coming up in discussing Colliar's fate: "Good."

His body had been found near his car, down a side street next to the bar where he'd been working. No witnesses, no scene-of-crime evidence. Just the one curiosity: a sharp blade had been used to slice away part of his distinctive jacket, a black nylon bomber emblazoned with the phrase CC Rider on the back. This was what had been removed, so that the white inner lining was revealed. Theories were in short supply. It was either a clumsy attempt to disguise the deceased's identity, or there had been something hidden in the lining. Tests had proved negative for traces of drugs, leaving the police to shrug and scratch their heads.

To Rebus, it looked like a hit. Either Colliar had made an enemy, or a message was being sent to Cafferty. Not that their several interviews with Colliar's employer had been enlightening.

"Bad for my reputation" was Cafferty's main reaction. "Means either you catch whoever did it ..."

"Or?"

But Cafferty hadn't needed to answer. And if Cafferty got to the culprit first, it would be the last that was ever heard of them.

None of which had helped. The inquiry had hit a wall around the same time G8 preparations started focusing minds-most of them driven by images of overtime pay-elsewhere. Other cases had intruded, too, with victims-real victims. The Colliar murder team had been wound down.

Rebus lowered his driver's-side window, welcoming the cool breeze. He didn't know the quickest route to Auchterarder; he knew Gleneagles could be reached from Kinross, so had headed that way. A couple of months back, he'd bought a GPS for the car, but he hadn't got round to reading the instructions yet. It lay on the passenger seat, screen blank. One of these days he'd take it to the garage that installed the car's CD player. An inspection of the backseat, floors, and trunk had failed to turn up anything by The Who, so Rebus was listening to Elbow instead-Siobhan's recommendation. He liked the title track, "Leaders of the Free World." Stuck it on repeat. The singer seemed to think something had gone wrong since the '60s. Rebus tended to agree, even coming at it from a different direction. He guessed the singer would have liked more change, a world run by Greenpeace and the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, poverty made history. Rebus had been on a few marches himself in the '60s, before and after joining the army. It was a way to meet girls if nothing else. Usually there was a party somewhere afterward. These days, though, he saw the '60s as the end of something. A fan had been stabbed to death at a Stones concert in 1969, and the decade had petered out. The 1960s had given youth a taste for revolt. They didn't trust the old order, certainly didn't respect it. He wondered about the thousands who would descend on Gleneagles, confrontation a certainty. Hard to imagine it in this landscape of farms and hillsides, rivers and glens. He knew that Gleneagles's very isolation would have been a factor in its choice as venue. The leaders of the free world would be safe there, safe to sign their names to decisions that had already been made elsewhere. On the stereo, the band was singing about climbing a landslide. The image stuck with Rebus all the way to the outskirts of Auchterarder.

He didn't think he'd been there before. All the same, he seemed to know the place. Typical small Scottish town: a single, well-defined main street with narrow side roads leading off, built with the notion that people would walk to their local shops. Small, independently owned shops at that; he didn't see much that would inflame the antiglobalization campaigners. The baker was even selling limited-edition G8 pies.

The good folk of Auchterarder, Rebus seemed to recall, had been vetted under the guise of providing them with ID badges. These would be necessary so they could cross the eventual barricades. Yet as Siobhan had pointed out, there was an eerie tranquillity to the place. Only a few shoppers and one carpenter who seemed to be measuring windows for protective boards. The cars were muddy 4x4s, which had probably spent more time on farm tracks than motorways. One woman driver was even wearing a head scarf, something Rebus hadn't seen in a while. Within a couple of minutes, he was at the far end of town and heading toward the A9. He did a three-point turn and this time kept his eyes open for signposts. The one he wanted was next to a pub, pointing down a lane. He signaled, following the road past hedges and driveways, then a newer housing estate. The landscape opened before him, showing distant hills. In moments he was out of town again, flanked by neat hedgerows that would leave their mark on his car if he had to make way for a tractor or delivery van. There were some woods to his left, and another sign told him this was home to the Clootie Well. He knew the word from clootie dumpling, a sticky steamed dessert his mother had sometimes made. He remembered the taste and texture as being similar to Christmas pudding, dark and cloying and sugary. His stomach gave a small protest, reminding him that he hadn't eaten in hours. His stop at the hotel had been brief, a few quiet words with Chrissie. She'd hugged him, just as she had back at the house earlier that morning. All the years he'd known her, there hadn't been many hugs. In the early days, he'd actually fancied her; awkward under the circumstances. She'd seemed to sense this. Then he'd been best man at the wedding, and, during one dance, she'd blown mischievously in his ear. Later, on the few occasions when she and Mickey had been separated, Rebus had taken his brother's side. He supposed he could have called her, said something, but he hadn't. And when Mickey had gotten into that spot of bother, ended up in jail, Rebus hadn't visited Chrissie and the kids. Mind you, he hadn't visited Mickey that often either, in jail or since.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from The Naming of the Dead by Ian Rankin Copyright © 2006 by John Rebus Limited . Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 29, 2009

