Napí

Napí

by Antonio Ramirez, Domi
     
 


Napí is a young Mazateca girl who lives with her family in a village on the bank of a river in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. Each afternoon the family sits beneath the shade of a huge ceiba tree and listens to the grandfather's stories. As Napí listens, she imagines different colors — orange, purple, violet, and green. When night comes, the trees… See more details below

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Overview


Napí is a young Mazateca girl who lives with her family in a village on the bank of a river in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. Each afternoon the family sits beneath the shade of a huge ceiba tree and listens to the grandfather's stories. As Napí listens, she imagines different colors — orange, purple, violet, and green. When night comes, the trees fill with white herons settling on their branches. The ceiba tree sends Napí dreams every night, and in her favorite one, she becomes a heron, gliding freely along the river. Domi's vibrant palette and magical illustrations perfectly complement this imaginative story.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Napi invites us into her life on the riverbank in Oaxaca to listen to her grandfather's stories under the ceiba tree they call pachot, and to watch the colors of the day flow into the night. Then we join her in her dreams, as she becomes a heron flying over the river and the village. The story is rich with Napi's emotions vividly reflected on double pages of watery acrylic paintings. There is a sophisticated innocence about the illustrations that are reminiscent of some by Paul Klee, a way of totally filling the pages with areas of colors, symbols of plants and animals, buildings created with multicolored stripes, child-like representations of people, and moons with faces. The dream-like sequences are imbued with the spirit of a colorful culture, the Mazatecas, who may be poor but are rich in imagination. 2004, Groundwood Books/Douglas & McIntyre, Ages 5 to 8.
—Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-A Mazateca girl who lives beside a river in Oaxaca describes her home and village at different times of the day. The importance of nature in her people's lives is clear. When night comes, the pachota, a tree special to her, sends her dreams. In them, she is a heron flying over her village, observing the people and her beloved tree. Despite an abrupt ending, the clear, lyrical prose has a childlike charm that brilliantly re-creates the joys of this child's experience. Domi's primitive acrylic artwork enhances the sense of the story. The visual equivalent of magical realism with their detail and luminous layering of jewel tone colors, these enchanting paintings will draw children into Nap''s world. Right down to the flying girl with her braids outstretched, this title is reminiscent in tone and artistic distinction to Faith Ringgold's Tar Beach (Crown, 1991). It would also pair well with Tony Johnston's Isabel's House of Butterflies (Sierra Club, 2003) for an informed look at indigenous cultures.-Ann Welton, Grant Elementary School, Tacoma, WA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Outdoing even her work in Subcomandante Marcos's Story of Colors (2003) for symphonic plays of hue, Domi illustrates another fellow Zapatista's text with dazzling, stylized Oaxacan figures and scenes. In terse, wooden prose, a child introduces herself and her family-"We are Mazateca Indians. We are poor. . . . "-describes how the day's color changes make her feel, sees herons lighting in the trees at nightfall, and dreams of being a heron herself, flying "safe and happy" over her river and village. Defined in spots, bands, and splashes of bright acrylics in multiple layers that melt into each other, the houses, trees, and river seem to shimmer in tones of orange, purple, green, and deep blue on successive spreads, as Nap' listens to her grandfather's tales. They sit beneath the huge pachota tree, where her "bellybutton" was buried so that "if ever I were to go far away, I would come back." Then she drifts into sleep. Children will come back to this less for the story or the glimpses of Mazatecan life than for the vivid visuals. (Picture book. 6-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780888996107
Publisher:
Groundwood Books
Publication date:
09/09/2004
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.32(w) x 10.52(h) x 0.43(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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