Nancy Caroline's Emergency Care In The Streets / Edition 6

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Overview

Think back to a time when paramedics didn’t exist. When “drivers” simply brought injured patients to the hospital. When the EMS industry was in its infancy. A time before Nancy Caroline.

Dr. Caroline’s work transformed EMS and the entire paramedic field. She created the first national standard curriculum for paramedic training in the United States. She also wrote the first paramedic textbook: Emergency Care in the Streets.

The impact that Dr. Caroline had on EMS and health care spanned across the U.S. and abroad. From establishing EMS systems to training paramedics, to providing better nourishment and health care for orphans, her work had a profound impact on humanity. Throughout her life, Dr. Caroline brought a sense of excitement, joy, and humor to her work.

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is proud to continue Dr. Caroline’s legacy. Her sense of excitement and humor live on in this text, which is dedicated to her.

The Sixth Edition honors Dr. Caroline’s work with a clear, fun, understandable writing style for which she was known.

Welcome back a familiar training companion to your classroom! Say hello to Sidney Sinus, AV Abe, and a cast of memorable characters and amusing anecdotes. Make learning for your students more fun!

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763781729
  • Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning
  • Publication date: 2/5/2010
  • Edition description: 6E
  • Edition number: 6
  • Pages: 1800
  • Sales rank: 1,332,870
  • Product dimensions: 9.40 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 2.40 (d)

Meet the Author

SHAWN SMITH is an attorney, corporate executive, and founder of Next Level Consulting. Her articles have appeared in numerous legal and business publications.

REBECCA MAZIN is cofounder of Recruit Right, an HR consulting firm, and has held key positions at Hyatt Hotels, Owens Corning, and the National Labor Relations Board.

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Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

Employee Selection: How Do I Find, Attract, and Select the Best?

Hiring is a basic need for any employer that has at least one employee who is not a partner or family member.This is where the employment relationship begins. Policies and procedures for employee selection will set the tone for the interactions that follow throughout an individual’s time with the organization.

Hiring someone is easy.Hiring the best candidate isn’t always as simple a and it will require planning and a logical process.Whether you have one job opening or one hundred, the process and procedures you use for employee selection will be directly reflected in the results you achieve.

FINDING YOUR CANDIDATES

“Isn’t it as easy as posting the job on the Web?”

Web-based job postings are an important part of an effective recruitment strategy, but not the first step.Technology and the exponential rise in the use of online social networking have dramatically expanded the sources and methods for identifying candidates, but jumping right in without planning and preparation can bog down the process.

Some Preliminary Steps

Before identifying the best recruiting sources, you must clearly identify the parameters of the job.While a complete job description is helpful a it may not be available and does not always include all the information you need. Answering the following questions will help you define the job parameters. If you are the hiring manager, you will probably have the answers to these questions already or you know where to get them.

If you are not the hiring manager, then the hiring manager is a good starting point.

• What is the job title and who does the job report to? In your company, a particular job title or level may have certain benefits or perks attached to it. Does your company allow flexibility or creativity with job titles? One candidate may only accept a job with a “director”

title, while another may be satisfied with a lesser title if you add the word “senior.” Employers often add words like “senior” or “junior”

with the intention of upgrading an individual or adding an entrylevel spot in a department. Use care in creating these new titles.

While the title of “senior sales associate” will add status, a title such as “junior sales associate” can be a detriment.Think of the customers or other employees who will interact with this person. Does dealing with a “junior” inspire confidence? Creative titles are terrific as long as they are appropriate for your culture both internally and externally.“

Brand Champion” might have a nice ring, but may not translate into an understandable role in every business-to-business situation.

Speak to the person to whom the job reports to determine this individual’s needs and expectations. In a larger department, the position may report to a level below the hiring manager. In this situation a you should speak with both persons.

• When does the position have to be filled, and how much does it pay?

A manager may demand a quick hire. Before you rush to offer the job to the first available candidate, remember that the cost of hiring the wrong person is potentially higher than leaving the position vacant.

The wrong person can make expensive mistakes or cause dissatisfac-tion and turnover among other employees. Set realistic hiring timelines that also take into account the availability of necessary resources such as space, equipment, training, and supervision.

If you are filling an existing position, find out what the pay range has been in the past. If it is a new position, ensure that the pay rate is appropriate. If your company paid sign-on bonuses, relocation expenses, or other incentives or special benefits in the past a determine if they are available for this position and, if so, how much money is available. Extra perks are far less common when candidates are plentiful but may be necessary in industries or environments where skills shortages exist.

• Who needs to meet or interview this person, and who will make the job offer? Identify everyone who needs to be part of the hiring decision and determine their general availability to conduct interviews.Also a think about people who will be helpful in attracting candidates.