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    A reviewer

    Scottish Terriers are known hunters, so it is apt that the detectives here are Scottish. I picked this book up because of its Edinburgh setting and wasn't disappointed as many tourist haunts play into the story. The story unfolds slowly and at a relaxing pace, but the mystery keeps the pages turning as Rankin plays his card so cleverly. Our detective Rebus isn't exactly superman, or a super cop, just another Scottish drinker who can't seem to let the darker forces get a leg up. Determining who those forces are is a good deal of the book's work. One thing Rankin did get wrong in the book: the name of President Bush's dog. It's Barney, yet another Scottish Terrier.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 27, 2011

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    Kept my interest with no boring plot.

    Mmy neighbor gave this book to read. Unfortunately, he forgot to tell me that this book was part of a series and that it was best that I read the earlier novels by Ian Rankin. Still, I struggled through "The Naming of the Dead" and finished it six days later. If you are a fan of this author and have read the series you probably are thrilled with the character Detective Inspector John Rebus, but coming in cold with this character I found myself trying to comprehend exactly who he was. One thing, I never found him to be boring and the plot kept my interest. I was hoping for an exciting mystery to unfold and by mid point in the story it did.

    The author's writing is style flows easily and he has a knack for describing in detail the scenes, police procedures, crime scenes and the traits of the characters. Overall, in my opinion this is a wonderful mystery novel, even though it is clouded by coming in late to the series. I'll definitely try another novel by Mr. Rankin that revolves around the Rebus character.

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  • Posted October 18, 2009

    Always Enjoy Inspector Rebus

    This is another book in the Inspector Rebus series. Ian Rankin can tell a good story with unexpected twists along the way...just to keep you off balance. He is wonderful with character development and making the Scottish background come alive on the page.

    If you like Rankin, you'll like this book.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

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    great police procedural

    In 2005 as the world awaits the Group of Eight summit in Edinburgh in a few days, Scottish law enforcement is in overdrive to protect world leaders and to insure the city and country are not embarrassed as the G8 meetings can have some active protestors. Two days before the session begins, security is already tight when Scottish delegate Ben Webster is found dead leading to an already wary police questioning whether he was murdered, but keeping the attendees safe is the prime objective so a thorough investigation will be delayed.----------------- Meanwhile Inspector John Rebus investigates the murder of violent sex offender Cyril Colliar, just freed from prison over the objection of his superiors who cannot spare a cop for the homicide of a nasty mob muscle. However, Rebus refuses to ignore the murder and his inquiries connect to Webster's death. While Colliar¿s boss crime kingpin Cafferty watches Rebus as he has danced with the Inspector before, the sleuth believes a vigilante is on a BLOOD HUNT meting out justice by killing rapists.---------------------------- Rebus is at his obstinate flaunting supervision best as he investigates the murder of a person he agrees with the vigilante deserved death to the backdrop of the 2005 G8 summit in Edinburgh. The fast-paced story line contains two fine subplots. The conference and its impact on the city and the services especially police provided by the city and country is a classic maniacal freak show Rebus¿ sole act investigation into the mob enforcer¿s homicide is cleverly done. However these themes and their link, Webster¿s death, never clearly tie together except for time and place. Still fans of Rebus will enjoy his latest police procedural as he is in full form causing havoc for the preoccupied brass.------------------- Harriet Klausner

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