Narcissistic Patient Revisited: Progress In Self Psychology Volume 17

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Overview

Volume 17 of Progress in Self Psychology, The Narcissistic Patient Revisited, begins with the next installment of Strozier's "From the Kohut Archives": first publication of a fragment by Kohut on social class and self-formation and of four letters from his final decade. Taken together, Hazel Ipp's richly textured "Case of Gayle" and the commentaries that it elicits amount to a searching reexamination of narcissistic pathology and the therapeutic process. This illuminating reprise on the clinical phenomenology Kohut associated with "narcissistic personality disorder" accounts for the volume title. The ability of modern self psychology to integrate central concepts from other theories gains expression in Teicholz's proposal for a two-tiered theory of intersubjectivity, in Brownlow's examination of the fear of intimacy, and in Garfield's model for the treatment of psychosis. The social relevance of self psychology comes to the fore in an examination of the experience of adopted children and an inquiry into the roots of mystical experience, both of which concern the ubiquity of the human longing for an idealized parent imago. Among contributions that bring self-psychological ideas to bear on the arts, Frank Lachmann's provocative "Words and Music," which links the history of music to the history of psychoanalytic thought in the quest for universal substrata of psychological experience, deserves special mention. Annette Lachmann's consideration of empathic failure among the characters in Shakespeare's Othello and Silverstein's reflections on Schubert's self-states and selfobject needs in relation to the specific poems set to music in his Lieder round out a collection as richly broad based as the field of self psychology itself.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780881633467
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 11/28/2001
  • Series: Progress in Self Psychology Series
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Arnold Goldberg, M.D., is the Cynthia Oudejan Harris, M.D. Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Rush Medical College in Chicago, and Training and Supervising Analyst, Institute for Psychoanalysis, Chicago. He is the author of a number of books, including Being of Two Minds: The Vertical Split in Psychoanalysis (TAP, 1999) and Errant Selves: A Casebook of Misbehavior (TAP, 2000).

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Table of Contents

Strozier, From the Kohut Archives. Part I: Theory. The Many Meanings of Intersubjectivity and Their Implications for Analyst Self-Expression and Self-Disclosure. Part II: Clinical. Fisch, The Case of Gayle and Discussions. Ipp, The Case of Gayle. Rignstrom, Straddling Two Revolutions: A Discussion of Hazel Ipp's Clinical Case. Doctors, Clinical Notes on the Self-Psychological/Intersubjective "Contextualization of Narcissism": A Discussion of Hazel Ipp's Clinical Case. Fisch, A Self Less Divided: A Discussion of Hazel Ipp's Clinical Case. Knoblauch, Nonverbal Implicit Dimensions of Interaction: A Discussion of Hazel Ipp's Clinical Case. Ipp, Reply to the Discussions. Bromlow, The Fear of Intimacy: The Clinical Application of Three Developmental Theories, Attachment, Motivational Systems, and Intersubjectivity. Garfield, The Use of Vitality Affects in the Coalescence of Self in Psychosis. Siegel, Siegel, Adoption and the Enduring Fantasy of an Idealized Other. Fisher, Discussion of Siegel and Siegel's "Adoption and the Enduring Fantasy of an Idealized Other." Part III: Applied. Lachmann, The Theme of Cuckoldry in Othello. Lachmann, Words and Music. Rector, Mystical Experience as an Expression of the Idealizing Selfobject Need. Silverstein, Selfobject Functions, Self States, and Intimate Forms of Musical Composition: Influences from Literary Texts on the Art Song.

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