These people may include employees from a promising candidate’s hometown or alma mater, as well as those with exceptional personalities who might be effective salespeople for the organization.

It is often helpful to obtain many different perspectives on an applicant, from both prospective superiors and peers. Consider having an employee who is at the same job level as the open position either conduct an interview, give a tour of the facility, or take a coffee break with candidates. Not only is employee involvement in the selection process good for morale, it will provide valuable feedback—

and a peer can help to “sell” the company.

The job offer should be made by the person with the authority to make decisions and respond to demands.This can be the hiring manager, a senior manager or executive, a member of the HR

staff, or a search firm, if one is used.

Worth Repeating: Tour Guide Obtains References

For a mid-management position in a service industry, a strong performer

met the candidate as part of a tour. The manager identified all

they had in common, including people they both knew and had

worked for. These names became the first references to be called.
• What are the skills/education needed for this position? What is the work experience required for this position? Create a list of the core skills, edu-cation, and experience needed to get the job done.You can add additional skills and experience that would be helpful and designate these elements as optional for successful performance of the job.

• Was someone promoted or fired? Where did the last person come from?

If the vacancy was created by a promotion, gather information about the position from the person who last held the job. Check with the hiring manager to ensure that the job content is not changing. If the vacancy was created because someone was fired, find out if the termina-tion was due to poor job performance or a lack of specific knowledge or skills.

If the last person in the job had been hired within the past year a check for a file of resumes of other candidates who applied for the position. Find out whether the person came from a search firm,

Internet posting, networking, or other source, then make it a priority to return to this source if it had previously generated strong candidates.

Maintaining applicant flow logs in a spreadsheet or database will facilitate the process, particularly when resumes are filed electronic-ally. A sample format can be found in the Tools and Templates section of this book.

Better Forgotten: Great Post, Wrong E-Mail Address

A start-up in a major city placed a job posting on a site focused on the

town and industry. The posting included an e-mail address to send

resumes and responses to. The e-mail address was incorrect and

responses went into cyberspace. Candidates were lost and frustrated.

Double-check any information included in an employment posting.

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Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Preface ix

1 Employee Selection: How Do I Find, Attract, and Select the Best? 1

2 HR Policies: Why Do We Need Them and What Should They Look Like? 35

3 Performance Management: How Do I Evaluate Performance and Conduct Meaningful Performance Reviews? 49

4 Employee Relations and Retention: How Do I Keep Good Employees and Maintain Working Relationships at All Levels? 71

5 Compensation: How Should Employees Be Paid? 97

6 Benefits: What Makes a Benefits Package Competitive? 121

7 Regulatory Issues: What Are the Major Employment Laws and How Do I Comply with Them? 153

8 When Bad Things Happen to Good Employers: How Do I Handle Volatile Workplace Issues? 185

9 Termination and Discharge: How Do I Fire an Employee Legally and Humanely? 213

10 Workforce Reorganizations: How Do I Manage Workforce Size in a Changing Business Climate? 231

Tools and Templates 249

Index 269

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First Chapter

The HR Answer Book

An Indispensable Guide for Managers and Human Resources Professionals
By Shawn Smith Rebecca Mazin

AMACOM

Copyright © 2011 Shawn Smith and Rebecca Mazin
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-8144-1717-1


Chapter One

Employee Selection

How Do I Find, Attract, and Select the Best?

HIRING IS A BASIC NEED for any employer that has at least one employee who is not a partner or family member. This is where the employment relationship begins. Policies and procedures for employee selection will set the tone for the interactions that follow throughout an individual's time with the organization.

Hiring someone is easy. Hiring the best candidate isn't always as simple, and it will require planning and a logical process. Whether you have one job opening or one hundred, the process and procedures you use for employee selection will be directly reflected in the results you achieve.

FINDING YOUR CANDIDATES

"Isn't it as easy as posting the job on the Web?"

Web-based job postings are an important part of an effective recruitment strategy, but not the first step. Technology and the exponential rise in the use of online social networking have dramatically expanded the sources and methods for identifying candidates, but jumping right in without planning and preparation can bog down the process.

Some Preliminary Steps

Before identifying the best recruiting sources, you must clearly identify the parameters of the job. While a complete job description is helpful, it may not be available and does not always include all the information you need. Answering the following questions will help you define the job parameters. If you are the hiring manager, you will probably have the answers to these questions already or you know where to get them. If you are not the hiring manager, then the hiring manager is a good starting point.

