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Naoko
     

Naoko

4.5 2
by Keigo Higashino, Kerim Yasar (Translator)
 

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Winner of the Japan Mystery Writers Award, Naoko is a black comedy of hidden minds and lives. Navigating the interstices between the real and the unreal with perfect plot twists, this page-turner is also a critique of gender relations by a male Japanese writer, one of their best-sellng.

An everyman, Heisuke works hard at a factory job to provide for his

Overview

Winner of the Japan Mystery Writers Award, Naoko is a black comedy of hidden minds and lives. Navigating the interstices between the real and the unreal with perfect plot twists, this page-turner is also a critique of gender relations by a male Japanese writer, one of their best-sellng.

An everyman, Heisuke works hard at a factory job to provide for his wife, Naoko, and young daughter, Monami. He takes pleasure from the small things, like breakfast with both of them after a night shift. His placid life is rocked when, looking up from his microwave dinner one evening, he realizes the TV news that he wasn't paying attention to is reporting a catastrophic bus accident and the names of his loved ones.

When Monami finally wakes from a coma, she seems to think she's Naoko, who has died protecting her daughter. More disturbingly, the girl knows things only Naoko could know. The family life that resumes between the modest man and a companion who looks like his daughter bu seems like his dead wife is ticklish-funny until it begins hurtling toward a soul-shattering end.

In addition to winning Japan's top mystery prize, Naoko inspired a blockbuster movie. Read this work, a match for the later Bunuel, to find out why Higashino is considered the most ambitious and versatile mystery hand at work in Japan.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Winner of the Japan Mystery Writers Award

“Higashino is a deft conjurer of human relationships, and while this is first and foremost a tale of grief— thankfully, no one calls Naoko a story of redemption—he infuses it with spasms of sharp humor.” —East Bay Express

“The novel flips suddenly…in wonderfully pleasing fashion, from pathetic tragedy to social satire and domestic comedy with themes of love, work, sex and education. How could we have ever imagined, without the help of a novel like this, that Japanese life could be so fraught with suffering and so entertaining all at once?” —Alan Cheuse for the Dallas Morning News

"It's the realness of the characters ..that makes the fantastic story more believable and harder to put down." - Mecha Mecha Media Blogspot

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781932234077
Publisher:
Vertical, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/15/2004
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
478,164
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.93(d)
Age Range:
16 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Born in 1958, Keigo Higashino studied electrical engineering and worked as a salaryman until he wom the Edogawa Rampo Mystery Award in 1985. Originally a detective novelist, he has branched out to other genres, including science fiction. Naoko is his first work to appear in English.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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Naoko 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AP World History Review: Very intense and a really good story! I would most definately recommend this book. It is a very fast past book with a great plot. There is also a very good plot twist. The book revolves around an accident that happened while a mother and daughter were in a bus. This book goes in depth of what happens after the accident. The book gives a big glimpse on Japanese culture as well! It shows how life is for a teenager and for a normal person in Japan at that time. The author did a very good job at completing his purpose for this book. The basic plot is very intense and moving. The author was trying to turn a normal tragedy into an alternate world for Heisuke. Heisuke as to think about his daughter Monami and Naoko as one. Heisuke has to think about his daughter's future. It becomes very hard to break barriers between him and his daughter after the accident. I recommend you read this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Or is it vice versa? The process is painful as the process of losing a loved one spreads itself out over several years as opposed to one horrific day. This book is good read as it thoroughly takes the father/daughter/wife relationship to the extremes. It teases at a incestious Lolita-esque relationship, but never goes far enough to get uncomfortable.