Narrative Based Medicine / Edition 1

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Overview

Edited by two leading general practitioners and with contributions from over 20 authors, this book covers a wide range of topics to do with narrative in medicine. It includes a wealth of real examples of patients narratives and addresses theoretical and practical issues including the use of narrative as a therapeutic tool, teaching narrative to students, philosophical issues, narrative in legal and ethical decisions, narrative in nursing, and the narrative medical record.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Albert Liebman, MD (Medical College of Wisconsin)
Description: This soft-cover book consists of essays by multiple contributors on the narrative in healthcare. The editors, who also serve as contributors, are part-time general practitioners in London. The other 27 contributors are drawn from a variety of backgrounds, including history, psychiatry, epidemiology and public health, biology, computer science, the humanities, nursing, and anthropology. Three chapters consist of patient accounts of their illnesses.
Purpose: The introduction sets forth the proposition that the subject of narrative in medical education and practice has been neglected. In Chapter 1 the editors marshal the argument that the learned expertise of constructing a medical history and its emphasis on the "scientific" neglects skills that are "fundamentally linguistic, empathetic, and interpretive." The book represents the marshaling of evidence to turn attention to the interpretive aspect of the patient narrative. The worthy objective of the book is to once again bring the intricately woven fabric of disease and illness that includes the biologic, social, cultural, and experiential context of the patient to the attention of healthcare practitioners. The diverse backgrounds of the essayists highlight the theme from a variety of perspectives.
Audience: The editors state that it is intended for healthcare professionals. Hoever, it would appear that they are particularly addressing issues of the education and medical practice style of physicians, particularly general practitioners.
Features: The book is composed of 25 chapters divided into 6 sections. Some of the highlights include a previously published piece by Stephen Jay Gould on his illness and observations on variability in biology and statistics; a report from two of the teachers in the Michigan State course for medical students in literature; and the essay by one of the editors, entitled "Narrative Based Medicine in an Evidence Based World." The references at the end of each chapter are extensive and of high quality. The editors include an appendix of "some recommended readings" to "enliven the study of medicine or other health sciences."
Assessment: There have been many previous clarion calls for attention to the patient's story and the psycho-social context of medical practice. Among these are Balint's classic book, The Doctor, His Patient and the Illness, published in 1957, and his work with practitioners in that period emphasizing the patient's story in medical care. This book, however, applies post-modern forms of analyses to the issues of the subjective and science in medical practice.
From the Publisher
"Add NBM to your EBM and discard your medical mythology" - Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Albert Liebman
This soft-cover book consists of essays by multiple contributors on the narrative in healthcare. The editors, who also serve as contributors, are part-time general practitioners in London. The other 27 contributors are drawn from a variety of backgrounds, including history, psychiatry, epidemiology and public health, biology, computer science, the humanities, nursing, and anthropology. Three chapters consist of patient accounts of their illnesses. The introduction sets forth the proposition that the subject of narrative in medical education and practice has been neglected. In Chapter 1 the editors marshal the argument that the learned expertise of constructing a medical history and its emphasis on the ""scientific"" neglects skills that are ""fundamentally linguistic, empathetic, and interpretive."" The book represents the marshaling of evidence to turn attention to the interpretive aspect of the patient narrative. The worthy objective of the book is to once again bring the intricately woven fabric of disease and illness that includes the biologic, social, cultural, and experiential context of the patient to the attention of healthcare practitioners. The diverse backgrounds of the essayists highlight the theme from a variety of perspectives. The editors state that it is intended for healthcare professionals. Hoever, it would appear that they are particularly addressing issues of the education and medical practice style of physicians, particularly general practitioners. The book is composed of 25 chapters divided into 6 sections. Some of the highlights include a previously published piece by Stephen Jay Gould on his illness and observations on variability in biology andstatistics; a report from two of the teachers in the Michigan State course for medical students in literature; and the essay by one of the editors, entitled ""Narrative Based Medicine in an Evidence Based World."" The references at the end of each chapter are extensive and of high quality. The editors include an appendix of ""some recommended readings"" to ""enliven the study of medicine or other health sciences."" There have been many previous clarion calls for attention to the patient's story and the psycho-social context of medical practice. Among these are Balint's classic book, The Doctor, His Patient and the Illness, published in 1957, and his work with practitioners in that period emphasizing the patient's story in medical care. This book, however, applies post-modern forms of analyses to the issues of the subjective and science in medical practice.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780727912237
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 11/17/1998
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction.

1.Why study narrative?.

2.Turtles all the way down.

Illness stories.

3.Themedian isn't the message.

4.The night my life changed.

5.The good bleed guide.

6.Stories of dying.

7.Have i got epilepsy or has it got me?.

Filler: the conker tree.

Narrative in medicine.

8.Pain narratives.

9.Following hte story: continuity of care in general practice.

10.Narrative and mental health.

11.Sirens, stray dogs and the narrative of hilda thomson.

12.The surgeon's narrative.

Filler: pressuring mrs thomas to accept her treatment.

Learning and teaching narrative.

13.Literature in medicine.

14.Teaching humanities in the undergraduate medical curriculum.

15.The golden narrative in british medicine.

16.Nursing, narrative and the moral imagination.

Filler: Upwardly mobile.

Understanding narrative in health care.

17.Stories that we hear and stories we tell.

18.Narrative in psychotherapy.

19.The narrative in medical record.

20.Anecdote in clinical practice.

Filler: Dead notes.

Broader perspectives on narrative in health care.

21.Narrative in medical ethics.

22.Cross cultural medical narratives: some case studies from latvia and siberia.

23.The narrative stream in medical negligence.

24.Narrative based medicine in an evidence based world.

Filler: Dear tom

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