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National Wildlife Federation's World of Birds: A Beginner's Guide
     

National Wildlife Federation's World of Birds: A Beginner's Guide

by Kim Kurki, National Wildlife Federation
 

National Wildlife Federation's World of Birds introduces kids ages 7 through 12 to more than 120 different species of birds in their native environments, with detailed illustrations and exciting, memorable information from Kim Kurki and the experts at the National Wildlife Federation.

From the National Wildlife Federation, publishers of Ranger

Overview

National Wildlife Federation's World of Birds introduces kids ages 7 through 12 to more than 120 different species of birds in their native environments, with detailed illustrations and exciting, memorable information from Kim Kurki and the experts at the National Wildlife Federation.

From the National Wildlife Federation, publishers of Ranger Rick, the popular nature magazine for kids, comes this exciting, dynamic, and wonderfully illustrated guide for young naturalists.

National Wildlife Federation's World of Birds is arranged by habitat and identifies more than 100 birds. Kim Kurki's engaging and highly accurate illustrations give kids a true and close-up appreciation of each bird species, such as its size, shape, color, and markings, as well as its habitat, call, and behavior. Kids will learn to recognize the birds by their individual characteristics, such as the male cardinal's distinctive crest, the kestrel's helicopter hover, and the goldfinch's enchanting song. You'll also discover what makes each bird amazing, including which is the fastest flier, which lays the biggest egg, and which spends years of its life in the water, never touching land.

The excellent illustrations, nontechnical language, and fascinating facts throughout make this an ideal guide for beginner bird-watchers-of any age!

Editorial Reviews

ForeWord Reviews
The Eurasian magpie is the only bird known to recognize itself in a mirror, the American robin eats an average of sixty-eight worms each day, and flamingos are pink because of the shrimp and algae they eat. Fascinating facts like these feather this almanac of over one hundred birds, offering hours of aviary education. Young ornithophilics will enjoy the accurate and friendly illustrations, engaging biological and cultural trivia, and immersive layout of each two page spread. Ages seven to twelve.

From the Publisher
The Eurasian magpie is the only bird known to recognize itself in a mirror, the American robin eats an average of sixty-eight worms each day, and flamingos are pink because of the shrimp and algae they eat. Fascinating facts like these feather this almanac of over one hundred birds, offering hours of aviary education. Young ornithophilics will enjoy the accurate and friendly illustrations, engaging biological and cultural trivia, and immersive layout of each two page spread. Ages seven to twelve.
School Library Journal
06/01/2014
Gr 2–5—Upwards of 120 representative birds of the world are described in colorful two-page entries, arranged in sections by habitats—"Fields," "Thickets & Backyards," "Woodlands & Forest," "Wetlands, Shores & Bodies of Water," "Deserts, Scrublands & Rock Slopes." The introduction describes such traits as size, behavior, feet, legs and bills, plumage, and songs and calls for beginning birdwatchers to notice. These and other traits (especially prey and eating habits) are touched upon in each entry. Bright, full-color illustrations invite both new and experienced birders to read the attractively arranged facts. Because not every bird in the text is the primary bird of each entry ("North Cardinal," for example, also discusses the pyrrhuloxia) and therefore not listed in the table of contents, the comprehensive index, which contains every bird mentioned here, is useful. The in-depth bibliography includes field guides, classics of nature literature spanning 1939 to the present, as well as magazines and websites. Fun and informative, this title will be a popular and valuable addition to library collections.—Frances E. Millhouser, formerly at Fairfax County Public Library, VA
Kirkus Reviews
2014-04-16
This introductory guide is a smorgasbord of information about the more common species of birds.The beginning spreads introduce children to habitat and critical bird identifiers, including size, behavior, plumage and song. The left-hand page of each subsequent spread profiles one bird with a magazine-style patchwork of interesting facts, trivia and even poems about the bird. The opposite page includes more fascinating tidbits and key characteristics of the featured bird and brief descriptions of other related birds, grouped by habitat. (Did you know the American robin eats 68 worms a day or that the barn owl has asymmetrical earholes?) While clearly intended for North American readers, the book also profiles several Eurasian birds, among them the British blue tit, magpie, golden oriole and Eurasian jay. This may cause confusion or at least disappointment, since North American readers are highly unlikely ever to encounter these birds. The European golden oriole seems a particularly awkward choice, as it is pictured alongside the North American Baltimore oriole, which is not related to the Eurasian species but is a member of the blackbird family.Nevertheless, Kurki's attractive and colorful illustrations and the wealth of information in this unusual bird book will encourage children to observe the birds around them, whichever continent they may inhabit. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781579129699
Publisher:
Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
06/03/2014
Pages:
80
Sales rank:
399,010
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 9.70(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
7 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Kim Kurki has been fascinated by nature since childhood. Working as an artist for more than 30 years, she has focused on the natural world, including illustrations for The Old Farmer's Almanac and National Wildlife Federation's Your Big Backyard magazine. She lives in Penns Park, PA where she is lulled to sleep at night by hooting owls. 

National Wildlife Federation is America's premier nonprofit conservation organization. Its mission statement is to protect wildlife for our children's future. As the largest grassroots conservation organization in the country, the NWF boasts more than 4 million supporters and 47 state affiliates. Their magazines include National Wildlife Magazine (adults); Ranger Rick (children ages 7-12); Ranger Rick Jr. (children ages 4-7);  and Wild Baby Animals (toddlers). 

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