Nancy Drew and Her Sister Sleuths: Essays on the Fiction of Girl Detectives

Overview

This collection of essays focuses on the girl sleuth, made famous by Nancy Drew but also characterized by other famous detectives like Cherry Ames, Trixie Belden, Linda Carlton, and even in contemporary media by Veronica Mars and Hermione Granger of the Harry Potter series.

Topics include the disputed origins of Nancy Drew and the Stratemeyer Syndicate; the intertwined relationships between the Syndicate and Nancy Drew's many ghostwriters; the distinct and evolving textual ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (3) from $20.00   
  • New (1) from $30.50   
  • Used (2) from $20.00   
Sending request ...

Overview

This collection of essays focuses on the girl sleuth, made famous by Nancy Drew but also characterized by other famous detectives like Cherry Ames, Trixie Belden, Linda Carlton, and even in contemporary media by Veronica Mars and Hermione Granger of the Harry Potter series.

Topics include the disputed origins of Nancy Drew and the Stratemeyer Syndicate; the intertwined relationships between the Syndicate and Nancy Drew's many ghostwriters; the distinct and evolving textual identities of the Cherry Ames series; the adaptation of the traditional archetype by contemporary girl detectives like Veronica Mars, Lulu Dark, and Ingrid Levin-Hill; and the ways in which Harry Potter's Hermione Granger, while a central character in the series, is often at odds with the male-centric, fantasy-genre world of Harry Potter himself.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice
an excellent addition...recommended
School Library Journal
interesting...thought-provoking...a great choice
Feminist Collections
an absorbing read
School Library Journal

This collection of articles is an interesting and thought-provoking treatment of the cultural influences on the stories of girl detectives. The essays, most of them by university professors, include a brief history of the Stratemeyer Syndicate and the creation of Nancy Drew, first published in 1930, and an introduction to the two major authors of the Nancy Drew mysteries, Harriet Stratemeyer Adams and Mildred Wirt Benson. Both wrote under the name of Carolyn Keene and were involved in the corporate collaborative effort of the publisher, writers, and editors who produced books that were meant to entertain but were often questioned by librarians and teachers in terms of their literary value. Other selections examine the issues of race and xenophobia in the series and Nancy's lack of technological knowledge and ability in spite of her strength and intellect and the changing cultural influences on that dearth of knowledge. Other essays look at series about Linda Carlton, Cherry Ames, Trixie Belden, and teen sleuths such as Hermione Granger. A great choice for all who are interested in the evolution of the girl detective in American youth literature.-Rebecca Sheridan, Easttown Library & Information Center, Berwyn, PA

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786439959
  • Publisher: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/19/2008
  • Pages: 216
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael G. Cornelius is an award-winning novelist and the author or editor of numerous scholarly works. He is the chair of English and Communications at Wilson College in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Melanie E. Gregg is an associate professor of French at Wilson College in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Her research is focused primarily on French women writers of the Early Modern period and the twentieth century.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction The Mystery of the Moll Dick Michael G. Cornelius Cornelius, Michael G. 1

The Nancy Drew Mythtery Stories James D. Keeline Keeline, James D. 13

Originator, Writer, Editor, Hack: Carolyn Keene and Changing Definitions of Authorship Linda K. Karell Karell, Linda K. 33

Alice Roy, Detective: Nancy Drew in French Translation Melanie E. Gregg Gregg, Melanie E. 47

Race and Xenophobia in the Nancy Drew Novels: "What kind of society ...?" Leona W. Fisher Fisher, Leona W. 63

"They blinded her with science": Science Fiction and Technology in Nancy Drew Michael G. Cornelius Cornelius, Michael G. 77

Linda Carlton: Flying Sleuth/Sleuthing Flier Fred Erisman Erisman, Fred 96

The Girl Sleuths of Melody Lane H. Alan Pickrell Pickrell, H. Alan 109

Measuring Up to the Task: Cherry Ames as Nurse and Sleuth Anita G. Gorman Gorman, Anita G. Leslie Robertson Mateer Mateer, Leslie Robertson 124

Puzzles, Paternity, and Privilege: The Mysterious Function(s) of the Family in Trixie Belden Steven J. Zani Zani, Steven J. 140

Not Nancy Drew but Not Clueless: Embodying the Teen Girl Sleuth in the Twenty-first Century Marla Harris Harris, Marla 152

Hermione Granger as Girl Sleuth Glenna Andrade Andrade, Glenna 164

Teen Sleuth Manifesto Melissa Favara Favara, Melissa Allison Schuette-Hoffman Schuette-Hoffman, Allison 179

About the Contributors 199

Index 203

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)