• What is the job title and who does the job report to? In your company, a particular job title or level may have certain benefits or perks attached to it. Does your company allow flexibility or creativity with job titles? One candidate may only accept a job with a "director" title, while another may be satisfied with a lesser title if you add the word "senior." Employers often add words like "senior" or "junior" with the intention of upgrading an individual or adding an entry-level spot in a department. Use care in creating these new titles. While the title of "senior sales associate" will add status, a title such as "junior sales associate" can be a detriment. Think of the customers or other employees who will interact with this person. Does dealing with a "junior" inspire confidence? Creative titles are terrific as long as they are appropriate for your culture both internally and externally. "Brand Champion" might have a nice ring, but may not translate into an understandable role in every business-to-business situation.

Speak to the person to whom the job reports to determine this individual's needs and expectations. In a larger department, the position may report to a level below the hiring manager. In this situation, you should speak with both persons.

• When does the position have to be filled, and how much does it pay? A manager may demand a quick hire. Before you rush to offer the job to the first available candidate, remember that the cost of hiring the wrong person is potentially higher than leaving the position vacant. The wrong person can make expensive mistakes or cause dissatisfaction and turnover among other employees. Set realistic hiring timelines that also take into account the availability of necessary resources such as space, equipment, training, and supervision.

If you are filling an existing position, find out what the pay range has been in the past. If it is a new position, ensure that the pay rate is appropriate. If your company paid sign-on bonuses, relocation expenses, or other incentives or special benefits in the past, determine if they are available for this position and, if so, how much money is available. Extra perks are far less common when candidates are plentiful but may be necessary in industries or environments where skills shortages exist.

• Who needs to meet or interview this person, and who will make the job offer? Identify everyone who needs to be part of the hiring decision and determine their general availability to conduct interviews. Also, think about people who will be helpful in attracting candidates. These people may include employees from a promising candidate's hometown or alma mater, as well as those with exceptional personalities who might be effective salespeople for the organization.

It is often helpful to obtain many different perspectives on an applicant, from both prospective superiors and peers. Consider having an employee who is at the same job level as the open position either conduct an interview, give a tour of the facility, or take a coffee break with candidates. Not only is employee involvement in the selection process good for morale, it will provide valuable feedback—and a peer can help to "sell" the company.

The job offer should be made by the person with the authority to make decisions and respond to demands. This can be the hiring manager, a senior manager or executive, a member of the HR staff, or a search firm, if one is used.

• What are the skills/education needed for this position? What is the work experience required for this position? Create a list of the core skills, education, and experience needed to get the job done. You can add additional skills and experience that would be helpful and designate these elements as optional for successful performance of the job.

• Was someone promoted or fired? Where did the last person come from? If the vacancy was created by a promotion, gather information about the position from the person who last held the job. Check with the hiring manager to ensure that the job content is not changing. If the vacancy was created because someone was fired, find out if the termination was due to poor job performance or a lack of specific knowledge or skills.

If the last person in the job had been hired within the past year, check for a file of resumes of other candidates who applied for the position. Find out whether the person came from a search firm, Internet posting, networking, or other source, then make it a priority to return to this source if it had previously generated strong candidates. Maintaining applicant flow logs in a spreadsheet or database will facilitate the process, particularly when resumes are filed electronically. A sample format can be found in the Tools and Templates section of this book.

Internet Recruiting

"How do I make the most out of the Internet for recruiting?"

With more than ten thousand Web sites focused on recruitment and the prevalence of online social networking, the Internet has become a significant source for candidates for many employers. However, before you jump in to make your presence known on the Web, plan ahead. Internet resources can be a valuable part of your recruitment strategy, or they could take too much time without generating strong results.

The first step in Web-based recruitment is a review of your own company Web site. Online job seekers should find a site that is representative of the culture and environment of your workplace, provides good information about the organization, and is easy to navigate. Embedded videos of employees sharing career experiences can help create a picture of the company. Have a designated location, button, or tab where job openings are posted. Make sure it's visible on and accessible from your home page with a click on a button such as "Careers at XYZ Company."

To maximize the effectiveness of your employment Web page, include information about career paths, expectations of experience and education, and how to apply for open positions. If you consistently solicit resumes whether or not there are any immediate openings, put this information on your Web site. Be sure to keep the information up to date. Provide a direct link that allows candidates to apply online. Do not force potential applicants to take the extra step of printing an application or mailing or faxing a resume.

"Shouldn't I just post the opening on a large recruitment Web site?"

Posting your job on Monster or Careerbuilder may seem like a logical step, but sometimes the jumbo sites may be your least productive source of qualified job candidates.

