Narrative of the Life of Olaudiah Equiano / Edition 1

Narrative of the Life of Olaudiah Equiano / Edition 1

by Olaudah Equiano
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0393974944

ISBN-13: 9780393974942

Pub. Date: 12/28/2000

Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.

The text of Equiano’s narrative presented here is that of the 1789 first edition.
It is accompanied by an introduction, maps, illustrations, and annotations. "Contexts" provides essential public writings on the autobiography, general and historical background, related travel and scientific literature, other eighteenth-century works by authors of African

Overview

The text of Equiano’s narrative presented here is that of the 1789 first edition.
It is accompanied by an introduction, maps, illustrations, and annotations. "Contexts" provides essential public writings on the autobiography, general and historical background, related travel and scientific literature, other eighteenth-century works by authors of African ancestry, and works debating the slave trade. "Criticism" includes six contemporary reviews and nine modern essays on the narrative by Paul Edwards, Charles T. Davis, Houston A. Baker, Jr., Angelo Costanzo, Catherine Obianju Acholonu, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Geraldine Murphy, Adam Potkay, and Robert J. Allison. A Chronology and Selected Bibliography are included.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393974942
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
12/28/2000
Series:
Norton Critical Editions Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
327,360
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Introductionix
Acknowledgmentsxxxiii
Map: Equiano's World2
Title page5
Frontispiece6
List of Subscribers8
Contents of Volumes I and II16
The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself19
Note on the Text179
Selected Variants181
Additions181
Selected Textual Differences between the First and Ninth Editions189
Contexts
Illustration: Nautical Terms193
Related Public Writings
From Cursory Remarks [upon James Ramsay's Antislavery Writing] (1785)195
Letter to James Tobin (January 28, 1788)196
From Humanity; or, the Rights of Nature (1788)199
Letter to the Author of the Poem on Humanity (June 27, 1788)203
Illustration: "Description of a Slave Ship"204
Letter to the Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade (February 14, 1789)205
General Background
From A Discourse upon the Origin and Foundation of the Inequality among Mankind (1755, transl. 1761)206
Historical Background
[Humanitarianism, John Wesley, and Gustavus Vassa]210
[The Nature of the Protest]216
From Many Thousand Gone: The Ex-Slaves' Account of Their Bondage and Freedom217
[The Rupture and the Ordeal]222
Eighteenth-Century English Literature on Commerce and Slavery228
Illustrations: I. Cruikshank, William Blake, and Anonymous242
Travel and Scientific Literature
From Some Historical Account of Guinea (1771)250
From A Voyage to the River Sierra-Leone (1788)253
From Essay on the Causes of the Different Colours of People in Different Climates (1744)256
Eighteenth-Century Authors of African Ancestry
[From A Narrative] (1770, 1774)259
[A Captive of the Cherokees] (1785)265
[Reflections and Memories] (1787)269
The English Debate About the Slave Trade
From An Essay on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species, Particularly the African (1786)277
Letter to William Wilberforce Commenting on Gustavus Vassa (February 24, 1791)281
From Speech in the House of Commons (May 13, 1789)282
From The 1791 Debate in the House of Commons on the Abolition of the Slave Trade283
Antislavery Verse
From The Dying Negro (1773)288
Criticism
Early Reviews and Assessments
From the Monthly Review (1789)295
From General Magazine and Impartial Review (1789)296
"W." [May Wollstonecraft] [Review of The Interesting Narrative] (1789)296
From Gentleman's Magazine (1789)297
Vassa (1808)298
[Olaudah Equiano] (1833)301
Modern Criticism
From Introduction to The Life of Olaudah Equiano302
From The Slave Narrative: First Major Art Form in an Emerging Black Tradition338
From Figurations for a New American Literary History339
From The Spiritual Autobiography and Slave Narrative of Olaudah Equiano348
The Home of Olaudah Equiano--A Linguistic and Anthropological Search351
From The Trope of the Talking Book361
Olaudah Equiano, Accidental Tourist368
From Olaudah Equiano and the Art of Spiritual Autobiography382
Equiano's Narrative as an Abolitionist Tool393
Olaudah Equiano: A Chronology397
Selected Bibliography401

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