Napi Funda un Pueblo

Napi Funda un Pueblo

by Antonio Ramirez, Domi
     
 

In this third book about Napí, the government is building a dam, forcing the Mazateca people to make a new village for themselves on inhospitable land. Napí recounts what she remembers of this time — traveling upriver to the place where they will resettle, the frighteningly beautiful jaguar she sees by the spring, the fierce fires that clear the

Overview


In this third book about Napí, the government is building a dam, forcing the Mazateca people to make a new village for themselves on inhospitable land. Napí recounts what she remembers of this time — traveling upriver to the place where they will resettle, the frighteningly beautiful jaguar she sees by the spring, the fierce fires that clear the land for farming, how her father has to walk all day to a far-off town so that he can buy food for the family. But what stands out in her mind very strongly is the misfortune that occurs when her father is kicked by a horse, which she first envisions in a vivid dream. It is Napí who hastens back to the village to fetch her mother and uncles, her rapidity ensuring her father’s survival.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Napi, indomitable Mazateca Mexican heroine of two previous books, here relates the story of how her whole village had to move because the government was building a dam that would flood it. The new location on a mountain is far from any road and must be cleared for building and planting. During the first harvest, her father is tossed from his horse and Napi fears for his life. In a dream she becomes the jaguar she so feared in a previous encounter. She goes to the clinic where her father is to lick his wound. The next day, to her delight, he is out of danger. Her father has stayed in the village instead of leaving because her grandfather had insisted, "For us Indians, the best thing to do is to resist, to stay alive, and stay together." Napi realizes this as she helps to build the new village. The simply told but lively text is in both Spanish and English. There is an attractive, almost primitive innocence to the watercolor illustrations that fill the large double pages. Domi's lush green jungle and vibrantly colored clothing emphasize the emotion of the story while creating personal symbols of a life far from most readers' experience. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
Gr 1–3—Ramírez returns to the world of the young Mazateca girl introduced in Napí (2004) and Napí va a la montaña (2006, both Groundwood). In this installment based on a true story, Napí tells how she and her family are forced from their village because the government decides to build a dam. As the people are uprooted, they take to the water to try to find a new place to settle, and this proves to be an eye-opening experience for the girl. She encounters exotic jaguars as spring sets in, witnesses villagers setting fires to clear the land, and then grows up fast as her dad almost perishes in a fire as he goes to collect the harvest. Domi's large mural-like, earthy watercolor paintings are closely intertwined with the words and reflect the Spanish-English bilingual text and fine details. The clear text, authentic artwork, and realistic story line make for a fine addition to Spanish-language collections.—Rhonda Jeffers, Children's Services Librarian, Coweta Public Library System, Newnan, GA
Kirkus Reviews
As brilliant as backlit stained glass, Domi's big, naive watercolors create a lush country setting for this child's account of her village's relocation. Because the new dam will flood their old San Pedro Ixcatlan, a vanguard of Mazatecan families travels ahead to clear and plant rice fields for a "Nuevo Ixcatlan." In buoyant tones, young Napi records the journey, sighting a jaguar, how burning off the underbrush for the new settlement left everything-including her little brother Nicle-ashy grey and finally a dream that combines these and other memories in the wake of a scary accident to her Nami (father). The Spanish and English texts are placed well apart on facing pages beneath the full-spread illustrations. As in Napi's previous two appearances (Napi Goes to the Mountain, 2006, etc.), the author and illustrator, who are human-rights activists, build in a subtle political subtext, but children will respond most readily to Napi's guileless optimism. A glossary translates Mazatec words into both Spanish and English. (Bilingual picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780888999658
Publisher:
Groundwood Books
Publication date:
03/16/2010
Edition description:
Spanish-English Language Edition
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 12.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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