If you are seeking a candidate in a highly competitive field where the number of job openings is far greater than the number of people in the workforce with the necessary skills, then many employers with similar needs will probably be posting jobs as well. The people who are successfully employed in a high-demand field are usually not spending time scrolling through job boards. In these circumstances, your posting is likely to generate either very few responses or responses from individuals who lack the necessary qualifications.

If the job opening is for a position with few requirements, or in a field that is overpopulated, you are likely to receive a very large response. A flood of resumes does not ensure the highest-quality candidates, and the larger the response, the more work you may need to do. If you feel it is important to generate a large candidate pool, make certain you are able to handle the applicants properly. A large candidate pool is useless if you cannot screen and respond to the resumes.

Effective use of recruitment sites requires research before you begin, preferably before a need occurs. An easy way to start your inquiry is to navigate one of the large popular sites. Recruitment sites feature separate sections for employers and job seekers. Gain an understanding of what types of jobs are posted—and how candidates get to view the postings—by searching for openings similar to yours in the job seekers' section. The employer section of the site will include information about costs for both posting and viewing resumes and may also provide facts about the candidate database or typical visitor.

Once you are familiar with the basic components of recruitment sites, begin researching sites that will best fit your needs. The annually updated Weddle's Guide to Employment Sites on the Internet includes a top 100 list with a full page of information on each and a listing of more than ten thousand sites identified as "The Best & the Rest" divided into helpful categories. Using this and other resources, you can identify sites that cater to your geographic location or industry specialty. Industry-specific sites can be as all-encompassing as www.dice.com, with more than seventy thousand technology jobs posted, or very specific, such as www.idealist.org, for nonprofits. Using a targeted site, whether it is local or industry/skill-specific, is likely to increase the number of quality responses. You can also find niche employment Web sites through a community search, area business groups such as the chamber of commerce, or local newspapers. Online versions of newspapers typically post all jobs that appear in their print editions and partner with the big job boards.

Internet posts typically cost approximately $200 to $400 per job listed. In this crowded industry, first-time user discounts and packages that include multiple postings will provide savings. A little checking can uncover less expensive options, including free and low-cost job boards managed by employer or industry associations and nearby schools. Craigslist, a popular free site with classifieds of all types, has grown to become a host for job opportunities throughout the world, with available openings listed by job category functions and geography. Craigslist jobs are predominantly entry-level, hourly, semiskilled, and skilled up to middle management.

"How do I write an online job posting?"

Follow these guidelines when you find the right site for your job posting:

  •   Write a creative job posting that reflects not only the position, but also the culture of your company.
  •   Job postings are more effective if they avoid repetition and use abbreviations and language that all readers can understand. Even though there is generally plenty of space, and you are not paying by the word, you still want to attract and hold the candidate's attention.
  •   Select the proper category that includes job or industry type. Research these factors by checking existing job postings. Don't combine two or more openings into one posting. This can make it impossible to categorize or find effectively.

If you fill the job or a posted position becomes inactive, remove the posting immediately. Don't frustrate potential applicants by posting jobs that are not available. Most sites have a feature allowing employers to view resumes in their databases, usually for an additional fee. Before paying to view resumes, determine the exact criteria used by the database so you'll know whether the resumes are current and contain the background, skills, geographic location, and salary requirements that match your search.

Larger companies that receive numerous resumes use computer software programs to receive, organize, and track submissions. The biggest general recruitment sites also offer services or programs that perform these functions. Check out offerings that allow small to mid-size companies the ability to take advantage of this technology at more attractive rates, available through a variety of vendors from software to payroll providers. One step to help sort a flood of resumes is to use a dedicated e-mail address, or multiple addresses by type of position, such as jobs@abcaudio.com or techjobs@abcaudio.com.

Consider using an advertising agency that specializes in recruitment advertising. These companies have transitioned from ad writers who earned their fees from newspapers to partners who can facilitate online postings and manage much of the process. These companies' services range from screening to providing virtual resume storage, employment branding, and candidate database management.

"How do I search social media sites to find potential employees?"

Job boards are not the only venues for online recruiting. The Internet has become a hotbed of virtual networking for job seekers and employers. With hundreds of millions of users interacting and sharing information online, employers now use social media to actively search for and connect with potential employees—sometimes as a first step before even turning to job sites. Social networking can take two forms: announcing your opening through different channels and seeking and identifying individual candidates.

"Isn't Facebook for party and vacation photos?"

The majority of Facebook users are not the teenagers and college students who initially flocked to the site. Facebook is still the home for hundreds of millions of photos of vacations, families, and friends, but increasingly it is an important venue for employers seeking to broaden their Web presence.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from The HR Answer Book by Shawn Smith Rebecca Mazin Copyright © 2011 by Shawn Smith and Rebecca Mazin. Excerpted by permission of AMACOM. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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