The National Interest on International Law and Order

The National Interest on International Law and Order

by R. James Woolsey
     
 

International law and the nature of the global order is regularly examined and debated among specialists. This volume brings together in one place twenty-four articles addressing these subjects, written by some of America’s leading academics, lawyers, and policymakers, and originally published in The National Interest, a leading realist journal of

See more details below

Overview

International law and the nature of the global order is regularly examined and debated among specialists. This volume brings together in one place twenty-four articles addressing these subjects, written by some of America’s leading academics, lawyers, and policymakers, and originally published in The National Interest, a leading realist journal of international affairs.

Prominent jurists, lawyers, and practitioners debate the role that international law should play in the formulation of policy in the first section, and whether “international law” really exists. Authors explore such questions as the enforceable norms of global behavior, and if American foreign policy should conform to such regulations. A second section looks at the viability and utility of international institutions in advancing U.S. interests. Included are debates over the role and purpose of the United Nations and the International Criminal Court. A third Section deals with the intersection of law enforcement and foreign policy. It explores such questions as whether primary responsibility for combating global terrorism and the international drug trade should be vested with law enforcement agencies or whether it should fall under the purview of foreign policy.

The final portion of the book is devoted to the question of human rights, particularly the tripartite debate between Robin Fox, Francis Fukuyama, and William F. Schulz over the nature and origins of human rights. Among the questions considered are whether human rights are an outgrowth of natural law, or are natural imperatives at odds with protecting individual dignities and freedoms. Is there a universal standard of rights, or are human rights norms derived from majority consensus? The list of distinguished contributors to this volume include John Bolton, Robert Bork, Lee Casey, Douglas Feith, Owen Harries, Senator Jesse Helms, Alan Keyes, Irving Kristol, Joseph Nye, Jeremy Rabkin, David Rivkin, Alfred P. Rubin, and Abrahama Sofaer. This volume will be of interest to legal scholars, political scientists, and students of diplomacy and international relations.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780765805652
Publisher:
Transaction Publishers
Publication date:
06/15/2003
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
6.06(w) x 8.94(h) x 0.81(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
1The Rocky Shoals of International Law3
2International Law versus the American Constitution16
3International Crime and Punishment31
4The Limits of "International Law"35
5International Law and the Use of Force46
6After Guantanamo: The War Over the Geneva Convention63
7Seven Tests: Between Concert and Unilateralism77
8American Sovereignty and the UN88
9Courting Danger: What's Wrong with the International Criminal Court93
10Dayton, Bosnia, and the Limits of Law109
11Retail Diplomacy: The Edifying Story of UN Dues Reform118
12Fixing the United Nations131
13Law in Order: Reconstructing U.S. National Security147
14The Law at War: How Osama Slipped Away161
15The Reach of American Law167
16Law in the Service of Terror178
17Human Nature and Human Rights197
18Natural Rights and Human History211
19The Ground and Nature of Human Rights230
20What Price Human Rights?243
21"Exporting Democracy" - and Getting It Wrong254
22The Idea of Human Rights267
23"Human Rights": The Hidden Agenda277

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >