Narratives We Organize By

Overview

This book is a collection of texts that explore the analogy between organizing and narrating, between action and text. The raw material of everyday organizational life consists of disconnected fragments, physical and verbal actions that do not make sense when reported with simple chronology. Narrating is organizing this raw and fragmented material with the help of such devices as plot and characters. Simultaneously, organizing makes narration possible, because it orders people, things and events in time and ...
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Overview

This book is a collection of texts that explore the analogy between organizing and narrating, between action and text. The raw material of everyday organizational life consists of disconnected fragments, physical and verbal actions that do not make sense when reported with simple chronology. Narrating is organizing this raw and fragmented material with the help of such devices as plot and characters. Simultaneously, organizing makes narration possible, because it orders people, things and events in time and place. The collection, written by organization researchers from many different countries, explores this analogy in both directions, reporting studies that show how narratives are made in situ, and applying narrative analysis (structuralist and poststructuralist) to stories already in existence.
Barbara Czarniawska is Skandia Professor of Management Studies at GRI, School of Economics and Commercial Law, Göteborg University, Sweden.

Pasquale Gagliardi is Professor of Sociology of Organization at the Catholic University of Milan, and Managing Director of ISTUD- Istituto Studi Direzionali, Milan-Stresa, Italy.

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Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction
Pt. 1 Structuralist approaches to narrative analysis 1
Sensegiving and sensemaking in an integration process: A narrative approach to the study of an international acquisition 3
Narrative institutions we organize by: The case of municipal administration 37
Pt. 2 Poststructuralist approaches to narrative 55
Re-navigating management theory: Steering by the star of Mary Follet 57
The body of the text and the ordinary narratives of organisation 75
Pt. 3 Genre analysis 93
How can strategy be a practice? Between discourse and narration 95
Narratives of organizational performances 115
Pt. 4 Stories help to understand 135
The Schweik syndrome: The narrative power of resistance by agreement 137
Detective stories and the narrative structure of organizing: Towards an understanding of organizations as texts 149
Pt. 5 Getting help from the stories of the future 171
From Lancelot to Count Zero. Tracking knights, cyber-punks and nerds in identity narratives of freelancers in the IT-field 173
Narrating the future of intelligent machines: The role of science fiction in technological anticipation 193
Pt. 6 Narrating ourselves 213
Ticking time and side cupboard: The journey of a patient 215
Fluid tales: a preservation of self in everyday life 237
About the authors and the editors 247
References 251
Index 267
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