Nanophysics and Nanotechnology: An Introduction to Modern Concepts in Nanoscience / Edition 2

Nanophysics and Nanotechnology: An Introduction to Modern Concepts in Nanoscience / Edition 2

by Edward L. Wolf
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 3527406514

ISBN-13: 9783527406517

Pub. Date: 10/20/2006

Publisher: Wiley

With the second edition of his highly successful textbook 'Nanophysics and Nanotechnology', the author has once more provided a unique, self-contained introduction to the physical concepts, techniques and applications of nanoscale systems by covering its entire spectrum from the latest examples right up to single-electron and molecular electronics. The book is

Overview

With the second edition of his highly successful textbook 'Nanophysics and Nanotechnology', the author has once more provided a unique, self-contained introduction to the physical concepts, techniques and applications of nanoscale systems by covering its entire spectrum from the latest examples right up to single-electron and molecular electronics. The book is basically at the level of an upper level undergraduate engineering or science student. New sections have been added on the use of DNA as an organizing stratagem in self-assembly, silicon nanowires, comments on the new success toward human cloning, the achievement of self-replication in a primitive set of electromechanical robots, recognition in the extra chapters of the acceleration toward alternative forms of nanoelectronics. Additional problems have also been provided.

• Free solutions manual available for lecturers at www.wiley-vch.de/supplements/

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9783527406517
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
10/20/2006
Series:
Physics Textbook Series
Edition description:
2nd, Updated and Enlarged Edition
Pages:
308
Product dimensions:
6.75(w) x 9.67(h) x 0.64(d)

Table of Contents

Preface.

1 Introduction.

1.1 Nanometers, Micrometers, Millimeters.

1.2 Moores Law.

1.3 Esakis Quantum Tunneling Diode.

1.4 Quantum Dots of Many Colors.

1.5 GMR 40Gb Hard Drive Read Heads.

1.6 Accelerometers in your Car.

1.7 Nanopore Filters.

1.8 Nanoscale Elements in Traditional Technologies.

2 Systematics of Making Things Smaller, Pre-quantum.

2.1 Mechanical Frequencies Increase in Small Systems.

2.2 Scaling Relations Illustrated by a Simple Harmonic Oscillator.

2.3 Scaling Relations Illustrated by Simple Circuit Elements.

2.4 Thermal Time Constants and Temperature Differences Decrease.

2.5 Viscous Forces Become Dominant for Small Particles in Fluid Media.

2.6 Frictional Forces can Disappear in Symmetric Molecular Scale Systems.

3 What are Limits to Smallness?

3.1 Particle (Quantum) Nature of Matter: Photons, Electrons, Atoms, Molecules.

3.2 Biological Examples of Nanomotors and Nanodevices.

3.2.1 Linear Spring Motors.

3.2.2 Linear Engines on Tracks.

3.2.3 Rotary Motors.

3.2.4 Ion Channels, the Nanotransistors of Biology.

3.3 How Small can you Make it?

3.3.1 What are the Methods for Making Small Objects?

3.3.2 How Can you See What you Want to Make?

3.3.3 How Can you Connect it to the Outside World?

3.3.4 If you Cant See it or Connect to it, Can you Make it Self-assemble and Work on its Own?

3.3.5 Approaches to Assembly of Small Three-dimensional Objects.

4 Quantum Nature of the Nanoworld.

4.1 Bohrs Model of the Nuclear Atom.

4.1.1 Quantization of Angular Momentum.

4.1.2 Extensions of Bohrs Model.

4.2 Particle-wave Nature of Light and Matter, DeBroglie Formulas k= h/p, E = hv.

4.3 Wavefunction W for Electron, Probability Density W*W, Traveling and Standing Waves.

4.4 Maxwells Equations; E and B as Wavefunctions for Photons, Optical Fiber Modes.

4.5 The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle.

4.6 Schrodinger Equation, Quantum States and Energies, Barrier Tunneling.

4.6.1 Schrodinger Equations in one Dimension.

4.6.2 The Trapped Particle in one Dimension.

4.6.3 Reflection and Tunneling at a Potential Step.

4.6.4 Penetration of a Barrier.

4.6.5 Trapped Particles in Two and Three Dimensions: Quantum Dot.

4.6.6 2D Bands and Quantum Wires.

4.6.7 The Simple Harmonic Oscillator.

4.6.8 Schrodinger Equation in Spherical Polar Coordinates.

4.7 The Hydrogen Atom, One-electron Atoms, Excitons.

4.8 Fermions, Bosons and Occupation Rules.

5 Quantum Consequences for the Macroworld.

5.1 Chemical Table of the Elements.

5.2 Nano-symmetry, Di-atoms, and Ferromagnets.

5.2.1 Indistinguishable Particles, and their Exchange.

5.2.2 The Hydrogen Molecule, Di-hydrogen: The Covalent Bond.

5.3 More Purely Nanophysical Forces: van der Waals, Casimir, and Hydrogen Bonding.

5.3.1 The Polar and van der Waals Fluctuation Forces.

5.3.2 The Casimir Force.

5.3.3 The Hydrogen Bond.

5.4 Metals as Boxes of Free Electrons: Fermi Level, DOS, Dimensionality.

5.5 Periodic Structures (e.g. Si, GaAs, InSb, Cu): Kronig–Penney Model for Electron Bands and Gaps.

5.6 Electron Bands and Conduction in Semiconductors and Insulators 97

5.7 Hydrogenic Donors and Acceptors 102

5.8 More about Ferromagnetism, the Nanophysical Basis of Disk Memory 103

5.9 Surfaces are different, Schottky barrier thickness W = [2eeoVB/eND]1/2.

6 Self-assembled Nanostructures in Nature and Industry.

6.1 Carbon Atom 126C 1s2 2p4 (0.07 nm).

6.2 Methane CH4, Ethane C2H6, and Octane C8H18.

6.3 Ethylene C2H4, Benzene C6H6, and Acetylene C2H2.

6.4 C60 Buckyball ~0.5nm.

6.5 Cinfinity Nanotube ~0.5nm.

6.6 InAs Quantum Dot ~5nm.

6.7 AgBr Nanocrystal 0.1–2 mm.

6.8 Fe3O4 Magnetite and Fe3S4 Greigite Nanoparticles in Magnetotactic Bacteria.

6.9 Self-assembled Monolayers on Au and Other Smooth Surfaces.

7 Physics-based Experimental Approaches to Nanofabrication and Nanotechnology.

7.1 Silicon Technology: the INTEL-IBM Approach to Nanotechnology.

7.1.1 Patterning, Masks, and Photolithography.

7.1.2 Etching Silicon.

7.1.3 Defining Highly Conducting Electrode Regions.

7.1.4 Methods of Deposition of Metal and Insulating Films.

7.2 Lateral Resolution (Linewidths) Limited by Wavelength of Light, now 180nm.

7.2.1 Optical and x-ray Lithography.

7.2.2 Electron-beam Lithography.

7.3 Sacrificial Layers, Suspended Bridges, Single-electron Transistors.

7.4 What is the Future of Silicon Computer Technology?

7.5 Heat Dissipation and the RSFQ Technology.

7.6 Scanning Probe (Machine) Methods: One Atom at a Time.

7.7 Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) as Prototype Molecular Assembler.

7.7.1 Moving Au Atoms, Making Surface Molecules.

7.7.2 Assembling Organic Molecules with an STM.

7.8 Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) Arrays.

7.8.1 Cantilever Arrays by Photolithography.

7.8.2 Nanofabrication with an AFM.

7.9 Fundamental Questions: Rates, Accuracy and More.

8 Looking into the Future.

8.1 Drexlers Mechanical (Molecular) Axle and Bearing.

8.1.1 Smalleys Refutation of Machine Assembly.

8.1.2 Van der Waals Forces for Frictionless Bearings?

8.2 The Concept of the Molecular Assembler is Flawed.

8.3 Could Molecular Machines Revolutionize Technology or even Selfreplicate to Threaten Terrestrial Life?

8.4 What about Genetic Engineering and Robotics?

8.5 Is there a Posthuman Future as Envisioned by Fukuyama?

Exercises.

Index.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >