National Geographic Complete Birds of North America by Jonathan Alderfer, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
National Geographic Complete Birds of North America

National Geographic Complete Birds of North America

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by Jonathan Alderfer
     
 

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Essential, comprehensive, and easy to use, National Geographic Complete Book of Birds is an astonishing resource that covers every bird species in North America, as well as all the migrants that fly through. The entries are organized by family groups-an incredible 82 are included-according to the American Ornithological Union guidelines. Within a family,

Overview

Essential, comprehensive, and easy to use, National Geographic Complete Book of Birds is an astonishing resource that covers every bird species in North America, as well as all the migrants that fly through. The entries are organized by family groups-an incredible 82 are included-according to the American Ornithological Union guidelines. Within a family, each separate bird entry has dozens of tips and illustrations on species' genders, age groups, behavior, habitats, nesting and feeding habits, and migration routes. Readers will also find unique features, such as:

  • A quick-find index for the most common bird groups and a full glossary
  • Straightforward, accessible text by numerous birding experts, including National Geographic's resident birding consultant Jonathan Alderfer
  • Hundreds of range and migration maps from renowned ornithologist Paul Lehman with National Geographic cartographers
  • State-of-the-art, updated bird illustrations by expert artists, including Jonathan Alderfer
  • New and original photographs from well-known bird photographers Kevin Karlson and Brian Small

Perfect for novice or experienced birders alike, National Geographic Complete Book of Birds is a definitive, must-have resource. Quite simply, there is no other volume like it.

Editorial Reviews

Through four editions, National Geographic's field guide to the birds of North America has won a stellar reputation for reliability and accessibility. Now this authoritative nature publisher introduces the ultimate desk or library bird reference. National Geographic Complete Book of Birds of North America covers every bird species on the continent, as well as all the migrants that fly through. For convenience, this 680-page guide is organized by 82 bird family groups. Within each family, each bird entry features dozens of tips and illustrations on habitats, behavior, nesting and feeding habits, and migration routes. This reference contains hundreds of range and migration maps; bird illustrations by expert artists; original photographs by well-known bird photographers; and a handy quick-find index.
Library Journal
Birders certainly have their hands full with all the recently published field guides and companion volumes (Tom Wood's The Birds of North America; Bill Thompson's Identify Yourself). The latest to take wing is this massive desk reference, a companion to the National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America. (An additional companion is the National Geographic Reference Atlas to the Birds of North America.) Edited by birding expert and field guide illustrator Alderfer, it includes the expected: chapters for the more than 80 avian families, with an overview of plumage, behavior, distribution, taxonomy, and conservation. This is followed by descriptions of all 962 species (covering identification, similar species, voice, status, and distribution) and sidebars that address such topics as difficult identifications. This is an admirable work, richly illustrated with 150 color photographs, 4000 art pieces, and 750 maps, but how does it compare with David Sibley's acclaimed The Sibley Guide to Birds? While both sources offer the information birders desire, National Geographic's use of technical terminology may especially attract advanced birders craving detailed, technical descriptions (e.g., Sibley refers to "bills" while National Geographic identifies them as "mandibles"). Birders seeking comparative essays may prefer Sibley, while those who crave individual species details will go with National Geographic. Libraries should feather their nests with both volumes. Strongly recommended for all natural history collections.-Nancy Moeckel, Brill Science Lib., Miami Univ., Oxford, OH Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780792241751
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
11/15/2005
Pages:
640
Sales rank:
484,685
Product dimensions:
7.10(w) x 9.97(h) x 1.91(d)

Meet the Author

Jonathan Alderfer, a widely published author and field guide illustrator, is well known in the birding community for his expertise as a field ornithologist and his knowledge of North American birds. He has served as a general consultant and an art consultant for the National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America (4th edition) and is the Associate Editor of Birding, the magazine of the American Birding Association.

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National Geographic Complete Birds of North America 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
DarcyLizzy More than 1 year ago
Awesome! This book is better than Sibley or Peterson, but this is not a field guide, as it's too heavy! But it is a great reference book, especially if you ID birds from photographs a great deal as I do. I have found it to be more accurate than the other guides. There is an updated version of this book with 1000 species in it, and it is understandably a hardback. This is a soft cover version with about 60 species less than the new hardcover. I would recommend this book anyway even though it's a bit out of date.
glauver More than 1 year ago
This is a nice book but I am not sure what niche it is trying to fill.I found a bargain copy in paperback and am reviewing it. That said, I like it batter than the smaller National Geographic Field Guide. The pages are less cluttered with pictures, the data is very recent, and there is much more species information.I still will turn to Sibley or Peterson first but I am glad to have picked this volume up at a bargain price.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago