National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry: 200 Poems with Photographs That Squeak, Soar, and Roar!

National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry: 200 Poems with Photographs That Squeak, Soar, and Roar!

by J. Patrick Lewis
     
 

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Named one of the Best Children's Books of 2012 by Kirkus Reviews!

"Add a little natural wonder to your poetry shelves. Because if we’re talking about the best possible compliment to your eyes and ears alike, few have as many perks and grand moments as this." School Library Journal starred

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Overview

Named one of the Best Children's Books of 2012 by Kirkus Reviews!

"Add a little natural wonder to your poetry shelves. Because if we’re talking about the best possible compliment to your eyes and ears alike, few have as many perks and grand moments as this." School Library Journal starred review
 
"Out of a windless August night/A luna moth in ghostly light
Beat softly on my window screen/Tick-tick-ticking-all silver green.
She whispered secrets in my ear—/I am but a stranger here.
The stars are scrawled across the sky/By ghostwriters, the Moon and I.
You will not see me here tonight—/I have a thousand stars to write."

What could be better than cuddling up with your child and this book on your lap and allowing your imaginations to soar with the words and images? Lovingly selected by U.S. Children's Poet Laureate J. Patrick Lewis and paired with vibrant animal photography, this collection of poems is an exuberant celebration of the animal kingdom and a beautiful introduction to this genre of literature. Designed for family sharing but targeted to ages 4-8, this dynamic, fresh, yet still classic collection of animal poems is a must-have for the family bookshelf.

Featured poets include J. Patrick Lewis, Dorothy Aldis, Emily Dickinson, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Frost, Rudyard Kipling, Jack Prelutsky, Elizabeth Madox Roberts, Robert Louis Stevenson, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and many more.

Divided into chapters that group the poems by theme for extra resonance, the collection is a mix of old and new, classics, and never-before-published. A foreword from Lewis, sets the scene for helping children appreciate this gift of language and this visual feast for the eyes. Chapters include:
Welcome to the World (birth of animal young)
Big Ones (large animals—elephants, hippos, rhinos, bears)
Little Ones (small animals—worms, insects)
Winged Ones (birds and other flying creatures) 
Water Ones (aquatic animals—fish, dolphins, crabs)
Strange Ones (curious creatures—armadillos, centipedes)
Noisy Ones (loud animals—lions, hyenas)
Quiet Ones (silent or still animals—hens, rabbits, snakes)
Last Thought (a reflection on the world we share with animals)

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Gorgeous, full-bleed photographs of wild and domesticated animals accompany animal-focused poems ranging from classic works to the writings of modern children’s poets. Lewis creates compelling juxtapositions on each page—the Navajo poem “Song of a Bear” appears next to Jane Yolen’s “Grandpa Bear’s Lullaby,” and a dense school of Bali sardines, described as “ballerinas of the blue” in the accompanying haiku, almost resemble a shimmering tutu. The tone can vary from silly to sublime and sad: “Those who saw the buffaloes are gone./ And the buffaloes are gone,” laments Carl Sandburg’s “Buffalo Dusk.” The imagery and verse delight in equal parts in this engrossing celebration of animals in nature, the backyard, and in the imagination. Ages 4–8. (Sept.)
Kirkus Reviews
Gathered by the United States children's poet laureate, 200 (mostly) lighthearted poems from the likes of Basho and Ben Franklin, Leadbelly, Jack Prelutsky and Joyce Sidman share space with eye-popping animal photographs. A well-stirred mix of old and recent limericks, haiku, short lyrics, shaped poems and free verse, the poetry ranges far and wide. There are rib ticklers like Gelett Burgess' "Purple Cow" and Laura E. Richards' "Eletelephony" (the latter's line "Howe'er it was, he got his trunk / Entangled in the telephunk" dated in these days of cellphones but still hilarious to read, especially aloud). Others are more serious, such as Tracie Vaughn Zimmer's graceful tribute to an indoor centipede--"a ballet of legs / gliding / skating / skimming / across the stage of white porcelain"--and David McCord's elegiac "Cocoon." All are placed on or next to page after page of riveting wildlife portraits (with discreet identifying labels), from a ground-level view of a towering elephant to a rare shot of a butterfly perched atop a turtle. Other standouts include a dramatic spray of white egret plumage against a black background and a precipitous bug's-eye look down a bullfrog's throat. Lewis adds advice for budding animal poets to the excellent bibliography and multiple indexes at the end. A spectacular collection--"And," the editor notes with remarkable understatement, "the pictures are pretty nice too!" (Poetry. 7-12)
From the Publisher
Named one of the Best Children's Books of 2012 by Kirkus Reviews!

Named one of the top Children's Books of 2012 by the New York Public Library!

Named one of the 100 Magnificent Children's Books of 2012 by Fuse 8!

CYBILS' Poetry Finalist

"Add a little natural wonder to your poetry shelves. Because if we’re talking about the best possible compliment to your eyes and ears alike, few have as many perks and grand moments as this." School Library Journal starred review

“Gorgeous, full-bleed photographs of wild and domesticated animals accompany animal-focused poems ranging from classic works to the writings of modern children’s poets.” Publisher’s Weekly starred review
 
“A well-stirred mix of old and recent limericks, haiku, short lyrics, shaped poems and free verse… A spectacular collection…” Kirkus Reviews starred review
 
“I can’t think of a finer holiday gift ... This large, generously illustrated book provides a feast for the eye and animal-loving heart.” —The Boston Sunday Globe

“Stunning photographs and 200 poems ‘squeak, soar and roar’ in this bountiful bestiary that’s a delight for eyes and ears alike.” —New York Public Library

“The poems are well chosen and include rhyming, free verse, and shape poetry... This selection is sure to turn any animal lover into a poetry lover.” —Provo Library 

“Lewis has carefully chosen classic and contemporary poems for their array of styles and moods." —Children’s Literature Comprehensive Database

“The perfect keepsake gift for little animal lover on your Christmas list.” The Review Wire
 
“What could be better than cuddling up with your child and this book on your lap and allowing your imaginations to soar with the words and images?” Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast

"Take poems by Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson and others, add photos by National Geographic and you've got the spectacular Book of Animal Poetry." —Redding.com

 “Stunning photographs combine with wonderful poems to create a family treasure of all to share,” —Patch.com

Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
Get up close with a Buffalo, a Luna Moth, a Black-Headed Gull, and a Frilled Lizard. Would you prefer another animal? It is probably here in this collection that brings together all styles of animal poems and the power and clarity of National Geographic photographs. Lewis has carefully chosen classic and contemporary poems for their array of styles and moods. The photographs reflect and build on them. Every turn-of-the-page offers a unique perspective in both words and pictures. This oversize book is meant to be shared: one person can read a poem while the other listens and absorbs the imagery in the poem and photograph. Lewis divides the poems into eight sections, by type of animal: big, little, winged, water, strange, noisy, and quiet. In "Final Thought" there are four poems to inspire the reader to think about the natural world. This is an excellent resource for a classroom. The back matter includes a section to encourage children to write poems. Have this collection available as students are making their selections for animal reports. There are four indexes: title, poet, first line, and subject. Be sure to remove the book jacket. J. Patrick Lewis has one more surprise in store for the reader. Highly recommended as a gift book as well as a classroom treasury of poetry. Reviewer: Sharon Salluzzo
School Library Journal
Gr 1–5—A captivating collection of interesting, educational, and entertaining poems. Most of the selections are by famous poets-Dickinson, Nash, Kipling, Whitman-but some are by lesser-known writers. Gorgeous, close-up color photographs accompany the poems, which feature every conceivable type of creature-owls, giraffes, horses, anteaters, snakes, etc. The photos correspond well with the specific animal being discussed, giving young readers a visual aid. A detailed table of contents is broken down by type of animal rather than alphabetically or even by species. For example, the category "The Big Ones" includes elephants and bears, and "The Strange Ones" features meerkats and seahorses. Lewis sings the praises of the diversity of the animal world in his introduction, and his "final thought" urges children to not only learn about animals and celebrate them, but also to respect them and the Earth in general. A special section on how to write poems highlights a few of the different forms. Selections are indexed by title, poet, first line, and subject, allowing for ease of navigation. This visually stunning book is sure to delight nature lovers everywhere.—Rita Meade, Brooklyn Public Library, NY

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781426310096
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
09/11/2012
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
466,292
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Named one of the Best Children's Books of 2012 by Kirkus Reviews!

Named one of the top Children's Books of 2012 by the New York Public Library!

Named one of the 100 Magnificent Children's Books of 2012 by Fuse 8!
 
CYBILS' Poetry Finalist

"Add a little natural wonder to your poetry shelves. Because if we’re talking about the best possible compliment to your eyes and ears alike, few have as many perks and grand moments as this. School Library Journal starred review

“Gorgeous, full-bleed photographs of wild and domesticated animals accompany animal-focused poems ranging from classic works to the writings of modern children’s poets.” Publisher’s Weekly starred review
 
“A well-stirred mix of old and recent limericks, haiku, short lyrics, shaped poems and free verse… A spectacular collection…” Kirkus Reviews starred review

“I can’t think of a finer holiday gift ... This large, generously illustrated book provides a feast for the eye and animal-loving heart.” —The Boston Sunday Globe

“Stunning photographs and 200 poems ‘squeak, soar and roar’ in this bountiful bestiary that’s a delight for eyes and ears alike.” —New York Public Library

“The poems are well chosen and include rhyming, free verse, and shape poetry... This selection is sure to turn any animal lover into a poetry lover.” —Provo Library 

“Lewis has carefully chosen classic and contemporary poems for their array of styles and moods." —Children’s Literature Comprehensive Database

“The perfect keepsake gift for little animal lover on your Christmas list.” The Review Wire
 
“What could be better than cuddling up with your child and this book on your lap and allowing your imaginations to soar with the words and images?” Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast

 “Stunning photographs combine with wonderful poems to create a family treasure of all to share,” Patch.com

"Take poems by Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson and others, add photos by National Geographic and you've got the spectacular Book of Animal Poetry." —Redding.com

Read More

Meet the Author

U.S. children's poet laureate for 2011-2013, J. PATRICK LEWIS is the author of more than fifty books of poetry for children, which find their shape in both free and formal verse and engage a wide range of subjects from history to mathematics, Russian folklore to the animal kingdom. His books for children include New York Times Best Illustrated Book The Last Resort (2002, illustrated by Roberto Innocenti and translated into more than a dozen languages) and The Shoe Tree of Chagrin (2001, illustrated by Chris Sheban), which won the Society of Children's Book Writers & Illustrators' Golden Kite Award. His children's poetry has been widely anthologized, and his contributions to children's literature have been recognized with the 2011 Poetry Award from the National Council of Teachers of English and the Ohioana Awards' 2004 Alice Louise Wood Memorial Prize.

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