Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave: Written by Himself (Norton Critical Editions Series) / Edition 1 by Frederick Douglass | 9780312257378 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave: Written by Himself / Edition 2

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave: Written by Himself / Edition 2

4.6 124
by Frederick Douglass, David W. Blight
     
 

ISBN-10: 0312257376

ISBN-13: 9780312257378

Pub. Date: 12/28/2002

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

Douglass's graphic depictions of slavery, harrowing escape to freedom, and life as newspaper editor, eloquent orator, and impassioned abolitionist.

Overview

Douglass's graphic depictions of slavery, harrowing escape to freedom, and life as newspaper editor, eloquent orator, and impassioned abolitionist.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312257378
Publisher:
Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date:
12/28/2002
Series:
Bedford Cultural Editions Series
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
188
Sales rank:
201,005
Product dimensions:
5.43(w) x 8.23(h) x 0.38(d)

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface

INTRODUCTION: "A PSALM OF FREEDOM"

PART I. THE DOCUMENT

A Note About the Text
Preface by William Lloyd Garrison, May 1, 1845
Letter from Wendell Phillips, Esq., April 22, 1845
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself

PART II. SELECTED REVIEWS, DOCUMENTS, AND SPEECHES

Caleb Bingham, "Dialogue Between a Master and a Slave," in The Columbian Orator 1797
Margaret Fuller, Review of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, New York Tribune, June 10, 1845
Ephraim Peabody, "Narratives of Fugitive Slaves," excerpt, Christian Examiner, July 1849
Nathaniel P. Rogers, "Southern Slavery and Northern Religion: Two Addresses" delivered in Concord, New Hampshire, February 11, 1844, as reported in Concord, N.H. Herald of Freedom, February 16, 1844
Frederick Douglass, "My Slave Experience in Maryland," an address delivered in New York City, May 6, 1845, as recorded in National Antislavery Standard, May 22, 1845
Frederick Douglass, "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" speech delivered in Rochester, New York, July 5, 1852

APPENDIXES

A Frederick Douglass Chronology (1818–1895)
Questions for Consideration
Selected Bibliography

Index

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >