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Native American Voices / Edition 3

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Overview

This unique reader presents a broad approach to the study of American Indians through the voices and viewpoints of the Native Peoples themselves. Multi-disciplinary and hemispheric in approach, it draws on ethnography, biography, journalism, art, and poetry to familiarize students with the historical and present day experiences of native peoples and nations throughout North and South America–all with a focus on themes and issues that are crucial within Indian Country today.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205633944
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 10/14/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 289,934
  • Product dimensions: 7.90 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

SUSAN LOBO is a consultant, emphasizing research, advocacy, and project design and development. She works primarily for American Indian communities, nonprofits, and nations in the United States and Central and South America. She holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Arizona and has taught at the University of California at Berkeley, where she was the coordinator of the Center for Latin American Studies. She has also taught in Native American Studies Departments at the University of California, Davis, and at the University of Arizona, and she has taught environmental studies at Merritt College. Between 1978 and 1994 she was the coordinator of the Community History Project archive, housed at Intertribal Friendship House, the Indian Center in Oakland, California. This archive is now at the Bancroft Library, Berkeley. For many years she was also a producer of the KPFA-FM radio series Living on Indian Time. She was a co-founder of the South and Central American Indian Information Center and of the American Indian Community History Center.

Her books include A House of My Own: Social Organization in the Squatter Settlements of Lima, Peru (1982); American Indians and the Urban Experience (co-editor; 2000); Urban Voices: The Bay Area American Indian Community (2002); and The Sweet Smell of Home: The Life and Art of Leonard F. Chana (2009). She has also written many articles for professional and popular journals. She is currently a distinguished visiting scholar in American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona and a consultant

for Tohono O’odham Community Action.

STEVE TALBOT received a master’s degree in anthropology and community development in 1967 from the University of Arizona and a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1974. In the early 1960s he was an American Friends Service Committee fieldworker in Indian community development on the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Arizona. He served on the board of Oakland’s Intertribal Friendship House and was closely associated with Indian student activism, the 1969 Alcatraz occupation, and the founding of the University of California at Berkeley Native American Studies program. He was acting assistant professor of Native American studies there from 1971 to 1974.

He has lectured and taught Native American studies courses in Europe and at several universities in the United States. He chaired the anthropology and sociology departments at the University of the District of Columbia, until 1983, and was a lecturer in Native American Studies at the University of California at Davis from 1988 to 1990. In 1999 Talbot retired from San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton, California. Currently he is adjunct professor of anthropology at Oregon State University and an instructor in sociology and Native American Studies at Lane Community College. His publications have dealt mainly with Native American sovereignty, religious freedom, and political activism. These include the book Roots of Oppression: The American Indian Question (1981); the article “Academic Indianismo: Social Scientific Research in American Indian Studies” in American Indian Culture and Research Journal (2002); and the article “Spiritual Genocide: The Denial of American Indian Religious Freedom from Conquest to 1934,” Wicazo Sa Review (2006). Currently he is completing an introductory text with the working title Contemporary Native Nations of North America: An Indigenous Perspective, to be published by Prentice Hall.

TRACI L. MORRIS (Chickasaw/Caucasian) holds a Ph.D. in American Indian Studies. She is the owner of Homahota Consulting and in this capacity serves as the Policy Analyst for Native Public Media. Through Homahota Consulting, Morris provides technical training for Indian country and is a community educator on tribal issues. She has worked with Native urban and tribal communities in the state of Arizona, with state agencies, the Arizona governor’s office, the Phoenix Indian Center, the Tucson Indian Center, and tribal leaders in policy analysis, resource development, and training and technical assistance. She has lectured widely over the years to community and government organizations on a wide range of Native issues and topics. Morris has lectured at universities throughout the country. She has nine years of teaching experience at various colleges and universities in Arizona, including the University of Arizona and Arizona State University. Currently she is adjunct faculty for the American Indian Studies Department at Arizona State University and in the Native American Studies Department at Eastern Central University in Oklahoma.

Morris has also worked in the arts for several museums and galleries, including internships at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian, at the George Gustav Heye Center in lower Manhattan, and at the Arizona State Museum. She worked as manager and buyer for Tucson’s oldest Native American Art Gallery, Bahti Indian Arts.

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Table of Contents

PREFACE xiii

ABOUT THE EDITORS xvii

ABOUT THE ARTISTS xix

PART I: Peoples and Nations: Following in the Footsteps of the Ancestors 1

William Stafford, HEARING THE SONG 2

Introduction 2

1 Bruce E. Johansen, DEDICATION: ON THE PASSING OF VINE DELORIA, JR. 10

2 Duane Champagne, THE RISE AND FALL OF NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES IN THE UNITED STATES 16

Map of North American Tribes 26

Map of South American Tribes 27

3 Hilary N. Weaver, INDIGENOUS IDENTITY: WHAT IS IT, AND WHO REALLY HAS IT? 28

Tom Holm, PEOPLEHOOD MATRIX 35

4 Steve Talbot, FIRST NATIONS: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF CANADA 36

Carl Waldman, Map of Nunavut and Basic Facts 41

5 R. David Edmunds, NATIVE PEOPLES OF MEXICO 42

NATIVE AMERICAN DEMOGRAPHICS–UNITED STATES, 2008 45

Susan Lobo , THE U.S. CENSUS AS “STATISTICAL GENOCIDE” 48

PART REVIEW 48

PART II: The Hidden Heritage 51

Joy Harjo, THE HIDDEN HERITAGE 52

Introduction 52

William Oandasan, BLACK BEARS 55

1 Darryl Babe Wilson, MIS MISA: THE POWER WITHIN AKOO-YET THAT PROTECTS THE WORLD 56

Luci Tapahonso , THE BEGINNING WAS MIST 62

2 Donald A. Grinde, Jr., and Bruce E. Johansen, PERCEPTIONS OF AMERICA’S NATIVE DEMOCRACIES 62

John Mohawk , ORIGINS OF IROQUOIS POLITICAL THOUGHT 70

3 Michael Kearney and Stefano Varese, LATIN AMERICA’S INDIGENOUS PEOPLES:

CHANGING IDENTITIES AND FORMS OF RESISTANCE 71

4 Alexander Ewen, MEXICO: THE CRISIS OF IDENTITY 81

Jim Adams , JIM THORPE: THAT CHAMPIONSHIP SEASON 88

5 Richard Littlebear, JUST SPEAK YOUR LANGUAGE: HENA’HAANEHE 90

PART REVIEW 92

PART III: The American Indian Story (History) 94

WithOut Reservation (WOR), WAS HE A FOOL? 95

Introduction 96

1 Steven Newcomb, FIVE HUNDRED YEARS OF INJUSTICE: THE LEGACY OF FIFTEENTH CENTURY RELIGIOUS PREJUDICE 101

2 David E. Wilkins, A HISTORY OF FEDERAL INDIAN POLICY 104

3 Mario Gonzalez, THE BLACK HILLS: THE SACRED LAND OF THE LAKOTA AND TSISTSISTAS 113

4 Poka Laenui, THE REDISCOVERY OF HAWAIIAN SOVEREIGNTY 120

5 Eileen M. Luna-Firebaugh, THE BORDER CROSSED US: BORDER CROSSING ISSUES OF THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF THE AMERICAS 128

6 Steve Talbot, GENOCIDE OF CALIFORNIA INDIANS 140

TOYPURINA: A LEADER OF HER PEOPLE 144

Rupert Costo and Jeannette Henry Costo , THE CRIME OF GENOCIDE: A UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION AIMED

AT PREVENTING DESTRUCTION OF GROUPS AND AT PUNISHING THOSE RESPONSIBLE 145

MAPS: EUROPEAN COLONIAL IMPACT ON NATIVE LANDS: 1682 AND 1783 148

PART REVIEW 149

PART IV: “The Only good Indian . . .”: Racism,

Stereotypes, and Discrimination 151

Parris Butler, INCANTATION TO DISPEL NEW AGE DOGMA 152

Introduction 152

1 Rayna Green, THE POCAHONTAS PERPLEX: THE IMAGE OF INDIAN WOMEN IN AMERICAN CULTURE 159

2 Luana Ross, PUNISHING INSTITUTIONS: THE STORY OF CATHERINE (CEDAR WOMAN) 165

Tim Giago , INDIAN-NAMED MASCOTS: AN ASSAULT ON SELF-ESTEEM 172

Shannon Prince , WE’RE IMITATING THE ENEMY 174

3 Sally J. Torpy, NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN AND COERCED STERILIZATION: ON THE TRAILS OF TEARS IN THE 1970s 175

Amnesty International , MAZE OF INJUSTICE: THE FAILURE TO PROTECT INDIGENOUS WOMEN

FROM SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN THE USA 184

4 James Riding In, Cal Seciwa, Suzan Harjo, and Walter Echo-Hawk, PROTECTING NATIVE AMERICAN HUMAN REMAINS, BURIAL GROUNDS, AND SACRED PLACES 185

5 Elizabeth Cook-Lynn, NEW INDIANS, OLD WARS 194

Steve Talbot , FREE LEONARD PELTIER 198

PART REVIEW 199

PART V: Native Representations: Media and the Arts 201

Introduction 202

1 Theresa Harlan, CREATING A VISUAL HISTORY: A QUESTION OF OWNERSHIP 206

2 Emory Sekaquaptewa, ONE MORE SMILE FOR A HOPI CLOWN 211

3 Traci L. Morris, BUT IS IT AMERICAN INDIAN ART? 214

4 Traci L. Morris, THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 223

5 Beverly R. Singer, WIPING THE WARPAINT OFF THE LENS: NATIVE AMERICAN FILM AND VIDEO 224

6 Mathew Fleischer, GONE WITH THE WIND: A DECADE AFTER SMOKE SIGNALS, SUCCESS REMAINS ELUSIVE FOR NATIVE AMERICAN FILMMAKERS 229

NATIVE AMERICAN MEDIA 231

WEB PAGE EVALUATION CHECKLIST 233

PART REVIEW 235

PART VI: Community Wellness: Family,

Health, and Education 237

Ed Edmo, INDIAN EDUCATION BLUES 238

Introduction 238

1 Wilma Mankiller and Michael Wallis, ASGAYA-DIHI 246

2 Deanna Kingston, TRAVELING TRADITIONS 251

Frances Washburn, LAKOTA WARRIOR 257

3 Jennie R. Joe, AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKANATIVE HEALTH 258

4 Philip A. May, THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ALCOHOL ABUSE AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS: THE MYTHICAL AND REAL PROPERTIES 266

Florence Connolly Shipek , DELFINA CUERO: HER AUTOBIOGRAPHY 274

5 Larry Murillo, PERSPECTIVES ON TRADITIONAL HEALTH PRACTICES 276

Susan Lobo , RESTORING NATIVE FOODS FOR HEALTH AND COMMUNITY WELL-BEING 280

Ofelia Zepeda, SQUASH UNDER THE BED 281

Suzan Shown Harjo , MY NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: NO MORE FAT “INDIAN” FOOD 282

6 Carol Devens, “IF WE GET THE GIRLS, WE GET THE RACE”: MISSIONARY EDUCATION OF NATIVE AMERICAN GIRLS 284

Tim Giago , RESERVATION SCHOOLS FAIL TO ASSIMILATE ALL STUDENTS 291

7 Jeffrey Wollock, PROTAGONISM EMERGENT: INDIANS AND HIGHER EDUCATION 292

Map of Tribal Colleges 299

PART REVIEW 300

PART VII: The Sacred: Spirituality

and Sacred Geography 302

Introduction 303

Floyd Red Crow Westerman and Jimmy Curtiss, MISSIONARIES 303

Winona LaDuke , RECOVERING THE SACRED: THE POWER OF NAMING AND CLAIMING 308

Ofeliá Zepeda, PULLING DOWN THE CLOUDS 310

1 John (Fire) Lame Deer and Richard Erdoes, ALONE ON THE HILLTOP 310

2 Frank R. LaPena, MY WORLD IS A GIFT OF MY TEACHERS 313

3 Russell Thornton, WHO OWNS OUR PAST? THE REPATRIATION OF NATIVE AMERICAN HUMAN REMAINS AND CULTURAL OBJECTS 317

INDIANS ARE NOT SPECIMENS–INDIANS ARE PEOPLE 328

4 Victoria Bomberry, BATTLING FOR SOULS: ORGANIZING THE RETURN OF THE SACRED TEXTILES TO THE COMMUNITY OF COROMA, BOLIVIA 329

5 Suzan Shown Harjo, AMERICAN INDIAN RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ACT AFTER

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS 337

PART REVIEW 341

PART VIII: Native Sovereignty: Self-Governance,

Culture, and Sustainable Development 343

Simon J. Ortiz, IT WAS THAT INDIAN 344

Introduction 344

1 Stephen Cornell, REMAKING THE TOOLS OF GOVERNANCE: COLONIAL LEGACIES, INDIGENOUS SOLUTIONS 352

FIRST NATIONS DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE 362

THE CHICKASAW NATION: AN EXAMPLE OF NATION BUILDING 362

2 Sia Davis and Jane Feustel, INDIAN GAMING IN THE STATES: DISPELLING MYTHS AND HIGHLIGHTING ADVANTAGES 363

Victoria Bomberry , ¡EVO PRESIDENTE! 369

3 Haunani-Kay Trask, LOVELY HULA HANDS: CORPORATE TOURISM AND THE PROSTITUTION OF HAWAIIAN CULTURE 370

4 Winona LaDuke, INDIGENOUS ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVES: A NORTH AMERICAN PRIMER 376

Rick Kearns , NATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL HERO: JESUS LEON SANTOS 387

5 Steve Talbot, ALASKANATIVES STRUGGLE FOR SUBSISTENCE RIGHTS 389

THE COBELL LAWSUIT 395

PART REVIEW 396

PART IX: Urbanism: Ancient and Contemporary 398

Introduction 399

W.O.R., GROWIN’ UP ON THE REZ 402

1 Jack D. Forbes, THE URBAN TRADITION AMONG NATIVE AMERICANS 404

2 Lanada Boyer, REFLECTIONS OF ALCATRAZ 416

3 Susan Lobo, IS URBAN A PERSON OR A PLACE? CHARACTERISTICS OF URBAN INDIAN COUNTRY 424

SUSAN LOBO AMERICAN INDIAN COMMUNITY HISTORY COLLECTION 431

Victoria Bomberry , DOWNTOWN OKLAHOMA CITY, 1952 431

Esther Belin, RUBY’S WELFARE 433

4 Carol Miller, TELLING THE INDIAN URBAN: REPRESENTATIONS IN AMERICAN INDIAN FICTION 434

5 Heather Howard-Bobiwash, WOMEN’S CLASS STRATEGIES AS ACTIVISM IN NATIVE COMMUNITY BUILDING IN TORONTO, 1950—1975 445

PART REVIEW 453

PART X: Indigenous Rights: Struggle and Revitalization 455

Tom LaBlanc, INDIANISMO! 456

Introduction 456

1 John Mohawk, DIRECTIONS IN PEOPLE’S MOVEMENTS 463

2 DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES 468

National Congress of American Indians, RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE UN DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS

OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES 475

3 Jose Barreiro, VISIONS IN GENEVA: THE DREAM OF THE EARTH 476

RIGOBERTA MENCHÚ TUM 479

4 Leanne Hinton, HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE SCHOOLS 480

5 Jose Barreiro, CALL TO CONSCIOUSNESS ON THE FATE OF MOTHER EARTH: GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE 489

NARF Legal Review , ERODING ALASKA TOWN SUES 24 OIL AND ENERGY COMPANIES FOR DESTRUCTION CAUSED

BY GLOBAL WARMING 492

6 Phillip Deere, CLOSING ADDRESS 494

PART REVIEW 495

APPENDIX A: NATIVE AMERICAN LINKS TO INTERNET RESOURCES 499

APPENDIX B: NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 501

APPENDIX C: AMERICAN INDIAN HIGHER EDUCATION CONSORTIUM: TRIBAL COLLEGES 503

ILLUSTRATION CREDITS 505

INDEX 507

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