National Geographic Kids Everything Big Cats: Pictures to Purr About and Info to Make You Roar!

National Geographic Kids Everything Big Cats: Pictures to Purr About and Info to Make You Roar!

by Elizabeth Carney
     
 

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Bring on the Big Cats! No tame tabbies, these four big predators, the lion, leopard, jaguar, and tiger, are known for their powerful roars. Kids can prowl through the lion's to-do list and the tiger's steak dinner to learn all about the big 4, then move beyond the big cats to see how they stock up against the pretty kitties. Elizabeth Carney shares real-life

Overview

Bring on the Big Cats! No tame tabbies, these four big predators, the lion, leopard, jaguar, and tiger, are known for their powerful roars. Kids can prowl through the lion's to-do list and the tiger's steak dinner to learn all about the big 4, then move beyond the big cats to see how they stock up against the pretty kitties. Elizabeth Carney shares real-life wildlife tips, so kids can become big eat experts themselves.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Elizabeth Leis-Newman
If the large color picture of the tiger on the cover does not hook a student into learning about big cats, the interactive glossary, quiz and fun facts will quickly suck them in. National Geographic has created a blockbuster big cat book that is easy to understand but also provides a large amount of information. Roaring distinguishes the four big cats —leopard, lion, tiger and jaguar—from their cousins (like the puma) who purr due to a different throat structure. A helpful graph shows how all cats descended into different branches, from the lion to the domestic house cat. Other facts include how high a leopard can drag prey (as high as fifty feet up a tree) and those jaguars and lions love to swim. Sections include how cats raise their young, how they hunt, cats in culture, and how to tell the difference between different types of big cats based on their markings. Since it is a National Geographic publication, it is no surprise that the book springs to life via the color pictures, courtesy of explorers and photographers Beverly Joubert and Derek Joubert. Proper space is devoted to these amazing photos, making the big cats seem even more lifelike. Adults and children, be it in a classroom or home, will learn and enjoy learning about big cats. It is a must-have for any student (or adult) interested in wild animals. "National Geographic Kids" series. Reviewer: Elizabeth Leis-Newman

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781426308055
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
04/12/2011
Series:
National Geographic Kids Everything Series
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
260,315
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
950L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

ALONE ON THE PROWL
 
Most cats prefer the single life. Usually, big cats only tolerate company in order to mate or to raise their cubs. Big cats communicate with scent marks or roars to let their neighbors know, “This is my space. Keep out!”
 
But there’s one big exception: lions. Lions are the only cats that live in social groups, called prides. Within a pride, nearly every female is related. Moms, sisters, aunts, and cousins all work together to raise cubs and hunt for enough food to support the pride. A dominant male or two will guard the pride’s territory. He also babysits the cubs while their mothers are off hunting.
 
Young males are forced to leave the pride once they are old enough to hunt for themselves. These lions sometimes form small, all-boy gangs, called bachelor groups. The youngsters stay together until they’re big enough to challenge a dominant male for control of a pride.

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