National Geographic Atlas of the World

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When National Geographic published its first Atlas of the World more than 35 years ago, the world was indeed a different place. In order to cover today's world—including its oceans, stars, climate, natural resources, and more—National Geographic has published its seventh edition of the Atlas of the World. With each new edition, National Geographic strives to make its atlas more than just maps. You'll learn that the coldest place in the world is the Plateau Station in Antarctica, where the average daily ...
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Overview

When National Geographic published its first Atlas of the World more than 35 years ago, the world was indeed a different place. In order to cover today's world—including its oceans, stars, climate, natural resources, and more—National Geographic has published its seventh edition of the Atlas of the World. With each new edition, National Geographic strives to make its atlas more than just maps. You'll learn that the coldest place in the world is the Plateau Station in Antarctica, where the average daily temperature is minus 56.7 degrees Celsius; the most populated continent is Asia, with more than 3.6 billion people, or 60.8 percent of the world's population; the driest place on earth is the Atacama Desert in Chile; a flight from New Delhi to Rio de Janeiro covers 14,080 kilometers; life expectancy in the Republic of Zambia is 37 years; and the literacy rate in Turkmenistan is 98 percent.

Flip through the pages of this impressive book and you will feel as though the world is literally at your fingertips. Full-page spreads are devoted to more than 75 political and physical maps (political maps show borders; physical maps show mountains, water, valleys, and vegetation). There are many new touches to be found in this edition, including increased usage of satellite images, an especially helpful feature when researching the most remote regions of the earth; more than 50 updated political maps that record the impact of wars, revolutions, treaties, elections, and other events; and the use of the latest research on topics such as tectonics, oceanography, climate, and natural resources. The sheer size of the atlas's index—134pages—offers insight into just how much information is packed into 260-plus pages. The book is so physically large, in fact, that when it's open, the reader is staring at three square feet of information, a surface area larger than many television screens. The potential uses of this book for a family are vast, from settling a friendly argument to completing a school report. In the end, though, the atlas is still mostly about maps. Pages and pages of maps. Maps that force us to see how wonderful and dynamic our world is. Maps that remind us of where we've been and where we'd still like to go.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The National Geographic Society, the world leader in exploring and explaining our planet, returns with a fresh, completely revised edition of their bestselling atlas. Packed with so much information, this hefty visual treat amounts to more than just a collection of maps -- it's like a complete set of books on geography, history, travel, and environment all rolled into one stunning volume. The photography is breathtaking, as is to be expected from a National Geographic publication, and the maps are also first-rate. Thematic maps illuminate environmental concerns and resources, while detailed city maps provide a closer look at more than 243 major cities. Special sections focus in-depth on each continent, the oceans, and the constellations.
Library Journal
For the new millennium, the National Geographic Society has completely revised its full-size (47-cm.) world atlas, last published in 1992. It reflects all of the most recent geopolitical changes, including the reversion of Zaire to the Democratic Republic of Congo with renamed provinces, the return of both Hong Kong and Macao to China, new provincial boundaries in post-apartheid South Africa, the establishment of the Canadian territory of Nunavut (incorporating Inuit communities in Eastern Arctic Canada), and the demarcation line between the Bosniak-Croat Federation and the Serbian Republic in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The map text refers to the political evolution in East Timor, but it would have been helpful to have actually shown the boundaries of that troubled territory. More than 75 large-format color maps grouped by continent portray the world with detailed, digitally painted terrain modeling. Each continent is introduced by satellite, political, and physical maps and a section with country summaries (with official flags and demographic and economic data for all independent nations arranged alphabetically). Political maps for regions and specific countries follow, and there are also detail maps of 243 major cities. In addition, new thematic maps treating environmental issues, natural resources, and human culture have been added. The index includes more than 140,000 entries for cities and natural features. The atlas will be continually updated via the National Geographic Society's new web resource (nationalgeographic.com/mapmachine), where patches will be available for downloading, printing, and pasting. This outstanding publication is highly recommended for all referencecollections.--Edward K. Werner, St. Lucie Cty. Lib. Syst., Ft. Pierce, FL Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Booknews
**** Previous editions are cited in BCL3 and Sheehy. Kudos to the National Geographic Society for the continuous revision necessary to gain even temporary command of the explosive geopolitical changes around the world (such as the 3,500 place names redone in the index alone, and the updating of country profiles for each of the 191 nations). This gorgeous giant (12.25x18.5") is packed with state- of-the-art maps, photographic plates, and pictorial-textual spreads. In addition to sections devoted to each continent, additional sections are devoted to the oceans, the heavens, the dynamics of the Earth, and the habitation of the Earth. Paper edition (unseen), $80. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
John Noble Wilford
An impressive work it is -- comprehensive, as one would expect, and visually pleasing, with subtle shadings giving the flat maps the illusion of added dimension. The maps prepared directly from mosaics of satellite photography are stunning, the best I have seen... Yet this edition of the National Geographic Atlas of the World is remarkable for more than its revisions, scope and artistry. It is also the product of -- and showcase for -- dramatic technological innovations that are transforming the ancient art and science of cartography.
The New York Times Book Review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780792275435
  • Publisher: National Geographic Society
  • Publication date: 10/1/2004
  • Edition description: 8TH
  • Edition number: 8
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 12.50 (w) x 19.00 (h) x 1.68 (d)

Table of Contents

Plate
1: How to Use This Atlas
2: Revolutions in Mapping
3: Round Earth, Flat Paper
4: Earth
5: Continents Adrift
6: World Tectonics
7: World Land
8: World Oceanography
9: World Climate
10: World Biosphere
11: World Biodiversity
12: World Population
13: World Cultures
14: World Economy
15: World Food
16: World Energy
17: World Minerals
18: Worlds Beyond
19: The Moon
20: The Solar System
21: The Heavens: Northern Sky
22: The Heavens: Southern Sky
23: The Milky Way
24: The Universe
World Maps
25: The Political World
26: The Physical World
27: The Satellite World
28: North America
29: North America
30: North America, Physical
31: United States
32: United States, Physical
33: North America Flags and Facts
34: North America Flags and Facts
35: North America Flags and Facts
36: North America Flags and Facts
37: Northwestern U.S.
38: Southwestern U.S.
39: Four Corners
40: North Central U.S.
41: South Central U.S.
42: Great Lakes
43: Southeastern U.S.
44: Middle Atlantic
45: New England
46: Alaska
47: Hawaii
48: Canada
49: Western Canada
50: Central Canada
51: Eastern Canada
52: Mexico and Central America
53: Central America
54: West Indies
55: Islands; Middle American Cities
56: U.S. Cities
57: U.S. Cities
58: U.S. and Canadian Cities
59: South America
60: South America
61: South America, Physical
62: South America Flags and Facts
63: Northwestern South America
64: Eastern South America
65: Southern South America
66: South America Cities
67: Europe
68: Europe
69: Europe, Physical
70: Europe Flags and Facts
71: Europe Flags and Facts
72: Europe Flags and Facts
73: British Isles
74: England and Wales
75: Ireland, Scotland
76: France, Belgium, The Netherlands
77: The Low Countries, Denmark
78: Spain and Portugal
79: Scandinavia
80: Germany
81: Italy
82: Switzerland, Austria, and Northern Italy
83: Poland, Lithuania, Czech Republic, and Slovakia
84: The Balkans
85: Greece and the Aegean
86: European Russia
87: Europe Cities
88: Europe Cities
89: Asia
90: Asia
91: Asia, Physical
92: Asia Flags and Facts
93: Asia Flags and Facts
94: Asia Flags and Facts
95: Eastern Russia
96: Middle East
97: Eastern Mediterranean
98: Southwestern Asia
99: Southern Asia
100: Southeastern Asia
101: Indochina
102: China
103: China Coast
104: Japan and Korea
105: Asia Cities
106: Asia Cities
107: Africa
108: Africa
109: Africa, Physical
110: Africa Flags and Facts
111: Africa Flags and Facts
112: Africa Flags and Facts
113: Northwestern Africa
114: Northeastern Africa
115: Southern Africa
116: Africa Cities
117: Australia and New Zealand
118: Australia
119: Australia, Physical
120: Australia/Oceania Flags and Facts
121: New Zealand, New Guinea, Cities
122: Antarctica
123: Antarctica
124: World Oceans
125: Atlantic Ocean Floor
126: Atlantic Ocean
127: Pacific Ocean Floor
128: Pacific Ocean
129: Islands of the Pacific
130: Indian Ocean Floor
131: Indian Ocean
132: Arctic Ocean Floor
133: Arctic Ocean
134: Ocean Floor Around Antarctica
135: Geographic Comparisons
136: Temperature and Rainfall
137: World Cities; Foreign Terms
Abbreviations
Index
Library of Congress CIP Data appears on page 134
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 20 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2007

    It is what it should be

    I was surprised to see the rather low overall rating of this atlas. Then I read further and saw the heated debate about some of the content, specifically what to call the Persian/Arab Gulf. With no desire to step into this argument, I do feel the need to convey that this one point of contention represents less than 1/100 of 1% of the entire information presented in this atlas. If you really disagree, write the publisher, then move on to the rest of the book - there is an abundance of objective material on every other page. I have some issues with how Tibet is (not) represented, but I don't let that keep me from enjoying every other part of the book. I think you would be hard-pressed to find any book of this size and depth without at least one potentially inflammatory bit. That said, I love this book. Truly, it is my favorite reference, along with my OED. I easily lose myself for hours in its pages. Almost any topic relating to our planet is in here somewhere. Plate tectonics? Sure! In fact, if you wonder where your continent will be in 150 million years, this atlas will show you! How big is our solar system in relation to our galaxy? To our supercluster? Its in there -if you can grasp these heady dimensions! Ever wonder what Slovenia's chief exports are? Or what Cambodia's flag looks like? Or which kind of maps show the least distortion, and why? And did you know there are deciduous needle forests? (Larch, in Russia) If you can ask it, this book will probably answer it. Even more, this book will answer questions you never knew you had. So, please, put your quarrels about a place name aside, and focus on what this tome does have to offer - an amount of accurate, breathtaking knowledge that you couldn't gain from a stack of college textbooks and a year of globetrotting. Yes, 'tis the ultimate resource. Oh, and my binding is holding up fine. Maybe that one fellow had a bad one that could be exchanged? So, purchase without hesitation. It will serve your family well for years.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2007

    not a forum for political correctness

    NG should strive not to cave in to the shifting fashions of the political correctness, although it seems that the society has been gradually doing just that over the years. A World Atlas should be an objective document striving to represent geographical detail to the highest possible degree and it troubles me to read political debates when I look for comments about the quality of this publication. Accordingly, I should not have to wonder whether a certain geographical name I read in this book is historically correct or if it is just the flavor of the month. Aside from inflammatory references to nazi bakeries, a few points are in order: 1. The Persian Gulf is an international body of water, it belongs equally to all, therefore it should be even less subjected to the political egos of a nation than a land feature may be. I am not opposed to change, but before calling it differently, let either history or a world's consensus decide so we all may know where or what in the world a referenced place actually is. Precisely for that reason we do not call the Baltic Sea the Scandinavian Gulf, nor the English Channel the French Straits 2. The Atlas should also not be skittish about being an English language publication which writes using the Roman/Latin Alphabet even if some names are written differently in their respective languages and/or alphabets. So, no, although I am foreign born, I do not have a problem with Calcutta, or Bucharest or any other name being spelled in English. In fact, even for just the sake of consistency, I much prefer that to any other alternate spelling deriving out of an arbitrary attempt to somehow relate a certain pronunciation to a totally different alphabet, which does nothing but leaves one wondering over how the darn thing is actually pronounced. Ever tried to spell Beijing in Mandarin? To add insult to the injury, the gentleman¿s remark that the atlas is coming loose at the seams after just one week of use, was the real eye-opener to me as to where the NG priorities are, or are not. I respect the genial work of all the professionals who gathered and produced all that amazing amount of information, but someone higher on the NG¿s executive ladder should be less ideological and more practical.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2007

    Great Content, Poor Hardcover Binding

    In March of 2007, I purchased and received the National Geographic Atlas of the World, Eighth Edition. I bought the hardcover version with a protective slipcase (ISBN: 0-7922-7543-8). The GOOD: The content¿all maps, the keys and abbreviations used, format and layout, photographs, detail summary of countries, and the 134 page index. The paper is of good quality and the sewn-in ribbon placeholder is very handy. I really like the maps which portray the Moon, our Solar System, and the Universe. I¿m not an expert cartographer, so I can¿t attest to correctness of geographical placement and names, but the detail evident on all maps is outstanding. In summary, for a large atlas of the world, this one has truly exceptional content. The BAD: The seam¿internally, some place names disappear into the seam in the middle of the book where the two pages meet. Some details in the seam simply aren¿t readable. Although perhaps a minor problem, print spacing could have been improved along the seam. The UGLY: The binding¿ it¿s not strong and absolutely not of good quality. I treat all my books respectfully well, just like a strict librarian. After reviewing my new NG Atlas of the World each evening for only one week, the spine is already breaking down and coming apart at one end. This leads me to believe it will be in tatters relatively quickly, which is extremely disappointing, considering the fine quality of information contained within its shoddily crafted shell. It appears National Geographic poured huge amounts of money into creating the content and spent minimal cash to create a quality hardcover to match the interior. In RETROSPECT: Softcover¿may be the way to go. I should have purchased the softcover edition to obtain all the great content, without paying a premium price for the poor quality hardcover. The life expectancy of each is probably comparable.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2006

    Beautiful

    I received this atlas for Christmas, and I love it. I've been reading obsessively about foreign countries, their different cultures and stories and conflicts, and it has contributed enormously to the experience being able to follow the locations of events in relation to the landscape and surrounding peoples. I was surprised at the summaries of countries in the back of the book. The section on America is one third pre-9/11 and the remainder deals with events in the last couple of years. One of the major wars (Civil or Revolutionary, I don't remember which) is not even mentioned. Quite a strongly telegraphic view of American History. I was delighted to see that cities throughout the world were given their proper names. Calcutta was relabeled as Kolkata. Finally, our society is beginning to acknowledge that other people had their own cultures before we got there to examine them. On that note, K. Arfaian, you really had to stretch hard to get Nazis in your tantrum over the Persian Gulf. You segwayed directly from the name of a body of water in the Middle East to Auschwitz. Wow. I must express my amazement at the awesome power of your determination to be offended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2005

    Innovative Atlas

    I was concerned about buying the atlas because of some negative reviews. However, I looked at the atlas in a nearby Barnes & Noble and found innovative graphics, along with informative and easy to read maps.It seems most of the negative reviews came from members of Iranian groups over the use of Arabian Gulf, with Persian Gulf, on the maps.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2004

    More of an encyclopedia than atlas

    Blockbuster size offers great maps, but fills way too much space with glossy photos and narrative. Felt like I was reading a glorified edition of National Geographic Magazine more than reviewing anatlas. More over, city maps faileda test which comparable atlases past: no sign of nor listing for the Londonsuburb where I grew-up. The problem is city map focused on details ofcity center at expense of inner suburbs. Fewer postcard-like photos and less narrative might have made space for broader detail of cities.However, I will buy the National Geographic Atlas for my interest inpassenger train travel: it gives rail routes worldwide, going so far as to give special distinction to high speed inter-urban service. No othergeneral purpose atlas came close to this.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 9, 2009

    Inaccurate, depicts cities that don't exist!

    I was quite disappointed to see how inaccurate and biased this atlas is. The big pro: it is the most beautiful atlas I have ever seen, and with excellent graphical charts (astronomy, data from nations etc).<BR/>However, after flipping some pages, come the cons:<BR/><BR/>1. It depicts cities that don't exist: for example, on page 51, P13. There is a town called "Crato", highlighted in comparison to nearby towns. Crato simply doesn't exist. On the other hand, just beside it lies a "small village" (as depicted in smaller fonts) called Humaitá. Actually, Humaitá is a town with around 40,000 inhabitants and it should have been portrayed in boldface. "Araras" on the same page, Q10 is also an invention.<BR/>Amazingly, the National Geographic has an online map which correctly shows the entire region.<BR/><BR/>2. Cities with different "weight" in politics/economics are shown as if they had the same importance. By seeing the map of the UK, I can assume that Manchester is as important as Wakefield (page 57, P14) or Barnsley. On the big US map (page 29), we have the impression that New York has the same weight of San Antonio, Texas. <BR/>Also, urban sprawl and conurbations are not depicted in this atlas. <BR/><BR/>3. The atlas is evidently biased towards North America and Europe. On page 59, we can see villages of 7,000 people (Jauche, Belgium, N6) under a 1:1,112,000 scale. However, you won't see important Brazilian cities such as Guarulhos, with over 1 million people, because the most detailed map of the country is to a scale of only 1:6,965,000. India, with over 1 billion inhabitants, is shown in only one map (!) under a scale of 1:6,450,000.<BR/><BR/>If I can see villages of Belgium or Nunavut, why can't I see villages of India? Or Brazilian cities of 1 million inhabitants?<BR/><BR/>If you are just looking for beautiful maps with a focus on US/Canada and Europe, then this may be the map for you. However, if you want to see the rest of the world, choose another one.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2005

    Revisionist? = Accurate

    In regards to the argument that this book, and any other 'revisionist' material is somehow anti-semetic is absurd! Do you honestly think that the United States was called the United States by our many Native peoples before the current settlers came? Do you think that throughout time place names have not changed? If a people desires that there territory be named something less offense to them (ie. Arab Gulf) it should be respected. Aside from that, this book is what it is, and is a good one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2004

    inaccurate information

    I have found a few inaccurate information, at first I was surprised but I double checked and found them wrong.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2004

    Do not buy. Too many mistakes. Wait for the next release.

    Do not buy this new atlas. It has too many mistakes. I had to give it a star, so I could submit my comments. If they correct the mistakes, purchase the corrected version.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2004

    Arabic Goegraphic Society

    This society is in business of altering our history and geography for the interest of thier rich Arab friends. Those who alter history are called revisionist, they deny historical facts about Holocaust and the name Persian Gulf. They are subject to prosecution, jail and big fine in Europien countries. NGS(Arabic geogrphic society) has decided to be a revisionist. Thier next alteration in thier world Atlas would be to name Dachau and Aushwitz just a baking factory for Natzi germany and not a concentration camp to systematicly exterminate the Jews.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted December 17, 2009

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    Posted July 12, 2010

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    Posted March 31, 2010

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    Posted July 7, 2010

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    Posted January 16, 2010

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    Posted November 9, 2009

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    Posted July 20, 2010

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    Posted March 12, 2010

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    Posted November 10, 2008

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